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Human Condition

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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art critic | July 16, 1993
Art ReviewWhat: Works of Mark D. Clark and James von MinorWhere: Nye Gomez Gallery, 836 Leadenhall St.When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, through Aug. 7Call: (410) 752-2080Mark D. Clark's art combines elements of photography, sculpture and painting to make human images that can have an extraordinary presence.Clark photographs the human figure, then applies the photograph to a wooden backing (about an inch thick), which has often been cut out to fit the outlines of the figure photographed.
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NEWS
May 25, 2012
The greatest commencement address ever is now more than three decades old. And it's safe to say it will never be surpassed or even equaled. It belongs to the ages. In 1979, its author summed up the condition of modern man by noting that, quote, more than at any other time in history, humanity is at the crossroads: One path leads to despair and utter hopelessness; the other, to total extinction. Let us pray we have the wisdom to choose correctly. Unquote. Bang. That's all she wrote.
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By Patrice M. Jones and Patrice M. Jones,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 12, 2005
Steven Levitt looks the part of the University of Chicago's next rising-star economist as he weaves his way down Michigan Avenue, his tie flapping in the wind, his cell phone humming. His dark suit says Wall Street, but after several days of too many airports and too many public appearances, his youthful eyes resemble those of a boy who needs a nap Levitt has been crisscrossing the nation promoting his new book, Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything, which delves into the decidedly unconventional economic turf of human frailties such as cheating, corruption and crime.
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Ideas Editor | April 15, 2007
Kurt Vonnegut, the gentle humanist who challenged Americans to be true to themselves and mistrust technology, wealth and the arrogance of power, died last week, possibly with a bemused appreciation of the fact that all of the ugliest aspects of popular culture he challenged for more than half a century appeared to be thriving. The author of 19 novels and an array of plays and short stories, he struggled to make a living as a writer of science fiction until the success in 1969 of Slaughterhouse-Five, a fictional treatment of his survival as a prisoner of war during the tragic and senseless Allied bombing of Dresden late in World War II. An estimated 135,000 people died in the Dresden firestorm.
NEWS
By Seamus Heaney | June 16, 2003
The following are excerpts from a commencement address delivered by the Nobel laureate poet at Emory University in Atlanta on May 12. Acts of coldly premeditated terror such as those of Sept. 11, carefully premeditated acts of war such as the campaign in Iraq - these things have had a quality of mirage about them. We experienced them partly as the undeniable facts of day-to-day life, but partly also as some kind of ominous foreboding, as if we were walking in step with ourselves in an immense theater of dreams.
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Ideas Editor | April 15, 2007
Kurt Vonnegut, the gentle humanist who challenged Americans to be true to themselves and mistrust technology, wealth and the arrogance of power, died last week, possibly with a bemused appreciation of the fact that all of the ugliest aspects of popular culture he challenged for more than half a century appeared to be thriving. The author of 19 novels and an array of plays and short stories, he struggled to make a living as a writer of science fiction until the success in 1969 of Slaughterhouse-Five, a fictional treatment of his survival as a prisoner of war during the tragic and senseless Allied bombing of Dresden late in World War II. An estimated 135,000 people died in the Dresden firestorm.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 16, 1995
Boston. -- I was a young reporter when I first started having the all-purpose generic nightmare suitable for anyone in the business of deadlines.The night before I was sent out of town on any assignment, I would dream that I was trying, desperately and unsuccessfully, to transmit my story back to the office in time.In one of those awful slow-mo sequences I would search for a telex machine in an unfamiliar town, try to track down a Western Union office where someone, somehow, would help me file my story.
NEWS
May 25, 2012
The greatest commencement address ever is now more than three decades old. And it's safe to say it will never be surpassed or even equaled. It belongs to the ages. In 1979, its author summed up the condition of modern man by noting that, quote, more than at any other time in history, humanity is at the crossroads: One path leads to despair and utter hopelessness; the other, to total extinction. Let us pray we have the wisdom to choose correctly. Unquote. Bang. That's all she wrote.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | April 7, 1994
AT THE conclusion of the incomparable "Angels in America," a dying man named Prior Walter has the last word. Prior has seen ghosts and angels, love and betrayal, lesions blooming on his body and the deaths of many friends.But in the end, as he speaks of AIDS, America and the human condition, some of the things that this monumental play is about, he has a kind of peace so profound that you must genuflect before its grandeur, greater than any seraphim."This disease will be the end of many of us," he says, "but not nearly all, and the dead will be commemorated and will struggle on with the living, and we are not going away.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 8, 1991
If there is such a thing as a conventional nude, Connie Imboden's black and white photographs -- of nudes shown either in water or through the medium of a scratched mirror -- are far from it.At Knight Gomez this month more than 40 of her works are on view, and such a concentration reveals especially well their exploration of aspects of the human condition. It's tempting to say they're psychological, and indeed some of them are, but others deal with relationships, and still others are about what could be called character traits.
TOPIC
By Patrice M. Jones and Patrice M. Jones,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 12, 2005
Steven Levitt looks the part of the University of Chicago's next rising-star economist as he weaves his way down Michigan Avenue, his tie flapping in the wind, his cell phone humming. His dark suit says Wall Street, but after several days of too many airports and too many public appearances, his youthful eyes resemble those of a boy who needs a nap Levitt has been crisscrossing the nation promoting his new book, Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything, which delves into the decidedly unconventional economic turf of human frailties such as cheating, corruption and crime.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 7, 2005
Since the 1970s, critics have had to make a distinction between "photographers who are artists" and "artists who use photography." The difference has to do with the way artists who work with camera images regard the history and conventions of art photography. I think of "photographers who are artists" as people skilled in the traditional techniques and methods of the medium. A list of their names would include the usual suspects in any discussion of "great photographers" - Eugene Atget and Andre Kertesz, Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Richard Avedon, to name just a few. In the other category are people who think of themselves as artists in terms of the traditional fine arts media such as painting and sculpture, yet also incorporate camera imagery into their work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
With new streetside cameras staring down at passing traffic and pedestrians, and digital cameras snapping instant pictures of the kids at Christmas, the role of the lens and the person looking through it is changing. This shift in technology has led artists to experiment with photography under these new circumstances, questioning the nature of the observer and, on a broader scale, what it means to be human. In a new exhibition at Maryland Art Place called Human Conditions, 12 emerging and veteran artists from across the country examine these issues.
NEWS
By Seamus Heaney | June 16, 2003
The following are excerpts from a commencement address delivered by the Nobel laureate poet at Emory University in Atlanta on May 12. Acts of coldly premeditated terror such as those of Sept. 11, carefully premeditated acts of war such as the campaign in Iraq - these things have had a quality of mirage about them. We experienced them partly as the undeniable facts of day-to-day life, but partly also as some kind of ominous foreboding, as if we were walking in step with ourselves in an immense theater of dreams.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 7, 2002
The Spanish painter Francisco Goya y Lucientes (1746-1828) refuses to be put into any neat intellectual box because his art transcends any single idea. Whether his nominal subject is women or bullfighting or the horror of war, his art always speaks to the whole of the human condition and that is why it moves us. So I may as well say at the outset that my initial reaction to Goya: Images of Women, the beautiful exhibition at Washington's National Gallery of Art, was tempered by skepticism at what at first seemed to be another attempt to make the art of the past more accessible by tying it to contemporary fashion -- in this case the great interest in feminist re-examinations of art history.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1999
So who was the genius who picked the National Aquarium's Marine Mammal Pavilion for a lecture Sunday morning by Jane Goodall?The celebrated environmental campaigner and chronicler of the lives of wild chimpanzees hates the idea of captive performing dolphins.She has dedicated her life to confronting the economic forces and the ignorance that denude the forests surrounding her beloved Gombe Wildlife Preserve in Tanzania and that encourage pet traders, zoos and medical labs to mistreat wild and captive animals.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | December 30, 1994
What is enticing William Richardson away from the top spot at the Johns Hopkins University?That's easy, according to Russell G. Mawby. "He's gotten himself the best job in the world."Dr. Mawby should know. He's the man Dr. Richardson will succeed as president and chief executive officer of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the wealthy philanthropy created by the cereal magnate.The difference between Dr. Richardson's current job and his new one is as vast as the distinction between giving and receiving.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | April 12, 1998
Attending a film festival may smack of a busman's holiday for a film critic, but that's just how I spent my spring vacation. For 10 days recently, I gorged myself on films, music, Tex-Mex and barbecue at the South by Southwest film and music festival in Austin, Texas.The fortnight was exhausting, fattening and thoroughly exhilarating. There's nothing like marathon movies -- in the company of fellow enthusiasts -- to remind a critic that film can still be the most absorbing, electric and transforming of artistic mediums.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1997
You may know her as the stoic-looking woman who stood on the podium with President Clinton during his first inauguration. She read a poem, a "love song" for the nation called "On the Pulse of Morning."You may know her as the warm and wise mentor to the nation's No. 1 talk show diva -- that would be Oprah Winfrey -- from whom she appears to have a standing invitation to come on TV and dispense pearls of wisdom.You may even know her as the black woman who stood steadfast before a sea of black men at the 1995 Million Man March, where she poetically praised the crowd, then prodded them to seek excellence for themselves, their families, their communities and the country.
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