Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHuman Capital
IN THE NEWS

Human Capital

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Erica E. Gum | November 25, 1991
HUMAN CAPITAL AND AMERICA'S FUTURE: AN ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR THE '90s. Edited by David W. Hornbeck and Lester M. Salamon. Johns Hopkins University Press. 402 pages. Paper, $16.95. Hard cover, $45.What should the United Sates do to become more competitive? It needs to make greater investments in human capital: the skills, abilities and knowledge possessed by its workforce. So say the authors of "Human Capital and America's Future."Lester A. Salamon, director of the Johns Hopkins University Institute for Policy Studies, believes that "human capital investment must become the centerpiece of our economic strategy for the years ahead."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | April 22, 2014
Incoming Baltimore schools superintendent Gregory Thornton is already shaking up the ranks at city school headquarters, naming three key Cabinet heads who will start with him on July 1. The city school board approved in a special meeting Tuesday the appointment of new chiefs of staff, academics and human capital. Thornton's current chief of staff, Naomi Gubernick, will come with him to Baltimore. In Milwaukee, Gubernick is known as the woman who runs the nuts and bolts of the system from behind the scenes.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | April 22, 2014
Incoming Baltimore schools superintendent Gregory Thornton is already shaking up the ranks at city school headquarters, naming three key Cabinet heads who will start with him on July 1. The city school board approved in a special meeting Tuesday the appointment of new chiefs of staff, academics and human capital. Thornton's current chief of staff, Naomi Gubernick, will come with him to Baltimore. In Milwaukee, Gubernick is known as the woman who runs the nuts and bolts of the system from behind the scenes.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
Regarding Elizabeth Young's recent letter to the editor in response to the need to expand public early education through high-quality pre-kindergarten programs, I think all early education professionals would agree that loving, nurturing parents are a young child's best teachers ( "Loving parents are the best pre-K," Oct. 13). However, a few realities exist today that interfere with parents' ability to take their children to the library or the park for daily informal socialization activities.
BUSINESS
By JON VAN | September 28, 2005
The coming exodus of baby boomers into retirement may draw down the nation's Social Security coffers and overload its golf courses, but to International Business Machines Corp. it looks like a gold mine. IBM plans to announce today an initiative to help enterprises cope with brain drain as large waves of employees near retirement. "Aging population will be one of the major social and business issues of the 21st Century," said Mary Sue Rogers, an executive with IBM's human capital management group.
NEWS
By Adam Seth Litwin | September 5, 2011
Economic experts say it all the time: Amid the fierce competition of the new global marketplace, job one for America is getting the most out of our human capital. Yet even as this asset is deemed of high importance to individual companies and the overall economy, managers have become increasingly reluctant to invest in employee education and training. Labor Day's arrival can serve to remind employers that such investments are critical to an economy whose competitive advantage stems not from how inexpensive our labor is relative to other countries', but rather how capable it is of doing complex work with cutting-edge technology.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,Tribune Media Services | November 26, 2006
Look at your paycheck, and imagine what it will look like next year, the year after that and maybe in 10, 20 or 30 years into the future. Do you see bonds? Perhaps not, but in essence, that's what you are looking at, said Roger Ibbotson, a Yale economist and founder of the research firm Ibbotson Associates Inc. And if you start thinking of your entire work life, and all the paychecks you'll receive until retirement, as a bond, then it should make it easier to figure out what mixture of stocks and bonds is appropriate for you in your 401(k)
NEWS
By Carl Hyman | May 19, 2008
Does Baltimore need to be "remade," as some have recently suggested? The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health is on board, insisting that the basic social organization in the city is out of date, that human capital has been stripped away, and that we need to reinvent something (again). As a concerned city resident and taxpayer, I disagree. I see a world-class city that has been infected by a drug culture that has been allowed to not just survive but thrive here, causing an expensive public health problem.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | January 24, 1995
As a Senate subcommittee draws closer to holding hearings on baseball's exemption from antitrust laws, members of Congress have received a nonpartisan economic report that questions whether the exemption "serves a useful public purpose."The 22-page report, compiled by the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress, also shows how the salary cap the clubs have implemented would benefit the owners in an overwhelming economic way and suggests the novel step of placing new franchises in existing large-revenue markets like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles as a way of leveling revenues between high-revenue and low-revenue clubs.
NEWS
March 9, 2011
Regarding your editorial on lowering college tuition rates for undocumented immigrants ("A flawed compromise," March 8), investing in our youth makes good sense, in particular where education is concerned. If our legislators truly recognized the value of education and how it results in increased productivity that, in turn, leads to increased revenue for the state down the road, they would be funding free tuition to all of our residents. However, cultivating our local "human capital," as you phrase it, will only result in rewards for the state if that capital stays here.
NEWS
By Adam Seth Litwin | September 5, 2011
Economic experts say it all the time: Amid the fierce competition of the new global marketplace, job one for America is getting the most out of our human capital. Yet even as this asset is deemed of high importance to individual companies and the overall economy, managers have become increasingly reluctant to invest in employee education and training. Labor Day's arrival can serve to remind employers that such investments are critical to an economy whose competitive advantage stems not from how inexpensive our labor is relative to other countries', but rather how capable it is of doing complex work with cutting-edge technology.
NEWS
March 9, 2011
Regarding your editorial on lowering college tuition rates for undocumented immigrants ("A flawed compromise," March 8), investing in our youth makes good sense, in particular where education is concerned. If our legislators truly recognized the value of education and how it results in increased productivity that, in turn, leads to increased revenue for the state down the road, they would be funding free tuition to all of our residents. However, cultivating our local "human capital," as you phrase it, will only result in rewards for the state if that capital stays here.
NEWS
By Carl Hyman | May 19, 2008
Does Baltimore need to be "remade," as some have recently suggested? The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health is on board, insisting that the basic social organization in the city is out of date, that human capital has been stripped away, and that we need to reinvent something (again). As a concerned city resident and taxpayer, I disagree. I see a world-class city that has been infected by a drug culture that has been allowed to not just survive but thrive here, causing an expensive public health problem.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 4, 2008
Beyond the dismal graduation rate, attacks on teachers, gangs invading funerals in church and an array of other social pathologies, some see extraordinary opportunity for Baltimore. The city has a new police commissioner who has presided over a stunning falloff in murders this year. It has a bright, engaging new schools chief reaching out to a city immobilized by a general breakdown in civil behavior. Despite the idea that Baltimore's problems are just too big for any individual or group, more than 350 Baltimoreans have responded to Andres Alonso's call for volunteers to support teachers - and to show students that someone wants them to succeed.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | February 2, 2007
Much of what could be gleaned from a recent governmentwide survey of federal workers already was known. The Department of Homeland Security is disorganized, and workers at smaller agencies with very specific missions, such as the National Science Foundation, generally have warmer feelings about their jobs than workers at larger agencies. One surprise, however, is improvements in workplace morale at the Woodlawn-based Social Security Administration since the Office of Personnel Management started soliciting feedback in 2002.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,Tribune Media Services | November 26, 2006
Look at your paycheck, and imagine what it will look like next year, the year after that and maybe in 10, 20 or 30 years into the future. Do you see bonds? Perhaps not, but in essence, that's what you are looking at, said Roger Ibbotson, a Yale economist and founder of the research firm Ibbotson Associates Inc. And if you start thinking of your entire work life, and all the paychecks you'll receive until retirement, as a bond, then it should make it easier to figure out what mixture of stocks and bonds is appropriate for you in your 401(k)
NEWS
October 15, 2013
Regarding Elizabeth Young's recent letter to the editor in response to the need to expand public early education through high-quality pre-kindergarten programs, I think all early education professionals would agree that loving, nurturing parents are a young child's best teachers ( "Loving parents are the best pre-K," Oct. 13). However, a few realities exist today that interfere with parents' ability to take their children to the library or the park for daily informal socialization activities.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 4, 2008
Beyond the dismal graduation rate, attacks on teachers, gangs invading funerals in church and an array of other social pathologies, some see extraordinary opportunity for Baltimore. The city has a new police commissioner who has presided over a stunning falloff in murders this year. It has a bright, engaging new schools chief reaching out to a city immobilized by a general breakdown in civil behavior. Despite the idea that Baltimore's problems are just too big for any individual or group, more than 350 Baltimoreans have responded to Andres Alonso's call for volunteers to support teachers - and to show students that someone wants them to succeed.
BUSINESS
By JON VAN | September 28, 2005
The coming exodus of baby boomers into retirement may draw down the nation's Social Security coffers and overload its golf courses, but to International Business Machines Corp. it looks like a gold mine. IBM plans to announce today an initiative to help enterprises cope with brain drain as large waves of employees near retirement. "Aging population will be one of the major social and business issues of the 21st Century," said Mary Sue Rogers, an executive with IBM's human capital management group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | October 24, 2004
Human Capital By Stephen Amidon. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 384 pages. $25. It's the end of an era -- spring 2001, when the boom of the previous decade is fading and the terrorist threats of the next are fast approaching. But the characters in Stephen Amidon's novel are oblivious to everything except their own tangled fates in a prosperous suburban haven called Totten Crossing. So strong is the pressure to be rich and happy that everyone in town must strive constantly to get ahead with better jobs, bigger cars and fancier houses.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.