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Human Genetics

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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 26, 2007
Dr. Maimon M. Cohen, a leader in the development of medical genetics and first director of the Harvey Institute for Human Genetics at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died of gastric cancer yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pikesville resident was 72. In 1997, Dr. Cohen joined GBMC as director of the genetics center that conducts research on adult diseases with genetic links, such as diabetes, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, some types of cancer and heart disease. "Dr. Maimon Cohen was an incredible leader and a wonderful human being.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
Every time a woman is tested for gene mutations linked to significantly higher rates of breast and ovarian cancer, her blood is sent to a lab in Utah. That's because Salt Lake City-based Myriad Genetics Inc. owns the patents to the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations, giving it control over all research and testing done nationwide. The company charges thousands of dollars for each set of results. The patents have become the subject of a legal fight that could soon head to the U.S. Supreme Court and have sparked a broader discussion about the fast-evolving field of genomics and so-called personalized medicine, in which treatments are tailored based on a patient's genetic makeup.
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NEWS
February 3, 2000
Mary Cantwell, 69, who wrote essays, books and editorials for the New York Times, many about the changing public and private lives of women in the United States, died of cancer Tuesday at New York University Medical Center in Manhattan. As a member of the Times editorial board for 16 years, Ms. Cantwell wrote often about issues affecting women. A notable one concerned "the squeal rule," the label she coined for a 1982 Reagan administration proposal to forbid giving contraceptives to teen-agers unless their parents were informed.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2008
Pam Engel tried something new with her biology students last year at Glen Burnie High School. Instead of talking about how diseases and traits are passed on through family members, she teamed up with a doctor to help students create their own family trees. Students had to list three generations and include medical conditions such as diabetes and heart disease, along with causes of death. Then they had to act as genetics counselors and predict which conditions might be passed on in their families.
NEWS
October 28, 2005
AWARDS William C. Erickson William C. Erickson, a retired professor of astronomy at the University of Maryland, College Park, has been awarded the Grote Reber Medal by the Queen Victoria Museum in Launceston, Tasmania. Erickson, who served on the faculty at College Park from 1963 to 1988, was honored for his innovative lifetime contributions to radio astronomy, including novel technology that foreshadowed the latest generation of meter-wavelength radio telescopes. Currently, Erickson operates his own private radio observatory on Bruny Island in the southernmost Australian state.
NEWS
By From staff reports | October 29, 1997
A $700,000 federal grant will help 35 low-income, high school dropouts earn equivalency diplomas while they rehabilitate four West Baltimore rowhouses, U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski announced yesterday.The Maryland Democrat said the youths will learn construction skills while rehabilitating the rowhouses in Sandtown-Winchester owned by Sandtown Habitat for Humanity. The homes will be sold to low-income families.The program is operated by Sandtown Habitat for Humanity, Community Building Partnership and Living Classrooms Foundation.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | January 23, 2006
Dr. Samuel Huntington "Ned" Boyer IV, a retired Johns Hopkins research scientist who did early genetic studies and was later active in liberal Democratic Party circles, died Saturday of complications after surgery related to lung cancer. The Ruxton resident, who was 81, died at St. Joseph Medical Center. Dr. Boyer's initial studies, made nearly 35 years ago, provided the basis for breakthrough therapies for blood disorders such as sickle cell disease, his colleagues said yesterday. He was also the last editor of The Johns Hopkins Medical Journal, which ceased publication in 1982.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie | September 15, 1992
UM dean emphasizes technology transferOnly a few days into her new job as dean of the combined University of Maryland graduate schools in Baltimore and Balti- more County, Joann A. Boughman was giving new emphasis to technology transfer -- the fine art of getting faculty research commercialized.Last week she beefed up the technology transfer office, assigning a full-time person to handle marketing and business communications. In addition, she said several legal interns will work with staff lawyers on patent and licensing issues.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2008
Pam Engel tried something new with her biology students last year at Glen Burnie High School. Instead of talking about how diseases and traits are passed on through family members, she teamed up with a doctor to help students create their own family trees. Students had to list three generations and include medical conditions such as diabetes and heart disease, along with causes of death. Then they had to act as genetics counselors and predict which conditions might be passed on in their families.
NEWS
July 28, 2008
Genes can't explain all human behavior David P. Barash is a superb scientist but a lousy sociologist ("Monkeying with evolution," Commentary, July 24). As a historian of science, I fully accept the evolutionary explanation of human origins and the idea that our genes influence everything from eye color to temperament. But I also recognize the fallacy in Mr. Barash's argument. Science is not simply an apolitical search for truth. Seemingly objective criteria such as race and measures of cogitation are riddled with subjective cultural assumptions.
NEWS
July 28, 2008
Genes can't explain all human behavior David P. Barash is a superb scientist but a lousy sociologist ("Monkeying with evolution," Commentary, July 24). As a historian of science, I fully accept the evolutionary explanation of human origins and the idea that our genes influence everything from eye color to temperament. But I also recognize the fallacy in Mr. Barash's argument. Science is not simply an apolitical search for truth. Seemingly objective criteria such as race and measures of cogitation are riddled with subjective cultural assumptions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 26, 2007
Dr. Maimon M. Cohen, a leader in the development of medical genetics and first director of the Harvey Institute for Human Genetics at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died of gastric cancer yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pikesville resident was 72. In 1997, Dr. Cohen joined GBMC as director of the genetics center that conducts research on adult diseases with genetic links, such as diabetes, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, some types of cancer and heart disease. "Dr. Maimon Cohen was an incredible leader and a wonderful human being.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | January 23, 2006
Dr. Samuel Huntington "Ned" Boyer IV, a retired Johns Hopkins research scientist who did early genetic studies and was later active in liberal Democratic Party circles, died Saturday of complications after surgery related to lung cancer. The Ruxton resident, who was 81, died at St. Joseph Medical Center. Dr. Boyer's initial studies, made nearly 35 years ago, provided the basis for breakthrough therapies for blood disorders such as sickle cell disease, his colleagues said yesterday. He was also the last editor of The Johns Hopkins Medical Journal, which ceased publication in 1982.
NEWS
October 28, 2005
AWARDS William C. Erickson William C. Erickson, a retired professor of astronomy at the University of Maryland, College Park, has been awarded the Grote Reber Medal by the Queen Victoria Museum in Launceston, Tasmania. Erickson, who served on the faculty at College Park from 1963 to 1988, was honored for his innovative lifetime contributions to radio astronomy, including novel technology that foreshadowed the latest generation of meter-wavelength radio telescopes. Currently, Erickson operates his own private radio observatory on Bruny Island in the southernmost Australian state.
NEWS
February 3, 2000
Mary Cantwell, 69, who wrote essays, books and editorials for the New York Times, many about the changing public and private lives of women in the United States, died of cancer Tuesday at New York University Medical Center in Manhattan. As a member of the Times editorial board for 16 years, Ms. Cantwell wrote often about issues affecting women. A notable one concerned "the squeal rule," the label she coined for a 1982 Reagan administration proposal to forbid giving contraceptives to teen-agers unless their parents were informed.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | January 14, 2000
Scientists in Oregon have announced the birth of a cloned rhesus monkey that could be the first of many genetically identical primates raised for conscription into the fight against human disease. The monkey, named Tetra, was one of a set of quadruplets created by splitting a rhesus embryo that had grown to eight cells. The identical quads were then implanted in the wombs of two surrogate mothers. It is a technique used before in mice and farm animals, but never in a primate. The breakthrough would appear to bring science a step closer to the skills needed to clone another primate -- humans.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
Every time a woman is tested for gene mutations linked to significantly higher rates of breast and ovarian cancer, her blood is sent to a lab in Utah. That's because Salt Lake City-based Myriad Genetics Inc. owns the patents to the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations, giving it control over all research and testing done nationwide. The company charges thousands of dollars for each set of results. The patents have become the subject of a legal fight that could soon head to the U.S. Supreme Court and have sparked a broader discussion about the fast-evolving field of genomics and so-called personalized medicine, in which treatments are tailored based on a patient's genetic makeup.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | January 14, 2000
Scientists in Oregon have announced the birth of a cloned rhesus monkey that could be the first of many genetically identical primates raised for conscription into the fight against human disease. The monkey, named Tetra, was one of a set of quadruplets created by splitting a rhesus embryo that had grown to eight cells. The identical quads were then implanted in the wombs of two surrogate mothers. It is a technique used before in mice and farm animals, but never in a primate. The breakthrough would appear to bring science a step closer to the skills needed to clone another primate -- humans.
NEWS
By From staff reports | October 29, 1997
A $700,000 federal grant will help 35 low-income, high school dropouts earn equivalency diplomas while they rehabilitate four West Baltimore rowhouses, U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski announced yesterday.The Maryland Democrat said the youths will learn construction skills while rehabilitating the rowhouses in Sandtown-Winchester owned by Sandtown Habitat for Humanity. The homes will be sold to low-income families.The program is operated by Sandtown Habitat for Humanity, Community Building Partnership and Living Classrooms Foundation.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie | September 15, 1992
UM dean emphasizes technology transferOnly a few days into her new job as dean of the combined University of Maryland graduate schools in Baltimore and Balti- more County, Joann A. Boughman was giving new emphasis to technology transfer -- the fine art of getting faculty research commercialized.Last week she beefed up the technology transfer office, assigning a full-time person to handle marketing and business communications. In addition, she said several legal interns will work with staff lawyers on patent and licensing issues.
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