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HEALTH
From Sun news services | April 2, 2013
The White House proposed a sweeping new initiative Tuesday to map the individual cells and circuits that make up the human brain, a project that will give scientists a better understanding of how a healthy brain works and how to devise better treatments for injuries and diseases. "There is this enormous mystery waiting to be unlocked," said President Barack Obama of the project unveiled at a White House ceremony packed with scientists. Called the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative, the program would be funded with an initial $100 million from the president's fiscal 2014 budget, which the White House is to release next week.
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NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Here's a no-brainer for you: Your memory doesn't have to get worse with age. In fact, you can actually grow the short-term memory portion of your brain -- and possibly even stave off the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Or so says Dr. Majid Fotuhi, a Harvard- and Johns Hopkins-trained neurologist who has operated a brain center in Lutherville for the past two and a half years, and who this winter opened an even larger brain center in Columbia, a 6,000-square-foot facility on Charter Drive, behind Howard County General Hospital.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 27, 1991
The question itself seems audacious: Can the human brain understand what goes on inside itself? Can people, by thinking about thinking, discover what happens when they think?Although all -- or even most -- of the answers are not in, some researchers believe they are on their way to understanding thought.The theory of thinking "is a very big area now," said Dr. J. Allan Hobson, a Harvard University psychiatrist who studies brain changes when people dream. "We have to regard it as mainly promising, but the methods are there."
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 9, 2013
President Barack Obama wants to invest an initial $110 billion in a study of the human brain that could have benefits as great as those achieved by the Human Genome Project. Maybe the first study should be done on the one-track minds of tea party Republicans who will undoubtedly oppose funding for the study because their brains are fixated on the single idea that government can do nothing right. After that, researchers could move on to figuring out Sarah Palin's brain. Perhaps they could answer this question: How can a person with so little knowledge and so little interest in acquiring knowledge imagine she has what it takes to be president of the United States?
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2002
HOLD A human brain? Stevens Forest Elementary School third-grader Alexis Novotny thought she would have to be much older before she had a chance to do that - at least in seventh grade, she said. "I really though it would be bigger," Alexis said, as she inspected the shape and size of the gray matter she held in Ruth Barth's third-grade science class last week. The children held sheep and horse brains, too. No plastic models in this class. The school has a partnership with the National Museum of Health and Medicine of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
IBM Corp. has won a government contract to build two supercomputers whose speed, company officials say, could for the first time approach the theoretical raw processing power of the human brain. The $290 million contract between IBM and the Department of Energy was expected to be made public today at Supercomputing 2002, the annual high-performance computing conference being held this week in downtown Baltimore. Fast and even faster The first machine, dubbed ASCI Purple, will be capable of performing 100 trillion calculations per second when it's delivered in 2004, the company said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 2002
NEW YORK - Philosophers and theologians may speculate about the essence of human nature, but biologists have a test that should, in principle, deliver an exact definition: compare humans and their close cousin, the chimpanzee, at the finest level possible, and the differences will identify the special ingredient that must be mixed into animal clay to make it human. Researchers have now compared the genetic activity of the chimp and human brain, the organ that presumably holds the vital difference.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 27, 1992
Researchers have discovered that nerve cells in the brains of adult mammals can be stimulated to divide and replenish themselves, a finding that not only challenges long-held scientific beliefs but also carries potentially far-reaching medical implications.If the new findings in mice, published today in the journal Science, hold up for humans as well, they could pave the way toward novel treatments for stroke and other brain injuries, scientists said yesterday.For decades, scientists have believed that nerve cells in the human brain grow abundantly during embryonic development, then stop growing and dividing soon after birth.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Here's a no-brainer for you: Your memory doesn't have to get worse with age. In fact, you can actually grow the short-term memory portion of your brain -- and possibly even stave off the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Or so says Dr. Majid Fotuhi, a Harvard- and Johns Hopkins-trained neurologist who has operated a brain center in Lutherville for the past two and a half years, and who this winter opened an even larger brain center in Columbia, a 6,000-square-foot facility on Charter Drive, behind Howard County General Hospital.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2006
One of the most intriguing mysteries of biology is why humans are the only species with a brain smart enough to ponder their own existence. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, believe they have discovered a possible answer: a gene that has undergone powerful mutations in the past 5 million years that may partly account for the accelerated evolution of the human brain. Reporting this week in the online version of the British journal Nature, the scientists said they do not know exactly what the gene does, but that it is active at a key time and place in embryonic development when the brain is growing at its fastest pace.
HEALTH
From Sun news services | April 2, 2013
The White House proposed a sweeping new initiative Tuesday to map the individual cells and circuits that make up the human brain, a project that will give scientists a better understanding of how a healthy brain works and how to devise better treatments for injuries and diseases. "There is this enormous mystery waiting to be unlocked," said President Barack Obama of the project unveiled at a White House ceremony packed with scientists. Called the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative, the program would be funded with an initial $100 million from the president's fiscal 2014 budget, which the White House is to release next week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lefavor | November 29, 2011
After releasing her 1997 debut album "Baduizm," it didn't take long for Erykah Badu's jazzy R&B feel and bold, earthy style to earn her the title of "first lady of neo-soul. " Four Grammy awards and four albums later, she is still inventing her own sound. Her latest project is the Cannabinoids, a digital band made up of musicians and producers from her hometown of Dallas. With its debut album set to be released in early 2012, the group hopes to create a sensational, electronic musical experience for its audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Lonni Sue Johnson spends every spare moment creating word puzzles superimposed on elaborate grids. The moment she puts one down, she starts on the next. In not quite three years, she has amassed a stack of paper that is 15 feet high. Family member say that's how she pins down time. "In order to grasp the present moment before it vanishes from her memory, Lonni Sue urgently writes and draws," says her sister, Aline Johnson. "As she works on her puzzles, her thoughts — which would otherwise be constantly slipping away — are held on the page, where she can build ideas.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
As websites buzzed with the news of Osama bin Laden's death, Baltimore resident Gin Ferrara restricted herself to work-related Web browsing only. Not that she wasn't curious about the startling commando raid in Pakistan. But the news broke during one of her periodic weeklong breaks from media, during which she limits her use of the Internet at work and cuts herself off completely in her downtime. "All the news about bin Laden's death is not going to settle down in a week," reasoned Ferrara, 38, who works at NewsTrust, a California-based nonprofit funded by several foundations that is running an experimental news criticism website in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Jean Arp's 1959 sculpture "The Woman of Delos" is a symphony of rolling curves. The figure is full-bodied and undulating. Despite the material used to make it - plaster - it conveys an impression of forgiving softness. There's a concave shape on the upper left, where the woman's head curves into her shoulder, and a convex shape on the lower right, where her arm is connected to her torso. Though Arp may not have been consciously aware of all that he was doing, "The Woman of Delos" is almost perfectly designed to stimulate certain pleasurable mechanisms in the human brain.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | April 8, 2007
You could stare for years at The Creation of Adam, and never notice it. But once someone points out the metaphor in Michelangelo's masterpiece, it's hard to interpret it any other way. Focus on the purple cloak swirling around the deity and his host of angels (as a medical student named F.L. Meshberger did in 1990, in an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association). Notice, especially, how the fabric gathers and tucks. Doesn't it resemble a side view of the human brain, attached to its flexible column of spinal cord?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 23, 1999
Regular running and intensive mental exercise may revitalize the mind by spurring the growth of new brain cells responsible for learning and memory, new animal experiments suggest.The research, made public yesterday, sheds light on how the effects of daily experience can foster new brain cells in adult mammals from mice to humans. The research suggests that an active life -- physical or mental -- can have a positive impact on the brain.In separate studies published in Nature Neuroscience, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego and at Princeton University discovered that some kinds of physical and mental exercise promoted the growth of new neurons, while also measurably prolonging the survival of existing brain cells.
NEWS
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,CHICAGO TRIUBNE | September 9, 2005
CHICAGO - New research suggests that the human brain is still evolving, a process that may ultimately increase people's capacity to grow smarter. Two key brain-building genes, which underwent drastic changes in the past that coincided with huge leaps in human intellectual development, are still undergoing rapid mutations, evolution's way of selecting for new beneficial traits, Bruce Lahn and his colleagues at the University of Chicago reported in today's...
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2006
One of the most intriguing mysteries of biology is why humans are the only species with a brain smart enough to ponder their own existence. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, believe they have discovered a possible answer: a gene that has undergone powerful mutations in the past 5 million years that may partly account for the accelerated evolution of the human brain. Reporting this week in the online version of the British journal Nature, the scientists said they do not know exactly what the gene does, but that it is active at a key time and place in embryonic development when the brain is growing at its fastest pace.
NEWS
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,CHICAGO TRIUBNE | September 9, 2005
CHICAGO - New research suggests that the human brain is still evolving, a process that may ultimately increase people's capacity to grow smarter. Two key brain-building genes, which underwent drastic changes in the past that coincided with huge leaps in human intellectual development, are still undergoing rapid mutations, evolution's way of selecting for new beneficial traits, Bruce Lahn and his colleagues at the University of Chicago reported in today's...
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