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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 2004
At a pivotal time in human evolution, about 2.4 million years ago, a muscle gene underwent a disabling alteration. And scientists say this could have made all the difference, leading to the enlarged brains of the lineage that evolved into modern humans. Researchers who made the discovery said this might be the first recognized functional genetic difference between humans and the apes that can be correlated with anatomical changes in the fossil record. As they said: The gene mutation might represent the beginning of the ancestral triumph of brain over brawn.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Baltimore native Peyton List, who got her start on "As the World Turns" and most recently appeared on "90210" and "Mad Men," has landed the starring role in a pilot for The CW. According to Deadline Hollywood , List, 26, will play the part of Cara in "The Tomorrow People," an adaptation of a British sci-fi drama about young people with special powers who represent the next phase of human evolution. The show is a collaboration between writer/director Greg Berlanti, who created "Everwood," and Julie Plec, who produced "The Vampire Diaries.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Baltimore native Peyton List, who got her start on "As the World Turns" and most recently appeared on "90210" and "Mad Men," has landed the starring role in a pilot for The CW. According to Deadline Hollywood , List, 26, will play the part of Cara in "The Tomorrow People," an adaptation of a British sci-fi drama about young people with special powers who represent the next phase of human evolution. The show is a collaboration between writer/director Greg Berlanti, who created "Everwood," and Julie Plec, who produced "The Vampire Diaries.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | December 11, 2007
Human evolution is speeding up - and humans on different continents are becoming increasingly different, researchers say. The pace of evolutionary change has accelerated since humans wandered out of Africa thousands of years ago, with evidence in the way people in different parts of the world digest milk, make vitamin D from sunlight and fight off diseases such as HIV, according to researchers at the University of Utah. Scientists examined 3.9 million snippets of DNA from 270 people representing four different groups - Han Chinese, Japanese, Africa's Yoruba tribe and Northern Europeans - and found patterns showing evidence of recent natural selection in 1,800 genes.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 1997
Bigger, in evolutionary terms, may not be better.New research lends support to a recent scientific idea that modern humanity might be the product of an evolutionary decline - in body size.The reason, says John Kappelman, a University of Texas paleoanthropologist who was one of the first to raise the idea, might be that evolution has selected for cooperation and communication instead of brawn.The new research by scientists at the Johns Hopkins University and Kappelman's commentary on it appear in last week's issue of the British journal Nature.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
Donna and Mike McDonough nearly demolished their kitchen searching for a slithery black snake that had accidentally made its way into their Perry Hall home. Mary Knauer, sick with a cold and running out of tissues, huddled in her pajamas and blew her nose on her sheets just to avoid the snakes she imagined lurked under her childhood bed. And Pam Goode didn't speak to her daughter Lauryn for weeks after the 17-year-old gave her a writhing 2-foot-long python as a gag gift one Hanukkah. No matter how rational we normally are, when you throw a slinky, slippery serpent into the equation, cue the shuddering and prepare for an instant reduction to raw emotion and knee-jerk reactions.
NEWS
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,CHICAGO TRIUBNE | September 9, 2005
CHICAGO - New research suggests that the human brain is still evolving, a process that may ultimately increase people's capacity to grow smarter. Two key brain-building genes, which underwent drastic changes in the past that coincided with huge leaps in human intellectual development, are still undergoing rapid mutations, evolution's way of selecting for new beneficial traits, Bruce Lahn and his colleagues at the University of Chicago reported in today's...
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
Researchers taking a second look at skull fragments in an Ethiopian museum have made a startling discovery: They're the oldest remains of modern human ever found. Tests on two partial skulls unearthed from wind-swept rock formations on opposite sides of Ethiopia's Omo River show that both are 195,000 years old - which pushes back the earliest known date for the emergence of modern humans by 35,000 years. In a report published today in the journal Nature, researchers say their new age estimates are based on dating techniques far more precise than those available when paleontologist Richard E. Leakey and colleagues unearthed the skulls in 1967.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 8, 1996
BEIJING -- After yielding Java Man and Peking Man earlier this century, East Asia almost dropped off the map for archaeologists searching for clues to human evolution.But the region's recent period of peace and stability has allowed archaeologists to start digging again, turning up a series of discoveries that is forcing a fundamental reassessment of how humans evolved.Strands of evidence gleaned from sites in China and Indonesia over the past two years now suggest that Asia played a bigger role than previously imagined -- possibly even giving rise to modern humans, who are generally thought to have originated in Africa.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | December 11, 2007
Human evolution is speeding up - and humans on different continents are becoming increasingly different, researchers say. The pace of evolutionary change has accelerated since humans wandered out of Africa thousands of years ago, with evidence in the way people in different parts of the world digest milk, make vitamin D from sunlight and fight off diseases such as HIV, according to researchers at the University of Utah. Scientists examined 3.9 million snippets of DNA from 270 people representing four different groups - Han Chinese, Japanese, Africa's Yoruba tribe and Northern Europeans - and found patterns showing evidence of recent natural selection in 1,800 genes.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 9, 2007
A 1.5 million-year-old skull and an equally old jaw found in Kenya are helping rewrite the history of early man, eliminating one reputed ancestor from the human lineage and suggesting that another was much more primitive than previously believed, researchers said yesterday. The jawbone shows that Homo habilis, previously believed to be a direct ancestor of Homo erectus and thus of humans, lived side by side with H. erectus, making them sister species rather than mother and daughter. "They co-existed at the same time and in the same place for half a million years," said anthropologist Fred Spoor of University College London, a co-author of the paper appearing in the journal Nature.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
Donna and Mike McDonough nearly demolished their kitchen searching for a slithery black snake that had accidentally made its way into their Perry Hall home. Mary Knauer, sick with a cold and running out of tissues, huddled in her pajamas and blew her nose on her sheets just to avoid the snakes she imagined lurked under her childhood bed. And Pam Goode didn't speak to her daughter Lauryn for weeks after the 17-year-old gave her a writhing 2-foot-long python as a gag gift one Hanukkah. No matter how rational we normally are, when you throw a slinky, slippery serpent into the equation, cue the shuddering and prepare for an instant reduction to raw emotion and knee-jerk reactions.
NEWS
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,CHICAGO TRIUBNE | September 9, 2005
CHICAGO - New research suggests that the human brain is still evolving, a process that may ultimately increase people's capacity to grow smarter. Two key brain-building genes, which underwent drastic changes in the past that coincided with huge leaps in human intellectual development, are still undergoing rapid mutations, evolution's way of selecting for new beneficial traits, Bruce Lahn and his colleagues at the University of Chicago reported in today's...
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
Researchers taking a second look at skull fragments in an Ethiopian museum have made a startling discovery: They're the oldest remains of modern human ever found. Tests on two partial skulls unearthed from wind-swept rock formations on opposite sides of Ethiopia's Omo River show that both are 195,000 years old - which pushes back the earliest known date for the emergence of modern humans by 35,000 years. In a report published today in the journal Nature, researchers say their new age estimates are based on dating techniques far more precise than those available when paleontologist Richard E. Leakey and colleagues unearthed the skulls in 1967.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
Add this to the reasons to take up jogging: It might be what separates us from the apes. Scientists at Harvard and the University of Utah say that much of our anatomy was shaped 2 million years ago when the earliest humans developed the bones, ligaments and joints necessary for long-distance running. That, in turn, gave humans a chance to hunt animals that were much faster in a sprint - but couldn't stay ahead in the long haul. Adaptations for running A close look at our skeletons - and the spring-like tendons in our legs and our relatively big buttocks (sorry, but it's true)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 2004
At a pivotal time in human evolution, about 2.4 million years ago, a muscle gene underwent a disabling alteration. And scientists say this could have made all the difference, leading to the enlarged brains of the lineage that evolved into modern humans. Researchers who made the discovery said this might be the first recognized functional genetic difference between humans and the apes that can be correlated with anatomical changes in the fossil record. As they said: The gene mutation might represent the beginning of the ancestral triumph of brain over brawn.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 16, 1995
Boston. -- I was a young reporter when I first started having the all-purpose generic nightmare suitable for anyone in the business of deadlines.The night before I was sent out of town on any assignment, I would dream that I was trying, desperately and unsuccessfully, to transmit my story back to the office in time.In one of those awful slow-mo sequences I would search for a telex machine in an unfamiliar town, try to track down a Western Union office where someone, somehow, would help me file my story.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 9, 2007
A 1.5 million-year-old skull and an equally old jaw found in Kenya are helping rewrite the history of early man, eliminating one reputed ancestor from the human lineage and suggesting that another was much more primitive than previously believed, researchers said yesterday. The jawbone shows that Homo habilis, previously believed to be a direct ancestor of Homo erectus and thus of humans, lived side by side with H. erectus, making them sister species rather than mother and daughter. "They co-existed at the same time and in the same place for half a million years," said anthropologist Fred Spoor of University College London, a co-author of the paper appearing in the journal Nature.
TOPIC
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
BEFORE precision-guided Tomahawk cruise missiles, before artillery, before swords and spears, probably even before the first caveman's bright idea of chipping flint into a sharp point, there was war. That is the conclusion of a growing number of anthropologists and biologists: that war is not a product of civilization -- of nations and economies and boundary lines -- but has somehow been hardwired into the brain, humanity's most potent weapon for good...
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 1997
Bigger, in evolutionary terms, may not be better.New research lends support to a recent scientific idea that modern humanity might be the product of an evolutionary decline - in body size.The reason, says John Kappelman, a University of Texas paleoanthropologist who was one of the first to raise the idea, might be that evolution has selected for cooperation and communication instead of brawn.The new research by scientists at the Johns Hopkins University and Kappelman's commentary on it appear in last week's issue of the British journal Nature.
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