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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | December 2, 1993
Say contemporary German art to most people and they think neo-expressionism. They aren't wrong, but the show of contemporary German prints now at Grimaldis demonstrates clearly that the spectrum is wider than that.There's ample expressionism, of course, by the likes of Georg Baselitz, Markus Lupertz and others.But while expressionism often reflects the darker side of human experience, there is some levity here.There's an element of humor in the shapes of Baselitz's "Nurse"; and while "Brett" reveals Baselitz's well-known upside-down figure, there's a hint of the witty caricature about this work.
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Editorial from The Aegis | February 4, 2014
Just when most of us are becoming accustomed to marking dated items with 2014, the year just ended will be in all-too-sharp focus for a day or two in the coming weeks for most people. It's tax season and that means it's time to start at least thinking about those 2013 tax forms. As usual, the deadline to file falls in mid-April, Tuesday, April 15. Starting about now as most people are receiving the W-2 forms that report annual income along with various other tax documents, the prospect of a day of navigating the twisted language of the instruction booklets looms large.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | January 3, 2013
The season for singing about a white Christmas, sleigh rides with jingle bells, Frosty the Snowman and the delights of a fire when the weather is frightful has largely passed, but over the next few weeks, such thoughts and images will become increasingly relevant. Ice skating, snow and winter sports are a big part of the holiday season's lore, but, at least in these parts, not so much a part of reality. White Christmases are few and far between, coming about 20 percent of the time if you count dustings like the one experienced on the most recent Eve of the Nativity.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | January 3, 2013
The season for singing about a white Christmas, sleigh rides with jingle bells, Frosty the Snowman and the delights of a fire when the weather is frightful has largely passed, but over the next few weeks, such thoughts and images will become increasingly relevant. Ice skating, snow and winter sports are a big part of the holiday season's lore, but, at least in these parts, not so much a part of reality. White Christmases are few and far between, coming about 20 percent of the time if you count dustings like the one experienced on the most recent Eve of the Nativity.
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By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | January 25, 1995
The 1964 New York World's Fair was a disaster from day one. Fewer than 100,000 of a predicted 250,000 people attended the opening. The ceremony itself was a near-fiasco with miserable, rainy weather, chanting protesters and a droning helicopter that forced President Johnson to stop his speech.The New York executives who dreamed up the fair had been inspired by the greatness of the 1939 World's Fair. (Yet the 1939 fair wasn't all that great, since it paid its investors only 30 cents on the dollar.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 4, 2014
Just when most of us are becoming accustomed to marking dated items with 2014, the year just ended will be in all-too-sharp focus for a day or two in the coming weeks for most people. It's tax season and that means it's time to start at least thinking about those 2013 tax forms. As usual, the deadline to file falls in mid-April, Tuesday, April 15. Starting about now as most people are receiving the W-2 forms that report annual income along with various other tax documents, the prospect of a day of navigating the twisted language of the instruction booklets looms large.
NEWS
By C. W. Gusewelle | March 1, 1994
A GROUNDSWELL of objection is building among readers and viewers of the news, and even among some journalists, to the unrelievedly bleak depiction of human affairs in the mainstream media.The world they see represented on their television screens and in the pages of their newspapers -- a world dominated by violence, deviancy, ungoverned venality and cynicism -- is not the one that most of them inhabit.Increasingly the press and TV alike have come to be viewed as prurient in their interests, fascinated by the sensational and the aberrant, indifferent to the interests and the experience of ordinary readers and willing to manipulate reality to serve various social or political agendas.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer ! | August 9, 1992
Tom Brandau knows what he'll be watchingCan two old men take on eight hormone-driven kids?Tom Brandau plans to find out Wednesday when his film, "Sonny & Cornblatt," makes its TV debut against Fox 45's popular "Melrose Place."Never mind that Mr. Brandau works as a producer-director for WBFF, the Fox TV station here. He's clear about what he and his friends will be watching." 'Sonny & Cornblatt,' " he says. "There's even a little bit of sex in it. Or at least an inference of sex."The half-hour comedy-drama, which airs on Maryland Public Television at 9 p.m., focuses on two widowers from different worlds who become friends.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 6, 2002
With dozens of ordinary wooden chairs, 29-year-old Marc Robinson creates a powerful work that breaks with the pictorial tradition of African-American art while retaining its political agenda. Robinson's sculpture is part of a master of fine arts thesis exhibit at the Maryland Institute College of Art featuring the work of three young African-American artists. In addition to Robinson, the show, on view through tomorrow at the Decker Gallery in the Mount Royal Station building, presents paintings by Tonya Ingersol and installation and sculpture by Amana J. Johnson.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 26, 1993
Both the sculptures of Karen Acker and the paintings of Emilio Cruz are based on the human figure and use somewhat unusual combinations of materials, and that's only the beginning of what they have in common.Cruz begins with long, narrow white birch panels which he covers with a layer of gesso. On this he then draws the human figure in charcoal and covers it with a layer of beeswax, into which he cuts deep lines to create additional drawing. Finally he adds paint.Acker combines porcelain, steel and sometimes wood into sculptures which also have reference to the human body.
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By LAURA DEMANSKI and LAURA DEMANSKI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2005
The Sea John Banville Alfred A. Knopf / 199 pages Faced with the relentless approach of old age, the protagonist of John Banville's Man Booker Prize-winning novel The Sea plunges with headstrong nostalgia into the past. Obsessed with memory in the immediate aftermath of his wife's death from cancer, Max Morden picks up his life entire and moves it to the seaside town where he grew up and where his imagination was captured by a well-to-do family, the Graces. Narrating the present, the near past and the deep past by turns, Max is memory's willing captive.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2005
Tom Block When a committee at Howard County Center for the Arts pulled together an exhibit of figurative art, the result was a show that explores the human experience along with the human form. Tom Block of Silver Spring makes large, boldly colored portraits that depict individuals involved in the struggle for human rights around the world. Jessica Damen of Baltimore paints colorful, textured works focused on children and the experiences of growing up. The two Maryland artists are joined by Nebraska artist Kristin Powers Nowlin, who uses embroidery and printmaking to examine cultural identity, and Randy Simmons of Kentucky, who makes large, detailed charcoal drawings of children.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 6, 2002
With dozens of ordinary wooden chairs, 29-year-old Marc Robinson creates a powerful work that breaks with the pictorial tradition of African-American art while retaining its political agenda. Robinson's sculpture is part of a master of fine arts thesis exhibit at the Maryland Institute College of Art featuring the work of three young African-American artists. In addition to Robinson, the show, on view through tomorrow at the Decker Gallery in the Mount Royal Station building, presents paintings by Tonya Ingersol and installation and sculpture by Amana J. Johnson.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
As scientists looked on, the healthy young volunteer pumped away on a stationary bicycle in a laboratory. He huffed into the mouthpiece of an air-monitoring machine as plastic tubes looped from the blood vessels of his legs. A technical problem caused the researchers to call off the experiment. When the sweaty 24-year-old man climbed off to rest, he complained that his head ached, his heart was beating rapidly, and he felt chilly, feverish and stiff. After he was wheeled to the emergency room of the Baltimore VA Medical Center on a gurney, doctors discovered that he had a life-threatening bacterial infection of the bloodstream.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 18, 2001
In the luminous paintings of 29-year-old Indian artist Dhruvi Acharya, cartoon-like thought bubbles rise from the heads of people and streams of arrows issue from their mouths. These graphic references to the processes of speech and communication, which in Acharya's art are a source of mystery as well as of clarity in human interaction, seem as much the subject of the artist's paintings as the enchantingly drawn figures and objects they contain. Acharya's work, at the Gomez Gallery through Feb. 3, is a visual and emotional diary of her dual life in India and the United States, an allegorical arena in which ancient tradition confronts contemporary consumer society.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff | December 19, 1999
Six months ago, on these pages, I examined the expanding marketplace of books by and about African-Americans. This assignment has been far more difficult, and fun: Wade into the floodwaters, and return with a few well-written books that enhance understanding of the African-American and human experience -- and which illustrate the main categories in which African-American literature may best be examined.I avoided the obvious. I'll read anything by Walter Mosley, Octavia Butler, Maya Angelou, and newcomer Edwidge Danticat, winners of laurels.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2005
Tom Block When a committee at Howard County Center for the Arts pulled together an exhibit of figurative art, the result was a show that explores the human experience along with the human form. Tom Block of Silver Spring makes large, boldly colored portraits that depict individuals involved in the struggle for human rights around the world. Jessica Damen of Baltimore paints colorful, textured works focused on children and the experiences of growing up. The two Maryland artists are joined by Nebraska artist Kristin Powers Nowlin, who uses embroidery and printmaking to examine cultural identity, and Randy Simmons of Kentucky, who makes large, detailed charcoal drawings of children.
NEWS
By LAURA DEMANSKI and LAURA DEMANSKI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2005
The Sea John Banville Alfred A. Knopf / 199 pages Faced with the relentless approach of old age, the protagonist of John Banville's Man Booker Prize-winning novel The Sea plunges with headstrong nostalgia into the past. Obsessed with memory in the immediate aftermath of his wife's death from cancer, Max Morden picks up his life entire and moves it to the seaside town where he grew up and where his imagination was captured by a well-to-do family, the Graces. Narrating the present, the near past and the deep past by turns, Max is memory's willing captive.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 15, 1998
Leos Janacek's "The Cunning Little Vixen" is often called a children's opera.It's a fairy tale set in a forest in which animals talk and understand the language of humans. The opera, which will be performed by Peabody Opera Theatre Nov. 19-22, is charming, funny and simple enough for a child to follow. A baby vixen is captured by a gamekeeper; she grows up and, after killing the forester's chickens, escapes to the forest, where she meets and marries a handsome fox. Though she eventually dies, she leaves behind a brood of fox cubs, including a cunning little vixen.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 8, 1997
"Child, I feel like I've known you all my life," centenarian Sadie Delany told playwright and director Emily Mann on the first afternoon they spent together.Mann was visiting Sadie and her sister Bessie while researching the play "Having Our Say," which went on to become one of the hits of the 1994-1995 Broadway season and is now on a national tour. (It arrives at the Mechanic Theatre tonight.)Adapted from the memoir written by Sarah ("Sadie") L. Delany and A. Elizabeth ("Bessie") Delany with writer Amy Hill Hearth, "Having Our Say" is Mann's two-person drama, which quietly and movingly relates 100 years of American history.
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