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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 24, 1997
The theme of "The Figure Within" at Halcyon Gallery makes this show sound intriguing. It's an exhibit of the work of five artists who combine abstraction with imagery of the human figure. Since abstraction and the figure have co-existed through the art of the 20th century, such a theme could well produce a thought-provoking show.This one proves uneven, though. Three of the artists are strong and relate to the concept much better than the other two. Catherine Jones' paintings (all titled "Winter Path")
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HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Amy Lynne Shelton has a closet full of toys at the Johns Hopkins University cognitive psychology lab: Wooden human figures with movable joints, Lego and model train buildings, toy cameras and wooden triangular blocks — some with eyes, some without. Each has its role to play in research shedding light on the possible relationship of social grace and sense of physical space, work that might eventually help people who suffer the social difficulties common in autism spectrum disorder. Shelton, an associate professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, led a team that has published results in the Journal of Experimental Psychology and is ready to submit for publication a fresh round of trials adding new variables — and new toys — to the experiment.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 26, 1993
Both the sculptures of Karen Acker and the paintings of Emilio Cruz are based on the human figure and use somewhat unusual combinations of materials, and that's only the beginning of what they have in common.Cruz begins with long, narrow white birch panels which he covers with a layer of gesso. On this he then draws the human figure in charcoal and covers it with a layer of beeswax, into which he cuts deep lines to create additional drawing. Finally he adds paint.Acker combines porcelain, steel and sometimes wood into sculptures which also have reference to the human body.
BUSINESS
By Susan Tompor and Susan Tompor,Detroit Free Press | May 28, 2008
Sam E. Antar tells you straight out that white-collar criminals thrive by building a false wall of integrity. "Yes, we go to church and to synagogue and to mosque and to temple," Antar told a group of money professionals at the CFA Society of Detroit earlier this month. The criminal takes advantage of your humanity, he said, and considers it a weakness to be exploited. Be sure to take those words to heart if you want to avoid getting scammed out of your nest egg. For the crook, humanity - and its very foundation - are nothing but a way to work you over.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Amy Lynne Shelton has a closet full of toys at the Johns Hopkins University cognitive psychology lab: Wooden human figures with movable joints, Lego and model train buildings, toy cameras and wooden triangular blocks — some with eyes, some without. Each has its role to play in research shedding light on the possible relationship of social grace and sense of physical space, work that might eventually help people who suffer the social difficulties common in autism spectrum disorder. Shelton, an associate professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, led a team that has published results in the Journal of Experimental Psychology and is ready to submit for publication a fresh round of trials adding new variables — and new toys — to the experiment.
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By Fred Tasker and Fred Tasker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 1998
Picture this: Queen Elizabeth calls. She asks you to help design a gigantic new sculpture to debut in London on New Year's Eve, Year 2000. It's to be a massive, hollow sculpture of a persona, sort of a theme park to the human body that lets visitors zip through on escalators, exploring its parts, peering out of its eyes.And the queen wants to know: Should it be male or female? Or something else?Or, picture this: A U.S. West Coast PR man calls. He asks you to help design a "Statue of Responsibility" in California, aimed at providing a philosophical balance to the Statue of Liberty on the East Coast.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 15, 2006
From the ancient Greeks to the 20th-century modernists, the human figure has been the form through which artists have expressed their society's highest ideals -- religious, moral and ethical principles, notions of science and mathematics, even political and social philosophies. In the early modern era, however, with its turn toward nonrepresentational abstraction, it seemed for a time that traditional depictions of the body might have become obsolete. Cubism and dada, the most radical innovations of the first decades of the 20th century, both seemed to reject the very idea of realistic representation, along with the elaborate system of pictorial symbolism embodied in images of the human form.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 12, 1994
It's always easier to play it safe. Trace Miller, an artist with tons of talent, has at times left the impression of being satisfied with the tour de force painting replete with art historical references. They were good, but to some extent he was showing what he could do, not what he was.His recently opened show at Grimaldis reveals that he has taken a step forward. His new paintings are less immediately likable and more introspective. He retains the figure, but largely as a compositional device, for he has gone a long way toward abstraction in these works.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2008
In a sunny classroom at Howard County Center for the Arts on Tuesday morning, nine different images of 61-year-old Tom Lesko were emerging on drawing pads and canvases propped on desks and secured on easels around the room. Some artists were using broad pencil strokes to outline the shape of Lesko's arms and legs. Others were choosing the correct oil paint for the blue stripes in his shirt and the white strands in his hair. One was adding small strokes of watercolor to highlight the contours of his face.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | June 20, 2001
In ancient Athens, artists adorned buildings with sculptures of the human figure, called caryatids, that reflected the Greek ideal of beauty. In modern-day Baltimore, architects have collaborated with a Maryland sculptor to create four caryatids that reflect a different sort of ideal. The polished marble on the faces and hands is dark, in contrast to the light headdresses and robes. Two have broad noses and full lips that suggest an African-American heritage. The other two have features that seem European.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2008
In a sunny classroom at Howard County Center for the Arts on Tuesday morning, nine different images of 61-year-old Tom Lesko were emerging on drawing pads and canvases propped on desks and secured on easels around the room. Some artists were using broad pencil strokes to outline the shape of Lesko's arms and legs. Others were choosing the correct oil paint for the blue stripes in his shirt and the white strands in his hair. One was adding small strokes of watercolor to highlight the contours of his face.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 15, 2006
From the ancient Greeks to the 20th-century modernists, the human figure has been the form through which artists have expressed their society's highest ideals -- religious, moral and ethical principles, notions of science and mathematics, even political and social philosophies. In the early modern era, however, with its turn toward nonrepresentational abstraction, it seemed for a time that traditional depictions of the body might have become obsolete. Cubism and dada, the most radical innovations of the first decades of the 20th century, both seemed to reject the very idea of realistic representation, along with the elaborate system of pictorial symbolism embodied in images of the human form.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | June 20, 2001
In ancient Athens, artists adorned buildings with sculptures of the human figure, called caryatids, that reflected the Greek ideal of beauty. In modern-day Baltimore, architects have collaborated with a Maryland sculptor to create four caryatids that reflect a different sort of ideal. The polished marble on the faces and hands is dark, in contrast to the light headdresses and robes. Two have broad noses and full lips that suggest an African-American heritage. The other two have features that seem European.
FEATURES
By Fred Tasker and Fred Tasker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 1998
Picture this: Queen Elizabeth calls. She asks you to help design a gigantic new sculpture to debut in London on New Year's Eve, Year 2000. It's to be a massive, hollow sculpture of a persona, sort of a theme park to the human body that lets visitors zip through on escalators, exploring its parts, peering out of its eyes.And the queen wants to know: Should it be male or female? Or something else?Or, picture this: A U.S. West Coast PR man calls. He asks you to help design a "Statue of Responsibility" in California, aimed at providing a philosophical balance to the Statue of Liberty on the East Coast.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 24, 1997
The theme of "The Figure Within" at Halcyon Gallery makes this show sound intriguing. It's an exhibit of the work of five artists who combine abstraction with imagery of the human figure. Since abstraction and the figure have co-existed through the art of the 20th century, such a theme could well produce a thought-provoking show.This one proves uneven, though. Three of the artists are strong and relate to the concept much better than the other two. Catherine Jones' paintings (all titled "Winter Path")
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 12, 1994
It's always easier to play it safe. Trace Miller, an artist with tons of talent, has at times left the impression of being satisfied with the tour de force painting replete with art historical references. They were good, but to some extent he was showing what he could do, not what he was.His recently opened show at Grimaldis reveals that he has taken a step forward. His new paintings are less immediately likable and more introspective. He retains the figure, but largely as a compositional device, for he has gone a long way toward abstraction in these works.
BUSINESS
By Susan Tompor and Susan Tompor,Detroit Free Press | May 28, 2008
Sam E. Antar tells you straight out that white-collar criminals thrive by building a false wall of integrity. "Yes, we go to church and to synagogue and to mosque and to temple," Antar told a group of money professionals at the CFA Society of Detroit earlier this month. The criminal takes advantage of your humanity, he said, and considers it a weakness to be exploited. Be sure to take those words to heart if you want to avoid getting scammed out of your nest egg. For the crook, humanity - and its very foundation - are nothing but a way to work you over.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | August 27, 1998
Henry Moore, one of the most famous sculptors of the 20th century, developed a visual language that explored the relationship between abstraction and representation, especially with regard to the human form. Aside from sculpture, he was also known for drawings and prints. An exhibit of 27 of his prints and five maquettes (or small-scale models for sculptures) opens tomorrow at the Mitchell Gallery of St. John's College in Annapolis. As with his sculpture, the primary subject of these works is the human figure, but some works also reflect his interest in animals, including prints of elephant heads and sheep.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 26, 1993
Both the sculptures of Karen Acker and the paintings of Emilio Cruz are based on the human figure and use somewhat unusual combinations of materials, and that's only the beginning of what they have in common.Cruz begins with long, narrow white birch panels which he covers with a layer of gesso. On this he then draws the human figure in charcoal and covers it with a layer of beeswax, into which he cuts deep lines to create additional drawing. Finally he adds paint.Acker combines porcelain, steel and sometimes wood into sculptures which also have reference to the human body.
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