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By SARA ENGRAM | May 23, 1993
Quarter after quarter, year after year, economists churn out the numbers. Gross National Product, currency movements, per capita income, trade balances -- these are the statistics that chart the progress of nations.But what of the progress of people? Where in all the charts and graphs do we learn what life is really like for people in Malawi or France or Mexico? What kind of life can a child born in those countries expect? What are the chances of getting an education and a job, or of enjoying the basic amenities of life?
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NEWS
By Mary Ann McCabe and Andrew L. Yarrow | August 4, 2009
Adolescence is a critical time - it is just that simple. In homes across America, parents are feeling pressure to hurry up and prepare teens to be independent. In popular culture, teenagers are characterized as being all about hormones and rebellion. In reality, "adolescence" is a widening span of life from about age 12 to the early to mid-20s. It encompasses both "youth" and "emerging adulthood" and involves some of the most complex biological, cognitive and social changes in human development - second, perhaps, only to early childhood development.
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NEWS
November 4, 1996
Louise Bates Ames,88, founder of the Gesell Institute of Human Development and a pioneer in child development studies, died Thursday of thyroid cancer in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her research showed that children go through "phases" of development and that the age of a child can be characterized by his or her temperament.At the Yale University Clinic of Child Development, Ames became a research assistant to Dr. Arnold Gesell and did thesis work on stages of crawling in infants.She founded the Gesell Institute of Human Development in 1950 with Dr. Frances Ilg and Dr. Janet Rodell.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | December 7, 2006
Incoming Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon yesterday named two City Hall officials and a veteran lawmaker to lead her interim administration next year - choices that she said underscore her commitment to carry on the priorities set by Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley. In perhaps the most significant announcement, Dixon named Otis Rolley III, currently the director of the city's Department of Planning, as chief of staff. Dixon also selected Andrew B. Frank, executive vice president of the Baltimore Development Corp.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1996
A militant anti-abortion group in Northeast Baltimore is trying to undermine a nationwide effort by the Roman Catholic Church to raise money for the poor.Rescue America, headed by anti-abortion activist Donald Treshman, contends that the church's annual Campaign for Human Development funds groups that support abortion rights, gay rights and other views that violate church teachings.Early this month, the Baltimore Archdiocese sent out "an urgent request for clarity" to its pastors, alerting them to an attack on the church charity by the group of conservative Catholics.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | May 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Women are the largest "excluded group" in the world, lagging behind men in earning power, political influence, literacy and recognition as contributors to the global economy, the United Nations says."
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | June 5, 1994
While economists quibble about the effects of ratcheting interests rates up or down, Mahbub ul Haq is drawing the world's attention to real-life economics. Mr. Haq, Pakistan's former finance minister, is the guiding light behind the United Nations' Human Development Report, a survey that looks behind the numbers to see how economic forces play out in the lives of people around the world.The fifth annual report was released this past week, and the news is mixed.On the bright side, more people than ever live under relatively pluralistic and democratic governments.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | June 25, 1993
Washington. -- Ask an American which of the world's countries offers the highest quality of living, and you're likely to be told, ''The good old U.S.A.'' That's a reasonable, if predictable reply. On the whole, life is good here.But put the same query to a neutral party that has access to worldwide social and economic data -- someone, say, like the United Nations -- and you get a surprisingly different response.The United States ranks only sixth in the latest Human Development Index published by the U.N. Development Program behind Japan, Canada, Norway, Switzerland and Sweden.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater | July 28, 1991
Beginning this fall, Goucher College will offer a master's degree program that trains teachers to help children whose environment outside of school increases their risk of academic failure.Working closely with the Sheppard Pratt National Center for Human Development, the college has developed plans for an education curriculum that focuses on three groups of children: the "urban child," the middle school child and the "at-risk" child.Educators need specialized knowledge to help these children overcome the psychological and sociological pressures they face and achieve academic success, says Eli Velder, professor of education at Goucher College and director of the master of education program.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 17, 2004
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - For years now, it's been clear that the Middle East peace process has left the realm of diplomacy and started to become an industry, with its own GNP of conferences and seminars. But there is a new industry rapidly overtaking it in the Middle East, and that is the "reform industry." Every month there seems to be a new conference on reform in the Arab world. Indeed, I have been attending one here in Dubai. What the reform process and the peace process have in common is that neither advances when we Americans tell the parties in English that they have to change.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 17, 2004
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - For years now, it's been clear that the Middle East peace process has left the realm of diplomacy and started to become an industry, with its own GNP of conferences and seminars. But there is a new industry rapidly overtaking it in the Middle East, and that is the "reform industry." Every month there seems to be a new conference on reform in the Arab world. Indeed, I have been attending one here in Dubai. What the reform process and the peace process have in common is that neither advances when we Americans tell the parties in English that they have to change.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | October 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - I should have known something was up when a Saudi diplomat recently asked me, "Do you know what kind of woman is most sought after as a wife by Saudi men today?" No, I said, what kind? "A woman with a job." I thought of that when I read last week's announcement that within a year Saudi Arabia will conduct its first real elections - for municipal councils. Most people thought it would snow in Saudi Arabia before there would be elections. So what's up? What's up are three big shocks hammering the Arab system.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | July 4, 2002
WASHINGTON -- President Bush was right to declare that the Palestinians need to produce decent governance before they can get a state. Too bad, though, that he didn't say that it's not only the Palestinians who need radical reform of their governance -- it's most of the Arab world. By coincidence, though, some other important folks had the courage to say that just this week: The U.N. Development Program, which on Tuesday published, along with the Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development, a brutally honest Arab Human Development Report, analyzing the three main reasons the Arab world is falling off the globe.
NEWS
By Curt Civin and Samuel Rosenberg | April 5, 2002
FEDERAL legislation is not always best for regulating controversial issues. Where no national consensus exists and the debate is polarized, we should follow Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis' suggestion that states be allowed to act as "laboratories of democracy." Regulation of stem cell and cloning research should be conducted this way. Most scientists, and most Americans, are uncomfortable with the risks that might accompany "reproductive cloning" of humans. Yet support for "therapeutic cloning" research is widespread -- though not unanimous -- because of its potential to develop technologies that might someday provide new organs or tissues for patients with debilitating or fatal conditions.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 2001
An Ethiopian fossil hunter has found the bones and teeth of forest-dwelling creatures that lived up to 5.8 million years ago, a discovery that appears to challenge some assumptions of early human evolution and extend knowledge of the family tree back close to its roots. The fossils are the remains of creatures that apparently walked upright. They are more than 1 million years older than any other fossils definitively established as those of hominids, the group of species that includes humans, their direct ancestors and close relatives.
NEWS
June 3, 1999
Western Maryland College is accepting students for the third cohort of its graduate program in human resources development.The two-year course of study leading to a master's degree in HRD is expected to begin in mid-September. The program features six-week courses throughout the year meeting twice a week on Wednesday evenings and Saturday mornings. The program does include short breaks for Christmas and spring, as well as an extended break in late summer.Although the cohort model is designed so that students go through the entire program together, students can transfer eligible credits in order to graduate in less than two years, according to Sherri Lind Hughes, HRD coordinator and associate professor of psychology.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | October 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - I should have known something was up when a Saudi diplomat recently asked me, "Do you know what kind of woman is most sought after as a wife by Saudi men today?" No, I said, what kind? "A woman with a job." I thought of that when I read last week's announcement that within a year Saudi Arabia will conduct its first real elections - for municipal councils. Most people thought it would snow in Saudi Arabia before there would be elections. So what's up? What's up are three big shocks hammering the Arab system.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | July 19, 1996
TOKYO -- Eighty-nine countries are worse off economically than they were 10 years ago. Since there are only 160 countries with usable data bases, this statistic contained in the Human Development Report published here this week by the U.N. Development Program is startling -- and damning, for it could have been largely avoided.In part this predicament was the fall-out from the 1973 and 1979 oil-price hikes. In part it was aggravated by the recession of the 1980s that struck most of the industrialized countries and radiated to their Third World trading partners.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1998
Fifteen nursing aides from low-income communities are checking the vital signs of and giving bed baths to elderly and disabled Baltimore-area residents as part of a new agency, Baltimore Care Givers.The agency Monday won a $50,000 award, the largest of nine grants totaling $184,500 given to eight "self-help" Baltimore groups by the Catholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD). The campaign, a national program founded by U.S. Catholic bishops, is in its 28th year here."We'll soon have 30 to 40 people trained to provide a variety of services under contract in homes, nursing homes, assisted-living facilities, adult day care homes and other places," said Warren Nilsson, director of Baltimore Care Givers, an offshoot of Southeast Development Inc., which is part of the Southeast Community Organization (SECO)
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1997
New Southwest Community Association has received a $40,000 grant from the Campaign for Human Development to organize more residents in its 2-year-old drive for improved local schools.The group will fix up a multipurpose community center and office in the 300 block of S. Gilmor St., hire a director/community organizer to stimulate interest in its School Sense project and hold community organizing meetings."There is so much talent here, there is deterioration of education here and this is about hope to make things better," said Ann Ames, association president.
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