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By www.water.com | July 13, 2003
Up to 60 percent of the human body is water. The brain is 75 percent water. Blood is 82 percent water, and the lungs are nearly 90 percent water.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
William Smith's disease has grim milestones. At 2, the Gambrills triplet known as Mick couldn't walk or talk as well as his siblings. In kindergarten, he started losing language and motor skills. At 12, he needed a wheelchair and a feeding tube. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital dedicated to treating his symptoms said he had an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. But a new test may provide something the family has long sought: a name. "The idea that there is something out there that can tell you [what's wrong]
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1997
For a chance to view the human body in a way unlike they had ever seen, Anitha Papudesi and Lillian Ponte took a quick detour on their way out of Baltimore to stop by the Maryland Science Center."
NEWS
By Mike Kettelberger, Capital News Service | April 6, 2014
Ashley Gable of Pasadena paints her artwork on an unusual canvas: the human body. "I think body painting is a very challenging medium," said Gable, 21, "because it takes the 2-D work that you would put onto a canvas, and it makes it come to life. " Gable, a lifelong resident of Anne Arundel County and a Chesapeake High School graduate, creates living, breathing works of art - painting pretty much anyone who is willing to sit still for a few hours to make them resemble a character, a creature or some type of abstract design.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 26, 1993
Both the sculptures of Karen Acker and the paintings of Emilio Cruz are based on the human figure and use somewhat unusual combinations of materials, and that's only the beginning of what they have in common.Cruz begins with long, narrow white birch panels which he covers with a layer of gesso. On this he then draws the human figure in charcoal and covers it with a layer of beeswax, into which he cuts deep lines to create additional drawing. Finally he adds paint.Acker combines porcelain, steel and sometimes wood into sculptures which also have reference to the human body.
NEWS
May 15, 2012
In response to the letter from Fred D. Murray of Pikesville ("God will punish President Obama for endorsing same-sex marriage," May 12): No Fred, President Barack Obama will not go to hell for accepting same-sex marriage, because there is no hell. Actually, there is no heaven or a god to run the place! Gods were created by the human mind to placate the fears of the cave dwellers who were scared to death about lightning, thunder and floods. The idea of controlling groups of people caught on and continues today for the convenience of folks in high places.
FEATURES
By Leslie Cauley | January 12, 1992
In the 1966 sci-fi classic "Fantastic Voyage," a team of medical experts is reduced to microscopic size and injected inside a human being. They engage in a fantastical battle with an army of white corpuscles, take a roller-coaster ride through the cavernous chambers of the heart and get a microbe's view of the human body, in all its Technicolor glory and anatomical wonder.Pure Hollywood?Maybe not.Technologies are under development today that in the not-so-distant future may permit medical researchers to explorethe human body much like the microscopic stars of "Fantastic Voyage" -- by plumbing the depths of the anatomy from within.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Kenneally and Christine Kenneally,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2000
While living in Iowa two years ago, I saw the sky turn green. A number of events rapidly followed: The tornado sirens blared, my husband and I took shelter downstairs, and the Weather Channel visuals blipped off the television set. Then the electricity went out, and I frantically wondered if I had remembered to recharge the radio's batteries so we could monitor the tornado's movement. Had I? Of course not. For me, and for most people in the developed world, the occasional power disruption cannot disrupt the expectation that as sure as the sun rises, the lights will go on in the morning when the bedroom switch is clicked.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
I am responding to a researcher's questionnaire about editing and the role of the editor. One question invites me to suggest a metaphor for editing, and the first that occurred to me is one I have made previously in these dispatches: surgery. Editors must deal with the text as it is. Sometimes the best we can achieve is to make the substandard mediocre, because, as I often quote Anthony Trollope, "One cannot pour out of a jug more than is in it. " So we as editors start looking for diseased tissue to excise.
NEWS
By Mike Kettelberger, Capital News Service | April 6, 2014
Ashley Gable of Pasadena paints her artwork on an unusual canvas: the human body. "I think body painting is a very challenging medium," said Gable, 21, "because it takes the 2-D work that you would put onto a canvas, and it makes it come to life. " Gable, a lifelong resident of Anne Arundel County and a Chesapeake High School graduate, creates living, breathing works of art - painting pretty much anyone who is willing to sit still for a few hours to make them resemble a character, a creature or some type of abstract design.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
I am responding to a researcher's questionnaire about editing and the role of the editor. One question invites me to suggest a metaphor for editing, and the first that occurred to me is one I have made previously in these dispatches: surgery. Editors must deal with the text as it is. Sometimes the best we can achieve is to make the substandard mediocre, because, as I often quote Anthony Trollope, "One cannot pour out of a jug more than is in it. " So we as editors start looking for diseased tissue to excise.
NEWS
May 15, 2012
In response to the letter from Fred D. Murray of Pikesville ("God will punish President Obama for endorsing same-sex marriage," May 12): No Fred, President Barack Obama will not go to hell for accepting same-sex marriage, because there is no hell. Actually, there is no heaven or a god to run the place! Gods were created by the human mind to placate the fears of the cave dwellers who were scared to death about lightning, thunder and floods. The idea of controlling groups of people caught on and continues today for the convenience of folks in high places.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | March 23, 2008
I am gearing up to see the Body Worlds exhibit at the Baltimore Science Center. From what I have read, I don't think I could have dreamed up a more bizarre yet impressive tool for the study of human anatomy and physiology. Apparently, in 1977, when my biggest concern was coming up with the perfect prom dress, Dr. Gunther von Hagens was coming up with a method he called plastination. Plastination halts the decay process in deceased humans by removing fats and water from the body and infusing it with polymers -- basically preserving it from the inside out. Body Worlds puts these individuals on display in life-like scenarios.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2004
DRINKING diet soda might help your waistline, but it won't do any favors for your teeth. Although mineral-rich enamel is the hardest surface in the human body, it's not a match for the old-fashioned American soft drink - including the sugar-free kind. In a study to be published next month, researchers found that the regular and diet versions of popular drinks such as Pepsi and Coke caused the same amount of dental erosion. "I was always convinced that there was going to be a difference in the way diet drinks and regular drinks affect teeth," said J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, professor of biomaterials science at the University of Maryland Dental School and lead author of the study.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,The Hartford Courant | March 21, 2004
Richard Saul Wurman envisions the day when our bodies will have "dashboards" -- hand-held devices to monitor, access and store data on our vital functions -- much the way car dashboards keep us informed on fuel levels, temperature, speed and electrical systems as we drive. To keep our personal "machines" in good working order in the meantime, the best-selling author and design expert has produced Understanding Healthcare (TOP, $25), a combination of an owner's manual for the human body and a roadmap to health, wellness and diseases, as well as medical services, costs and coverage.
NEWS
November 9, 2003
If the veins, arteries and capillaries in the human body were combined, they would equal about 93,000 miles in length. - Facts at Your Fingertips (Reader's Digest)
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2002
With the international race to decipher human DNA now mostly history, some biologists are embarking on an even more sweeping molecular mission: to catalog all the proteins in the human body. On Monday, 180 scientists will converge in Washington to hash out a battle plan for the titanic effort, already under way in many laboratories around the world. "This is the next step in the evolution of our understanding of what life is all about," says George Kenyon, a University of Michigan biochemist who organized the National Academy of Sciences meeting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 2, 2003
Photographer Connie Imboden's Hampden studio looks like a cross between a building supply shed and an amusement park fun house that's not quite up to code. Industrial-strength lights and electrical cords run all over the place, yards of black cloth hang from clamps on movable stands, and a huge distorting mirror -- its silver backing rubbed off so that it resembles a foggy windshield on a rainy night -- stands nearby. The walls are cinderblock, the floors are concrete and the only comfortable furniture is a small, cushioned chair wedged between some backdrops and the mirror, which is sandwiched between two wooden benches.
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