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By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2001
EIGHTY-SEVEN YEARS ago, she was one of 6,500 schoolchildren proudly holding a brightly colored card in the air while photographers from throughout the area snapped their picture. Blanche Huber, who will be 98 this month and lives at the Westminster Nursing and Rehabilitative Center, might not remember many details about that September day in 1914. But her lifelong pride at being part of the first human flag at Fort McHenry in Baltimore endures. "I remember being out on a boat," she said, her clear blue eyes looking off into the distance as she recalled details of that day. "It wasn't raining.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Myrtle Sanders was just a month old when she and her mother visited Fort McHenry with thousands of others to form the Human Flag in 1914 - 100 years after the British bombardment of Fort McHenry during the War of 1812. On Tuesday, the 100-year-old Lochearn resident was back, along with 6,600 schoolchildren, teachers and others from across Maryland to form the Star-Spangled Banner Living Flag, a visual kickoff for the seven-day Star-Spangled Spectacular festival commemorating the national anthem's bicentennial.
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NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1998
A HUMAN FLAG measuring 130 feet by 230 feet stretched across the grassy expanse at Fort McHenry in Baltimore Thursday. The flag was created by about 3,000 elementary school pupils from across Maryland.Participating in the "Living American Flag" was a patriotic and educational experience for third-, fourth- and fifth-graders representing about 80 of Maryland's public, private and parochial schools.Ten pupils from Freedom Elementary School earned the opportunity to participate by writing essays titled "What the Flag Means to Me."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | December 14, 2006
Myrtle M. Greenwood, who volunteered at Greater Baltimore Medical Center for more than 30 years and had been a member of the Sefton Avenue Buddies, died in her sleep Friday at Good Samaritan Nursing Center. She was 105. A Baltimore native, she was born Myrtle Minton on Nov. 5, 1901. "She was born near the old Lutheran Hospital in East Baltimore and raised at Lanvale and Dukeland streets. She lived in that house until 1938, when she moved to the 6100 block of Sefton Ave. in Hamilton," said a daughter, Ruth "Rudy" Bixler of Glen Arm. "Since 2001, she has been living at the nursing home."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2001
LaVerne Beckstrom-Smith, one of the few surviving participants in the first Human Flag ceremony at Fort McHenry in 1914, died Tuesday of heart failure at Mercy Hospice in downtown Baltimore. She was 97. Mrs. Beckstrom-Smith lived for 60 years in a large Victorian house on Chestnut Hill Avenue in Northeast Baltimore until she moved to Christ Church Harbor Apartments in 1996. The former LaVerne Horton was born and raised in South Baltimore and was a 10-year-old pupil at a city school when she participated in the first Human Flag celebration Sept.
NEWS
By Miranda Barnes and Miranda Barnes,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 24, 1996
For two hours yesterday, Fort McHenry became the largest classroom in Maryland.About 3,000 young students became part of history when they assembled near the water and held up red, white and blue poster boards to form a living American flag.The National Flag Day Foundation invited elementary BTC schoolchildren and a few middle school students from around the state to participate in a Maryland tradition dating to 1914, when Ella Baker was part of the first Human Flag, as it was called then.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 15, 1994
The date was Sept. 14, 1914. All the eyes in Baltimore were fixed on Fort McHenry. It was the 100th anniversary of "The Star-Spangled Banner."It was the day of the Human Flag. Thousands of school children, dressed in either red, white or blue, assembled on the side of a small hill near the fort's walls. They formed a living flag.A few years ago, a Human Flag survivors club was formed to hold a reunion for the original participants. All eight of those able to make it met yesterday at the fort.
NEWS
By Elisha King and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff | June 5, 1991
William Blount, 12, held his red cardboard square as high as he could, hoping that U.S. soldiers, possibly watching on television, would see how proudly he held his part of the American flag.Blount was one of about 4,000 Maryland students who formed a human flag yesterday morning at Fort McHenry, as part of a commemorative ceremony honoring the bombardment of the site and Francis Scott Key's writing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" in 1814."I think they will feel good when they see this because they fought to hold up the flag.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang | June 5, 1991
Catrice Green, a student at Rosemont Elementary School, thought it was just great being a part of a stripe in the American flag."I feel like I am a star," said Shanee Monroe, a senior at City College and president of the student council who was one of the flag's stars. "To be any part of this celebration for the flag is a lifelong experience."An estimated 3,400 elementary and high school students agreed yesterday that being a part of a human flag was exciting, fun and quite a privilege.The students from the Baltimore area, as well as teachers and other volunteers, held up red, white and blue placards to create a 117-foot-by-262-foot flag as part of the Living Flag Ceremony at Fort McHenry.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | December 7, 1993
Lilian Schueler Pillard, who participated in the first human flag celebration in 1914 and the celebration of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad's 100th birthday, died Nov. 22 of internal bleeding at St. Joseph Hospital.She was 91 and had been a resident of the Glen Meadows Retirement Community in Glen Arm since moving there in 1987.She carried one of the stars of the American flag during the Star-Spangled Banner Centennial Celebration at Fort McHenry in 1914. She was one of 6,500 schoolchildren who made up the human flag.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2004
Gladys C. Stavely, a retired Baltimore public school educator who was thought to be one of the last surviving participants of the original Human Flag ceremony staged at Fort McHenry in 1914, died of a urinary infection Sunday at the Wesley Home in Mount Washington. She was 100. She was born Gladys Cooper and raised in an East Baltimore rowhouse at 1624 Washington St. Mrs. Stavely was 10 and a pupil at public school No. 99, the Columbus School on Washington Street, when she joined with 6,500 other Baltimore schoolchildren to form a human flag at Fort McHenry.
NEWS
January 21, 2002
George W. Alt Jr., 91, business manager, veteran George W. Alt Jr., former general manager of Sullivan Business Forms in Washington, died of pneumonia Jan. 14 at Sinai Hospital. He was 91. Mr. Alt, who formerly had lived at Leisure World facilities in Gaithersburg and Bethesda, had resided since 1998 at Wesley Home Inc. in Mount Washington. Mr. Alt retired in 1972 from Sullivan Business Forms, where he had been general manager for 12 years. Born and raised in the Arlington section of Baltimore, he was a graduate of city public schools.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2001
EIGHTY-SEVEN YEARS ago, she was one of 6,500 schoolchildren proudly holding a brightly colored card in the air while photographers from throughout the area snapped their picture. Blanche Huber, who will be 98 this month and lives at the Westminster Nursing and Rehabilitative Center, might not remember many details about that September day in 1914. But her lifelong pride at being part of the first human flag at Fort McHenry in Baltimore endures. "I remember being out on a boat," she said, her clear blue eyes looking off into the distance as she recalled details of that day. "It wasn't raining.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2001
LaVerne Beckstrom-Smith, one of the few surviving participants in the first Human Flag ceremony at Fort McHenry in 1914, died Tuesday of heart failure at Mercy Hospice in downtown Baltimore. She was 97. Mrs. Beckstrom-Smith lived for 60 years in a large Victorian house on Chestnut Hill Avenue in Northeast Baltimore until she moved to Christ Church Harbor Apartments in 1996. The former LaVerne Horton was born and raised in South Baltimore and was a 10-year-old pupil at a city school when she participated in the first Human Flag celebration Sept.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1998
A HUMAN FLAG measuring 130 feet by 230 feet stretched across the grassy expanse at Fort McHenry in Baltimore Thursday. The flag was created by about 3,000 elementary school pupils from across Maryland.Participating in the "Living American Flag" was a patriotic and educational experience for third-, fourth- and fifth-graders representing about 80 of Maryland's public, private and parochial schools.Ten pupils from Freedom Elementary School earned the opportunity to participate by writing essays titled "What the Flag Means to Me."
NEWS
By Miranda Barnes and Miranda Barnes,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 24, 1996
For two hours yesterday, Fort McHenry became the largest classroom in Maryland.About 3,000 young students became part of history when they assembled near the water and held up red, white and blue poster boards to form a living American flag.The National Flag Day Foundation invited elementary BTC schoolchildren and a few middle school students from around the state to participate in a Maryland tradition dating to 1914, when Ella Baker was part of the first Human Flag, as it was called then.
NEWS
January 21, 2002
George W. Alt Jr., 91, business manager, veteran George W. Alt Jr., former general manager of Sullivan Business Forms in Washington, died of pneumonia Jan. 14 at Sinai Hospital. He was 91. Mr. Alt, who formerly had lived at Leisure World facilities in Gaithersburg and Bethesda, had resided since 1998 at Wesley Home Inc. in Mount Washington. Mr. Alt retired in 1972 from Sullivan Business Forms, where he had been general manager for 12 years. Born and raised in the Arlington section of Baltimore, he was a graduate of city public schools.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Myrtle Sanders was just a month old when she and her mother visited Fort McHenry with thousands of others to form the Human Flag in 1914 - 100 years after the British bombardment of Fort McHenry during the War of 1812. On Tuesday, the 100-year-old Lochearn resident was back, along with 6,600 schoolchildren, teachers and others from across Maryland to form the Star-Spangled Banner Living Flag, a visual kickoff for the seven-day Star-Spangled Spectacular festival commemorating the national anthem's bicentennial.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 15, 1994
The date was Sept. 14, 1914. All the eyes in Baltimore were fixed on Fort McHenry. It was the 100th anniversary of "The Star-Spangled Banner."It was the day of the Human Flag. Thousands of school children, dressed in either red, white or blue, assembled on the side of a small hill near the fort's walls. They formed a living flag.A few years ago, a Human Flag survivors club was formed to hold a reunion for the original participants. All eight of those able to make it met yesterday at the fort.
NEWS
July 10, 1994
Henry P. NollUpholstererHenry P. Noll, a retired upholsterer who participated in the first Human Flag pageant at Fort McHenry in 1914, died June 16 of heart failure at his Hamilton residence. He was 89.Even though he was too young to be eligible for the Star-Spangled Banner human flag celebration that featured 6,500 city school children, he kept begging a teacher who finally permitted him to appear in the ceremony, said Joan McKew, a daughter who lives in Perry Hall. He had been a guest at each annual ceremony since 1984.
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