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NEWS
September 18, 2013
The following is compiled from police reports. The Columbia Flier includes descriptions of perpetrators only when the description makes identification possible. East Columbia Minstrel Way, 7100 block, between 4:06 a.m. and 4:07 a.m. Sept. 14. Entry gained to Mirage Beauty Supply by breaking glass front door with rock. Large quantity of human hair stolen. In other news from the Crime Log: Indigo Court, 9400 block, between 8 p.m. and 8:25 p.m. Sept.
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NEWS
September 18, 2013
The following is compiled from police reports. The Columbia Flier includes descriptions of perpetrators only when the description makes identification possible. East Columbia Minstrel Way, 7100 block, between 4:06 a.m. and 4:07 a.m. Sept. 14. Entry gained to Mirage Beauty Supply by breaking glass front door with rock. Large quantity of human hair stolen. In other news from the Crime Log: Indigo Court, 9400 block, between 8 p.m. and 8:25 p.m. Sept.
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FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 4, 1999
We'll wager a razor that you don't know a few of these facts about shaving, as detailed in "A Closer Shave" (Artisan, 1999), by Wallace G. Pinfold:1. Number of hours the average American man will spend shaving in his lifetime.2. The length of the longest mustache on record.3. The length of the longest beard on record.4. Reason Fidel Castro originally grew his beard.5. The best-selling after-shave in the United States.6. The medical term for razor burn.7. Year in which the first narrow-bladed folding straight razor was introduced.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Suzana Pesa was disgusted by the images of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that she saw on television. She jumped on the Internet and was soon linked to a Facebook effort to gather hair clippings from local salons to make hair booms to soak up the waves of black, greasy gook. "When it happened, I was really upset," said Pesa, a dental assistant living in Mount Vernon. "I was looking for anything I could do to help. " In two weeks, Pesa gathered two garbage bags filled with hair clippings from 10 salons in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 15, 1991
The basic weather instruments patented by an East Baltimore firm nearly 100 years are based on the same technology being used today by the Air Force and Navy in the Persian Gulf.When U.S. troops plot wind speed and direction to guide a missile launch, chances are they will be using devices made in Fells Point by Belfort Instrument, the city's pioneer in the field of weather instruments."We are one of the best kept secrets in Baltimore," said Lawrence R. Burch, president of the 70-employee company that makes barometers, wind and rain gauges and humidity detection equipment.
FEATURES
By Roy Rivenburg and Roy Rivenburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 6, 1997
It's one of life's great unsolved mysteries: How come we can send a space probe to Mars but we can't make a decent toupee?Or, more to the point, how can ABC newsman Sam Donaldson earn $2 million a year and still have such ridiculous hair?As a public service, the Los Angeles Times recently dispatched me to investigate this continuing fashion conundrum.Among my discoveries:Ancient Egyptian mummies wore hairpieces.The National Enquirer once ran this headline: "Bald Burt Reynolds Almost Blinded as Toupee Catches Fire."
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1994
The way Dennis Fallon sees the Baltimore-Washington area, there are a lot of men out there needlessly suffering the bane of hair loss, baldness and wigs that just won't stay put.Mr. Fallon, and the company he works for, Kansas City, Mo.-based Apollo International, believe all that lost hair could be found money.That's why Apollo, which develops and markets non-surgical human hair additions and hair care products, recently opened its northeast headquarters in Columbia. The office will serve Apollo salons from Northern Virginia to Boston.
NEWS
By Katherine Marks and Katherine Marks,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 16, 1996
Exhibits at the American Institute of Asian Art are funded by a strange currency of sorts -- human hair.It's a marriage of practicality, says Wang Hong, the Chinese immigrant who owns both the art gallery and the hair-importing business -- Hi Tong International Inc. -- on bustling U.S. 40 near Rogers Avenue in Ellicott City. He taps the lucrative hair-extension market in the United States to help struggling Chinese artists.Wang's hair business may be foreign to many Americans, but in such countries as China, India and Indonesia, buying hair goes back at least 100 years, he said.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Suzana Pesa was disgusted by the images of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that she saw on television. She jumped on the Internet and was soon linked to a Facebook effort to gather hair clippings from local salons to make hair booms to soak up the waves of black, greasy gook. "When it happened, I was really upset," said Pesa, a dental assistant living in Mount Vernon. "I was looking for anything I could do to help. " In two weeks, Pesa gathered two garbage bags filled with hair clippings from 10 salons in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | May 17, 2006
In 18th-century Venice, the Italian landscape painter Giovanni Antonio Canale, known as Canaletto, did a brisk business selling fictitious architectural views to the wealthy English gentlemen visiting his country. Though Canaletto was perfectly capable of producing precise renderings of well-known landmarks, he also specialized in what were known as capricci -- wholly invented scenes of monumental gates, towers, castles, bridges and other impressive structures that existed only in the artist's fertile imagination.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | May 17, 2006
In 18th-century Venice, the Italian landscape painter Giovanni Antonio Canale, known as Canaletto, did a brisk business selling fictitious architectural views to the wealthy English gentlemen visiting his country. Though Canaletto was perfectly capable of producing precise renderings of well-known landmarks, he also specialized in what were known as capricci -- wholly invented scenes of monumental gates, towers, castles, bridges and other impressive structures that existed only in the artist's fertile imagination.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Staff | October 5, 2003
Life in ancient Egypt, the Court of Versailles or 1960s Baltimore was a hair-raising experience. Really. Perhaps in no other eras has the female coiffure reached such, well, heights, towering actual feet above the wearer's skull line. There are hairdos on display in the Eternal Egypt exhibit at the Walters Art Museum (running through Jan. 18, 2004) that would make Hairspray heroine Tracy Turnblad sick with envy. For instance, there is the Shabti statuette of a woman who appears to be wearing what only could be described as a black fright wig that would put most punk rockers to shame.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 4, 1999
We'll wager a razor that you don't know a few of these facts about shaving, as detailed in "A Closer Shave" (Artisan, 1999), by Wallace G. Pinfold:1. Number of hours the average American man will spend shaving in his lifetime.2. The length of the longest mustache on record.3. The length of the longest beard on record.4. Reason Fidel Castro originally grew his beard.5. The best-selling after-shave in the United States.6. The medical term for razor burn.7. Year in which the first narrow-bladed folding straight razor was introduced.
FEATURES
By Roy Rivenburg and Roy Rivenburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 6, 1997
It's one of life's great unsolved mysteries: How come we can send a space probe to Mars but we can't make a decent toupee?Or, more to the point, how can ABC newsman Sam Donaldson earn $2 million a year and still have such ridiculous hair?As a public service, the Los Angeles Times recently dispatched me to investigate this continuing fashion conundrum.Among my discoveries:Ancient Egyptian mummies wore hairpieces.The National Enquirer once ran this headline: "Bald Burt Reynolds Almost Blinded as Toupee Catches Fire."
NEWS
By Katherine Marks and Katherine Marks,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 16, 1996
Exhibits at the American Institute of Asian Art are funded by a strange currency of sorts -- human hair.It's a marriage of practicality, says Wang Hong, the Chinese immigrant who owns both the art gallery and the hair-importing business -- Hi Tong International Inc. -- on bustling U.S. 40 near Rogers Avenue in Ellicott City. He taps the lucrative hair-extension market in the United States to help struggling Chinese artists.Wang's hair business may be foreign to many Americans, but in such countries as China, India and Indonesia, buying hair goes back at least 100 years, he said.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1994
The way Dennis Fallon sees the Baltimore-Washington area, there are a lot of men out there needlessly suffering the bane of hair loss, baldness and wigs that just won't stay put.Mr. Fallon, and the company he works for, Kansas City, Mo.-based Apollo International, believe all that lost hair could be found money.That's why Apollo, which develops and markets non-surgical human hair additions and hair care products, recently opened its northeast headquarters in Columbia. The office will serve Apollo salons from Northern Virginia to Boston.
FEATURES
By John Hughes and John Hughes,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | February 19, 1992
The guy goes shiny on top, gets some woman's hair sewn into what's left of his own, admits it to millions on late-night television and makes enough dough from his hair-brained idea to live where he wants to when he wants to.It's a goofy world, isn't it?"
FEATURES
By Tracy Achor Hayes and Tracy Achor Hayes,Dallas Morning News | September 10, 1992
Back in the '50s and '60s, fashion was all about artifice. Fake fingernails, lashes and even foam-pad falsies were some girls' best friends.Now a new emphasis on retro-glamour has brought back many of the beauty tricks of the past. But even though some of the items are the same, the attitude is light-years away from '50s-think. This time, it's not "I need," it's "Why not?"The last thing we're suggesting is that these beauty impostors be taken seriously. But as an amusing way to change your image for just a night, or to try something different without the commitment and expense of more permanent methods, faking it is fashion's version of let's pretend.
FEATURES
By Tracy Achor Hayes and Tracy Achor Hayes,Dallas Morning News | September 10, 1992
Back in the '50s and '60s, fashion was all about artifice. Fake fingernails, lashes and even foam-pad falsies were some girls' best friends.Now a new emphasis on retro-glamour has brought back many of the beauty tricks of the past. But even though some of the items are the same, the attitude is light-years away from '50s-think. This time, it's not "I need," it's "Why not?"The last thing we're suggesting is that these beauty impostors be taken seriously. But as an amusing way to change your image for just a night, or to try something different without the commitment and expense of more permanent methods, faking it is fashion's version of let's pretend.
FEATURES
By John Hughes and John Hughes,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | February 19, 1992
The guy goes shiny on top, gets some woman's hair sewn into what's left of his own, admits it to millions on late-night television and makes enough dough from his hair-brained idea to live where he wants to when he wants to.It's a goofy world, isn't it?"
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