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By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | July 15, 1995
Stupid Pet Tricks. Stupid Human Tricks. Nighttime talk-show host Dave Letterman has gotten a lot of laughs out of dogs that "sing" and people who juggle strange objects. But anyone who has ever done a rehab, a remodeling project, or even a major repair knows that houses can play tricks as well. Sometimes the things they do are so stupidly funny you wonder if inanimate objects have a sense of humor.Of course, some Stupid House Tricks are the result of previous human error -- by old-fashioned or unskilled carpenters, by amateur plumbers, or by over-enthusiastic let's-do-it-now-even-if-we-don't-have-th e-right-equipment-or-" knowledge do-it-yourselfers.
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NEWS
November 10, 2013
Baltimore wants to replace our water meters with smart meters at a cost of $83.5 million ( "City awards $83.5 million deal for water meters," Nov 7). I have lived in Baltimore County for 66 years and never had a faulty bill. Most of the reasons for this upgrade are cases of human error. True, "smart" meters will likely eliminate much of the human error - at a cost of many jobs. The track record of Itron speaks for itself. Just ask Houston, where they are still trying to resolve problems 10 years after Itron upgraded their system.
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By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
ELK NECK STATE PARK -- Coast Guard experts are looking at everything from river currents to radar systems to potential human error as they investigate Monday's fog-blanketed collision between a 20,000-pound cargo ship and a flotilla of tugs and barges -- an accident that left four crewmen missing. Reconstructing the crash scene will be an arduous task, involving dozens of interviews with surviving crewmen from the sunken tug Swift and with those who manned the A.V. Kastner freighter, Lt. Blake Welbourne, a Coast Guard investigations instructor, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Three Marine leaders have been relieved of their duties following the March training accident that killed a 21-year-old graduate of Severna Park High School and six other Marines, officials said Wednesday. Lance Cpl. William Taylor Wild IV of Severna Park and six other members of the 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment were killed March 18 when a 60mm mortar round exploded during a live-fire night attack at Hawthorne Army Depot in Nevada. Investigators have blamed the explosion on human error, said a 2nd Marine Division spokesman, 1st Lt. Peter Koerner.
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By Scott Wilson And Scott Higham and Scott Wilson And Scott Higham,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Marego Athans, Peter Hermann and Marcia Myers contributed to this article | February 19, 1996
Investigators searching through the twisted, charred remains of the Silver Spring train crash are focusing on signal switch problems or human error to explain why a MARC commuter train was traveling twice as fast as it should have been before the two trains collided.With half of the checks already completed on the signals, investigators say they are beginning to believe that a mistake by the MARC train operators may be to blame for the horrific accident."The facts are driving us toward the human," said John Goglia, a member of the National Transportation Safety Board who is leading the probe.
SPORTS
April 7, 1991
During their final ticket check, the Baltimore Orioles discovered last night a computer and/or human error that has made approximately 1,500 tickets available for Opening Day.Seats are available in most price categories.They will be on sale through TicketCenter PhoneCharge, (301) 481-6000 in the Baltimore area and (202) 432-0200 in the Washington area and starting at 10 a.m. today at the Memorial Stadium box office.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1999
Baltimore County police will begin enforcing a new law next month requiring homeowners to register their alarm systems -- and to pay fines for repeated false alarms, authorities said yesterday.Starting July 1, homeowners whose systems produce repeated false alarms face the possibility of fines that escalate from $50 to $1,000, county police said. Businesses have been covered by the law since December, leading to a decrease in false alarms and an increase in false-alarm calls that were canceled before police arrived.
NEWS
November 10, 2013
Baltimore wants to replace our water meters with smart meters at a cost of $83.5 million ( "City awards $83.5 million deal for water meters," Nov 7). I have lived in Baltimore County for 66 years and never had a faulty bill. Most of the reasons for this upgrade are cases of human error. True, "smart" meters will likely eliminate much of the human error - at a cost of many jobs. The track record of Itron speaks for itself. Just ask Houston, where they are still trying to resolve problems 10 years after Itron upgraded their system.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | April 10, 1991
An FBI forensic expert testified in Circuit Court on Monday that DNAfrom a man charged with murdering an Elkridge woman matches that found in bodily fluids taken from the victim's body.Special Agent Dwight Adams, head of the FBI's DNA analysis unit in Washington, testified that lab tests matched DNA in a blood sample from Vernon Clark with DNA in semen taken from the body of Kathleen Patricia Gouldin.DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the genetic blueprint for all life. Researchers believe each person's DNA is unique.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2003
Investigators were trying to determine yesterday why a Metro subway train was traveling on a closed track Sunday morning, leading to a collision with a maintenance truck that injured 11 people. Maryland Transit Administration officials said the truck was authorized to be doing repair work on the track near the State Center station downtown. They did not know why the subway train was running on that track when it was supposed to be using a parallel track that was not being repaired. MTA spokeswoman Suzanne Bond said she expects to be able to report on the cause of the crash by tomorrow.
SPORTS
June 12, 2012
Human error no crime Bob Foltman Chicago Tribune An investigation is warranted only to determine if the two judges that gave Timothy Bradley the fight were under improper outside influence. The fact that there was a good amount of money coming in late on Bradley at the Vegas sports books is enough to at least lift an eyebrow. But any investigation should be limited to that. I thought Pacquiao clearly won, but he could have made his life easier by knocking Bradley out, or at least knocking him down a few times.
NEWS
Liz F. Kay | October 11, 2011
The 161 patients of Dr. Mark G. Midei who are party to a malpractice suit against the cardiologist may have had their personal information compromised as a result of the security practices of a Baltimore law firm, reports Tricia Bishop. According to the story, an employee of Baxter, Baker, Sidle, Conn & Jones, which represents Midei, lost a hard drive with back-up information, which was "taken home nightly as a security precaution in case of fire or flood, a firm spokesman said, though the portable information was not encrypted -   among the most stringent security precautions that is standard practice for health professionals dealing with medical records.
SPORTS
April 20, 2011
To err is human Ira Winderman Sun Sentinel The NBA already routinely fines, suspends or issues sanctions against referees in such situations. It is why such offenders seemingly disappear from the postseason scene, as if shuffled off into witness protection. The real issue is whether the league should make such sanctions public, as is the case for players who receive fines or suspensions after flagrant or technical fouls. The difference here is human error — a mistake in judgment, not in the application of the rules.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
It's time for death penalty to receive an up or down vote in the Maryland General Assembly. I must strongly differ with Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller who this week declared there to be "no sentiment in the Senate" ("Death penalty repeal unlikely this year," March 16) for the 2011 repeal bill. The Senate bill has 21 co-sponsors this year (24 votes are required to pass), up from 16 two years ago. Meanwhile, the bill has 61 co-sponsors in the House. Illinois just repealed the death penalty.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Frustrated candidates and voters waited hours for results in this week's closest primaries, but elections officials insisted that delays and minor glitches were customary and that the state's voting system worked smoothly. While Marylanders may want electronic machines to spit out instantaneous numbers when polls close, elections officials say the reality of counting is more cumbersome, with room for error. The lag for results in Baltimore City and Baltimore County stemmed from missteps by poll workers and judges, as well as computer software glitches in some places.
NEWS
March 4, 2010
It sounds like a classic case of the tail wagging the dog. An inmate at a prison in Western Maryland files a piddling lawsuit on the Eastern Shore that requires his presence in court. When corrections officials attempt to transport him there so he can testify, he outwits them during a stopover in Baltimore and makes good his escape. This would be the stuff of a Hollywood movie -- or an urban legend -- except that it really happened. Raymond Taylor was serving three life terms at a maximum security facility in Cumberland for a triple shooting when he escaped from a downtown prison in Baltimore last Friday while en route to the Eastern Shore.
SPORTS
June 12, 2012
Human error no crime Bob Foltman Chicago Tribune An investigation is warranted only to determine if the two judges that gave Timothy Bradley the fight were under improper outside influence. The fact that there was a good amount of money coming in late on Bradley at the Vegas sports books is enough to at least lift an eyebrow. But any investigation should be limited to that. I thought Pacquiao clearly won, but he could have made his life easier by knocking Bradley out, or at least knocking him down a few times.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
It's time for death penalty to receive an up or down vote in the Maryland General Assembly. I must strongly differ with Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller who this week declared there to be "no sentiment in the Senate" ("Death penalty repeal unlikely this year," March 16) for the 2011 repeal bill. The Senate bill has 21 co-sponsors this year (24 votes are required to pass), up from 16 two years ago. Meanwhile, the bill has 61 co-sponsors in the House. Illinois just repealed the death penalty.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | October 26, 2007
Prosecutors have convicted suspects with fingerprints for more than a century - but the once unshakable certainty of fingerprint experts might be crumbling. When a Baltimore County judge barred fingerprint evidence in a murder case this week, her concerns echoed those of critics who say fingerprint identification remains as much art as science. "Basically, it's `trust me' forensic science, and that's scary," said Sandy L. Zabell, a Northwestern University mathematician who studies how statistics are used in court cases.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | September 21, 2006
Understand this: It is vital to keep all the issues surrounding the replay fiasco in Eugene, Ore., last weekend separate and in proper perspective. To put it so simply that a rabid, death-threat-sending Oklahoma fanatic might even understand: It's a game. Yes, it's a game worth millions of dollars, at least that many emotions and probably someone's job riding on the outcome, but still just a game. A good, credible game in which players and coaches make mistakes and, on balance, officials make a lot fewer mistakes.
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