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Human Cloning

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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A panel of experts has concluded that President Clinton should ban human cloning -- for now -- but suggested that it might be allowed in the future if society's values change.The committee's scientists, religious scholars and bioethicists based their recommendation on the fact that the technology for safe human cloning has not been developed, according to a draft of a report due Saturday.Cloning's "effects on the moral, religious, and cultural values of society may be enough to justify prohibitions in the future, but more time is needed for discussion of these concerns," the draft says.
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NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - Advocates of more government spending for embryonic stem-cell research said yesterday's turnabout by Senate Republican Leader Bill Frist has the potential to change the outcome in Congress and, they hope, influence President Bush to change his mind, too. In a speech on the Senate floor, Frist said he would now support legislation, passed by the House in May, to allow more federal funding for research using embryos that would otherwise be...
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 1997
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Trying to tread a fine line between encouraging scientific progress and preventing horrendous abuses of a new technology, a presidential advisory committee agreed yesterday that there should be a moratorium on the cloning of human beings by public or private institutions.The group said efforts to clone a person would not be safe now because they would be too likely to result in malformed fetuses.The 18-member group was charged by President Clinton with making a recommendation on human cloning by the end of the month.
NEWS
February 8, 2005
Bill seeks $25 million annually in stem-cell research funding Immersing the state into the debate over embryonic stem-cell research, Sen. Paula C. Hollinger and Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg announced yesterday the introduction of a bill that would spend $25 million in state money annually on the research. The Democratic lawmakers were surrounded by a diverse coalition of supporters, including religious figures, researchers, a 12-year-old suffering from juvenile diabetes and a 50-year-old father with Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 17, 1998
BOSTON -- To be frank, I've had a little trouble taking the business of human clone-making seriously. Consider the most celebrated would-be clone-maker: Richard Seed. Would you take your infertility problems to someone named Dr. Seed?When the Chicago physicist announced he was going to begin cloning people, the business motto alone went over the top: "Identical Twins -- 30 Years Apart!"The 69-year-old who confessed that he is "only a near-genius" predicted cheerily that "clones are going to be fun. I can't wait to make two or three of my own self."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Stepping into an uncharted intersection of science and morality, President Clinton banned the use of federal funds for human cloning research yesterday and called upon private-sector scientists to voluntarily refrain from such experiments.Responding to last week's report that a Scottish scientist had cloned a sheep -- and more recent news of the cloning of two monkeys in Oregon -- Clinton cautioned that the emerging science is creating new ethical burdens for humanity even as it holds great promise for agriculture, medicine and other areas of commerce.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1997
The Scottish scientist who surprised the world by successfully cloning a sheep said yesterday that he would support at least a temporary moratorium on experiments involving human cells.In Baltimore for a conference on biotechnology and animal health, Dr. Ian Wilmut said he could see no moral justification for producing identical people but felt the underlying technology could be used to reprogram human cells to reverse disease.This, said Wilmut, might be the most important application to emerge from the technology that made Dolly, a white lamb cloned from the udder cell of a ewe. But he said such uses were many years off, and scientists could use a cooling-off period to work on applications such as the production of farm animals whose milk could be taken as pharmaceuticals.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1998
When Chicago physicist Richard Seed announced his plan to open the world's first human cloning clinic, President Clinton quickly denounced the idea as "untested and unsafe, and morally unacceptable."Federal funding for cloning research already is banned. Now Clinton wants Congress to pass a five-year unilateral ban on human cloning while we study its social and ethical implications.House Majority Leader Dick Armey wants more: a total, permanent ban. "This is the right thing to do, at the right time, for the sake of human dignity," the Texas Republican said.
NEWS
By Cardinal William H. Keeler | February 24, 2004
PEOPLE IN OUR time are understandably dazzled by advances in science and technology. But this makes it all the more important to step back at times and ask whether the latest "advance" isn't really a step backward for humanity. The news that South Korean scientists have cloned human embryos, and created a stem cell line from one of them, has revived exaggerated hopes about human cloning as a "therapeutic" technique. A dose of realism is in order. Research in mouse embryonic stem cells is a quarter of a century old and has not produced safe and effective treatments for major illnesses in mice.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 18, 1998
Successful cloning of humans is inevitable and will happen soon despite ethical objections to it, American scientists said yesterday after learning of reports by South Korean fertility doctors that they had taken a major step toward cloning a human being.The Korean team did not make a baby -- just a microscopic, four-cell embryo that it later destroyed.And it did not have genetic proof that this embryo was really a clone of the young woman whose cells the team used and could thus have developed into her identical twin.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - The United Nations is expected to consider today whether to embrace a proposal backed by the Bush White House for a global ban on human cloning, including therapeutic cloning of embryos for research aimed at curing a range of diseases and conditions. All 191 U.N. member nations agree on a treaty to ban cloning to create human beings, or what is called reproductive cloning. But the world body has been as divided as the U.S. Congress - and, in fact, as the president's own Council on Bioethics - on the question of cloning embryos to create stem cells for scientific research.
NEWS
By Cardinal William H. Keeler | February 24, 2004
PEOPLE IN OUR time are understandably dazzled by advances in science and technology. But this makes it all the more important to step back at times and ask whether the latest "advance" isn't really a step backward for humanity. The news that South Korean scientists have cloned human embryos, and created a stem cell line from one of them, has revived exaggerated hopes about human cloning as a "therapeutic" technique. A dose of realism is in order. Research in mouse embryonic stem cells is a quarter of a century old and has not produced safe and effective treatments for major illnesses in mice.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2004
Five years after his big breakthrough in stem cell research, the pressure is on John D. Gearhart to do it again. It increased this month when South Korean scientists told the world they had cloned a human embryo to harvest its stem cells - prompting Gearhart's telephone to ring incessantly with calls for his expert opinion. So it was that the 60-year-old coal miner's son sandwiched dozens of interviews with journalists between meetings in his Johns Hopkins University stem-cell laboratory and a trip to Capitol Hill to plead for broader stem cell research funding.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 2003
Milk and meat from cloned animals are safe to eat, the Food and Drug Administration has tentatively concluded, a finding that could eventually clear the way for such products to reach supermarket shelves and for cloning to be widely used to breed livestock. The agency's conclusions are being released today in advance of a public meeting on the issue Tuesday in Rockville. Agency officials said that after receiving public comments, they hope to outline by late spring their views on how, if at all, cloning would be regulated, including whether food from cloned animals should be labeled.
NEWS
By Robyn Suriano and Robyn Suriano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2003
All human cloning would be banned under a bill introduced yesterday in Congress, touching off a new debate over whether to halt potentially promising research into treatments for many diseases. The bill - sponsored in part by U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon, a Florida Republican - would send people to jail and levy fines of up to $1 million for human cloning endeavors, whether the intent is to make a baby or to use the cloned embryos for research. The total ban is expected to pass the U.S. House but stall in the Senate, where lawmakers oppose the technique for reproduction but remain divided over whether it could be used for research.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 6, 2003
BOSTON - All in all it's probably not the best PR move for an atheist cult to dub its first offspring Eve. It might look as if they think they're God. Besides, the biblical, or even the Darwinian Eve, was the mother of us all. The girl whose birth was trumpeted as the first-ever clone would be the daughter and identical twin of one of us. Still, the Raelian believers and scientists get credit for their 15 minutes of fame and their half-hour on CNN....
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 15, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- If, as many people predict, human cloning is looming in our future, then who should and who shouldn't be allowed to be cloned?University of Pennsylvania ethicist Glenn McGee is proposing a system that would, in essence, bar anyone who wants to make a copy of himself or herself."
FEATURES
By Steve Rhodes and Steve Rhodes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 1998
Chicago -- Richard Seed is a busy man these days. Busy hatching plans. Out on the lecture circuit. Developing grand theories. Thinking.Or so he would have you believe.More likely, he is spending a lot of time at his home in Riverside, west of Chicago. He apparently has no job, and he isn't making any money from his much-discussed cloning lab. There is no cloning lab. Just the occasional call from a reporter wanting to know how it's going.But Seed will not be cloning anyone. The wild ride he's been on since December is over.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2002
It's either a spectacular hoax or scientific landmark. But a religious sect that believes humans descended from aliens claimed yesterday that it had created the world's first human clone, a baby called Eve who is a genetic carbon copy of her mother. "The baby is very healthy. The parents are happy," said Brigitte Boisselier, a former university chemist who directs Clonaid, a company founded by the Raelians to create human clones. Though offering no evidence to back up her claim, Boisselier said the baby was born by Caesarean section at 11:55 a.m. Thursday and weighed 7 pounds.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2002
A prominent scientific panel urged a nationwide ban yesterday on the cloning of human beings but supported "therapeutic cloning" to produce stem cells for treatment of life-threatening diseases. The panel, convened by the National Academy of Sciences, joined the debate as the ethically charged issue came before a presidential bioethics council and simmered on Capitol Hill. In the six years since the birth of Dolly the sheep, the first cloned mammal, experiments that have produced cloned pigs, goats and cows have shown the procedure to be dangerous to both mother and offspring, the panel said.
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