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NEWS
May 3, 2005
KUDOS TO the National Academy of Sciences for ably filling the breach caused by the absence of federal guidelines on human embryonic stem cell research. While we prefer that rules governing research on human tissues be federal and enforceable, the National Academy of Sciences' new voluntary guidelines are a necessary stand-in. The administration's ban on federal funding for new-line embryonic stem cell research has not slowed its growth. States -- most notably California, through a $3 billion 10-year initiative -- have taken on the role of funder for this breakthrough, not-ready-for-profit science.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance and Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance,Sun reporters | November 21, 2007
Scientists in the U.S. and Japan have converted human skin cells into stem cells like the ones found in embryos, a breakthrough that could yield regenerative therapies without igniting the ethical debates that have embroiled the field for nearly a decade. Yesterday's announcements raise the possibility that cells taken from sick patients could be reprogrammed and used to repair tissues damaged by heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses. The technique, achieved earlier this year in mice, holds two potential advantages.
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BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
Celera Genomics Group announced yesterday that it would collaborate with Menlo Park, Calif.-based Geron Corp. to identify genes at work in stem cells - the cells from which all other cells in the body develop. Once those genes and their functions are identified, Geron will be free to develop drugs and diagnostic tests based on them. And Rockville-based Celera will put the information in databases it sells to pharmaceutical companies and scientists researching cures for disease, giving them information about which genes are involved in human development and what they do. Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed, but Celera Chief Medical Officer Samuel Broder said the company stands to get a cut of the profits from any treatment designed using knowledge generated from the collaboration.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Harvard University researchers announced an ambitious, privately funded plan yesterday to create human stem cell lines from cloned embryos, an ethically charged endeavor that could yield treatments for diabetes, sickle-cell anemia and other disorders. The scientists said the stem cell lines, created in part from DNA taken from sick patients, would also enable them to observe how diseases develop at the earliest stages of human life - long before symptoms are evident. "We hope to move the study from patients to the petri dish," said Dr. Douglas Melton, whose research shifted to Type-1 diabetes several years ago when both of his children were diagnosed with the disease.
NEWS
By Robert Cooke and Robert Cooke,Newsday | June 21, 1991
For the first time, living cells from humans have been transplanted successfully into mice, scientists reported yesterday, suggesting that it may become possible to do the opposite, using animal organs to cure human diseases.By treating the human cells, "masking" them from the mouse's immune system, Dr. Denise Faustman said, she and colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston were able to implant the cells without rejection and without using drugs to suppress the rodents' normal immunity.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance and Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance,Sun reporters | November 21, 2007
Scientists in the U.S. and Japan have converted human skin cells into stem cells like the ones found in embryos, a breakthrough that could yield regenerative therapies without igniting the ethical debates that have embroiled the field for nearly a decade. Yesterday's announcements raise the possibility that cells taken from sick patients could be reprogrammed and used to repair tissues damaged by heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses. The technique, achieved earlier this year in mice, holds two potential advantages.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 1, 1997
In a major milestone in the study of human heredity, researchers announced yesterday that they have created the first working, artificial human chromosome, which experts said represents a quantum leap in the ability to probe the complex molecules that make up humankind.The new technology offers scientists a powerful new research tool for investigating fundamental questions about the chemistry responsible for human heredity, experts said.Its inventors at Case Western Reserve University and Athersys Inc. hope the techniques also may offer a way to cure inherited diseases by altering a cell's genetic structure -- bypassing biochemical stumbling blocks that have so far stymied efforts to accomplish that task.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Harvard University researchers announced an ambitious, privately funded plan yesterday to create human stem cell lines from cloned embryos, an ethically charged endeavor that could yield treatments for diabetes, sickle-cell anemia and other disorders. The scientists said the stem cell lines, created in part from DNA taken from sick patients, would also enable them to observe how diseases develop at the earliest stages of human life - long before symptoms are evident. "We hope to move the study from patients to the petri dish," said Dr. Douglas Melton, whose research shifted to Type-1 diabetes several years ago when both of his children were diagnosed with the disease.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1998
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the University of Wisconsin said yesterday that they had separately reached a potential milestone toward growing human tissue for transplantation.The researchers, reporting in two journals, said they had used different methods to grow colonies of embryonic stem cells -- parent cells for every tissue in the human body. Both teams acknowledged that the work, although exciting, is likely to ignite a debate over the source of the cells: aborted fetuses in Baltimore and unused embryos in Wisconsin.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2001
SPRINGFIELD, Va. - On their long journey home from the World Trade Center, some of the dead pass through an unusual way station: Mark Radcliff's freezer. Radcliff is an evidence custodian at Bode Technology Group, one of three private laboratories hired by New York City to help identify its dead. His job: making sure chunks of bone, tufts of hair and vials of victim DNA chilling behind locked doors find their way to scientists trying to attach names to them. Seemingly forgotten amid worries of anthrax and Afghanistan are the many forensic scientists quietly plugging away on the largest DNA identification effort in history.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and By Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
It seems like science fiction: Researchers seeking cures for disease put human cells into the brains of living monkeys, only to worry the animals might become more like people. But the experiments are real and, according to a paper in the journal Science, the remote possibility of subtle humanlike effects can't be ruled out, even though none has been reported. As a result, say the scientists, philosophers and bioethicists who wrote the paper, researchers implant-ing human neural stem cells into the brains of primates should follow guidelines designed to discourage the development of monkeys and apes that think or feel more like us. No one is suggesting that experiments in adult monkeys, such as early tests of treatments for Parkinson's and other diseases, will result in "humanzees" akin to those featured in Robin Cook's novel Chromosome 6. There, monkey-human blends created to produce organs for transplants ended up talking and carrying stone tools.
NEWS
May 3, 2005
KUDOS TO the National Academy of Sciences for ably filling the breach caused by the absence of federal guidelines on human embryonic stem cell research. While we prefer that rules governing research on human tissues be federal and enforceable, the National Academy of Sciences' new voluntary guidelines are a necessary stand-in. The administration's ban on federal funding for new-line embryonic stem cell research has not slowed its growth. States -- most notably California, through a $3 billion 10-year initiative -- have taken on the role of funder for this breakthrough, not-ready-for-profit science.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2004
When a pair of scientists announced that they had isolated the first human embryonic stem cells, some researchers predicted that an experimental treatment for Parkinson's disease would be available in five to 10 years. That was five years ago; no human trials are in sight. A short while later, a neurologist at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine told patients experiencing the first twinges of Lou Gehrig's disease that he might offer them an experimental stem-cell therapy before the illness paralyzed and killed them.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2001
SPRINGFIELD, Va. - On their long journey home from the World Trade Center, some of the dead pass through an unusual way station: Mark Radcliff's freezer. Radcliff is an evidence custodian at Bode Technology Group, one of three private laboratories hired by New York City to help identify its dead. His job: making sure chunks of bone, tufts of hair and vials of victim DNA chilling behind locked doors find their way to scientists trying to attach names to them. Seemingly forgotten amid worries of anthrax and Afghanistan are the many forensic scientists quietly plugging away on the largest DNA identification effort in history.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
Celera Genomics Group announced yesterday that it would collaborate with Menlo Park, Calif.-based Geron Corp. to identify genes at work in stem cells - the cells from which all other cells in the body develop. Once those genes and their functions are identified, Geron will be free to develop drugs and diagnostic tests based on them. And Rockville-based Celera will put the information in databases it sells to pharmaceutical companies and scientists researching cures for disease, giving them information about which genes are involved in human development and what they do. Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed, but Celera Chief Medical Officer Samuel Broder said the company stands to get a cut of the profits from any treatment designed using knowledge generated from the collaboration.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1998
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the University of Wisconsin said yesterday that they had separately reached a potential milestone toward growing human tissue for transplantation.The researchers, reporting in two journals, said they had used different methods to grow colonies of embryonic stem cells -- parent cells for every tissue in the human body. Both teams acknowledged that the work, although exciting, is likely to ignite a debate over the source of the cells: aborted fetuses in Baltimore and unused embryos in Wisconsin.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and By Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
It seems like science fiction: Researchers seeking cures for disease put human cells into the brains of living monkeys, only to worry the animals might become more like people. But the experiments are real and, according to a paper in the journal Science, the remote possibility of subtle humanlike effects can't be ruled out, even though none has been reported. As a result, say the scientists, philosophers and bioethicists who wrote the paper, researchers implant-ing human neural stem cells into the brains of primates should follow guidelines designed to discourage the development of monkeys and apes that think or feel more like us. No one is suggesting that experiments in adult monkeys, such as early tests of treatments for Parkinson's and other diseases, will result in "humanzees" akin to those featured in Robin Cook's novel Chromosome 6. There, monkey-human blends created to produce organs for transplants ended up talking and carrying stone tools.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2004
When a pair of scientists announced that they had isolated the first human embryonic stem cells, some researchers predicted that an experimental treatment for Parkinson's disease would be available in five to 10 years. That was five years ago; no human trials are in sight. A short while later, a neurologist at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine told patients experiencing the first twinges of Lou Gehrig's disease that he might offer them an experimental stem-cell therapy before the illness paralyzed and killed them.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 1, 1997
In a major milestone in the study of human heredity, researchers announced yesterday that they have created the first working, artificial human chromosome, which experts said represents a quantum leap in the ability to probe the complex molecules that make up humankind.The new technology offers scientists a powerful new research tool for investigating fundamental questions about the chemistry responsible for human heredity, experts said.Its inventors at Case Western Reserve University and Athersys Inc. hope the techniques also may offer a way to cure inherited diseases by altering a cell's genetic structure -- bypassing biochemical stumbling blocks that have so far stymied efforts to accomplish that task.
NEWS
By Robert Cooke and Robert Cooke,Newsday | June 21, 1991
For the first time, living cells from humans have been transplanted successfully into mice, scientists reported yesterday, suggesting that it may become possible to do the opposite, using animal organs to cure human diseases.By treating the human cells, "masking" them from the mouse's immune system, Dr. Denise Faustman said, she and colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston were able to implant the cells without rejection and without using drugs to suppress the rodents' normal immunity.
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