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NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | September 18, 1993
The biggest problem with ''Afrocentric'' education to my mind is that only black people seem to be getting it. White people need it just as badly. Otherwise they won't know who they are, either.We are told that everybody should know their own history. That's the whole rationale for introducing ''multicultural'' curriculums in the public schools, as Baltimore has begun to do this year. Eighty percent of the city public school population is African-American. School officials say the new curriculum is needed to correct the omissions, distortions and inaccuracies concerning the contributions of minorities to American and world history.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz says he believes Councilman Todd Huff -- who was arrested last weekend on DUI charges -- will learn from his mistakes, and called the Lutherville Republican a diligent councilman.   "We elect human beings to office, and human beings make mistakes," the county executive told the Sun on Friday, after a Towson press event with Sen. Ben Cardin to discuss the sequester. "The real test of a human being is how they respond after making mistakes.
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SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | August 14, 1995
He was bigger than life. But he was only human.Mickey Mantle should be remembered as the blond-haired, thickly muscled Oklahoman who became one of baseball's all-time greats.He also should be remembered as the gaunt, frail figure whose alcoholism was at least partly responsible for the liver cancer that left him dead at the age of 63.One image cannot endure without the other.To savor Mantle simply as a sports hero is to ignore his life of excess.But to dwell on his shortcomings is to ignore his mythic place in American sports history.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: SOBRIQUET Adam started us in the naming business, according to Genesis, and human beings have been keen to name objects, animals, other human beings, concepts, and themselves ever since. Many of us have, in addition to our formal birth names, one or more casual names, or nicknames.
NEWS
February 1, 2004
On January 7, 2004, GREGORY ALLEN ELIZONDO.Friends and fami ly will gather on Sunday, February 8, 6 P.M. at the Peabody Court Hotel to remember this most wonderful of human beings in a Celebration of Life. Inquiries please call (410) 962-7074.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz says he believes Councilman Todd Huff -- who was arrested last weekend on DUI charges -- will learn from his mistakes, and called the Lutherville Republican a diligent councilman.   "We elect human beings to office, and human beings make mistakes," the county executive told the Sun on Friday, after a Towson press event with Sen. Ben Cardin to discuss the sequester. "The real test of a human being is how they respond after making mistakes.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 24, 2006
Only one animal has chosen to be our ally and our friend. When that dog decides to bond to us, that's eternal. It's never going to change. ... Human beings have failed dogs constantly. I've never heard of a dog failing a human being." - ROBERT LIVAS, Will County, Ill., circuit judge, as he sentenced a man to 15 months in prison for killing a puppy
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: SOBRIQUET Adam started us in the naming business, according to Genesis, and human beings have been keen to name objects, animals, other human beings, concepts, and themselves ever since. Many of us have, in addition to our formal birth names, one or more casual names, or nicknames.
NEWS
By WALTER T. ANDERSON | June 21, 1995
The boundary line between human beings and animals has never been altogether clear. Now -- as we read about laboratory mice with human genes and contemplate a future of pig-to-people organ transplants -- the ancient fantasy of a chimera, a being part human and part animal, is fast becoming a scientific reality.The news from the laboratories is spectacular and more than a little science-fictionish. Among the new creatures that have been created is the ''oncomouse,'' which develops human cancers, and other mice that model other human ailments such as Alzheimer's and diabetes.
NEWS
August 5, 2008
For the young women who dance in bars and clubs on The Block, Baltimore's adult entertainment district, life is a few days or weeks of cheap thrills, then years of drug addiction, abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, emotional torment and early death. Few newcomers realize the future that awaits them. As The Sun's Jonathan Bor reported last week in an article about the health risks faced by prostitutes, their odds of escaping it are vanishingly small. Mr. Bor's story focused on city public health workers' efforts to help dancers on The Block avoid HIV infection by giving them free condoms and clean needles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassandra Berube | October 22, 2012
"Human. " While that is something most people probably believe they are, Deb is forced to question her humanity once she realized she was glad that Speltzer is dead. Everyone has their humanity explored, as both their good side and their flaws are exposed. Deb pushes Dexter about his loss of Rita, about whether Dexter (through his Dark Passenger) is really to blame for it. To be honest, he is at least responsible in part, but it was completely unnecessary to bring that up. Despite his tendency to slice and dice human flesh, Dexter does maintain compassion for some human beings, such as Deb herself (which is why he continually saves her instead of letting fate run its course)
NEWS
By Margaret Benner | June 6, 2012
There won't be a big news story about Gregory Seagle's death. And that's a shame, because if there was ever anyone on this planet who deserved to be publicly remembered for how he lived, it was Greg, who died last week from cancer at 61. Greg was a writer and a teacher. It's hard to say which undertaking he liked better; it's easy to say how talented he was at both. But actually, the two careers were intertwined because Greg taught writing. He was an adjunct and then a lecturer at Towson University, with few benefits and little job security.
NEWS
January 20, 2012
Has there been a more polarizing figure in professional sports over the past year than Tim Tebow? Whether it was his string of fourth-quarter comebacks, thrilling overtime playoff victory over the Steelers or public displays of his faith, Mr. Tebow generates a wide range of reactions from the public. Mr. Tebow's faith is an integral part of the player, the man and the human being. Today, when media outlets are littered with players' indiscretions and mistakes, it's refreshing to see someone who practices what he preaches.
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | February 23, 2011
Woe to those who, to the very end, insist on regulating the movement that surpasses them with the narrow mind of the mechanic who changes a tire. Georges Bataille, The Accursed Share Watson, an IBM-designed computer, just defeated two of "Jeopardy's" best players. While this is not the first time a computer beat humans in a game — Deep Blue topped a chess champion several years ago — Watson's victory is striking. Before a national audience, computer intelligence outdid its human creator and adversary in speed and memory.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | August 22, 2010
Reggie Prasad wants to stop slot machines from coming anywhere near Arundel Mills mall, but he has never heard of the Maryland Jockey Club, the track owner working toward the same goal. He has never been coached on talking points by the Ford Group, the public relations agency being paid by the corporate suits fighting slots at the mall. He doesn't know superlawyer Alan M. Rifkin or anybody else associated with the jillion-dollar offensive of anti-slots TV ads, news releases and litigation.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | September 27, 2009
Committing yourself for 12 hours to any TV production is a big deal. But before you decide you don't have the time for Ken Burns' new multipart documentary, "The National Parks: America's Best Idea," consider just giving it a 30-minute tryout. Watch the first half-hour tonight on PBS, and I bet you will become hooked on one of the best and most rewarding viewing experiences of the TV year. This is a film with both beauty and brains - it is gorgeous to look at, it will make you think and possibly even stir your soul.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | December 2, 2008
MUMBAI, India - With a bit of pluck, even if was not always heartfelt, a touch of defiance and a dose of the city's famous resilience, Mumbai dusted itself off yesterday from last week's terrorist attack and headed back to work. The trains were reasonably packed, traffic was beginning to resemble its normally chaotic self and shoppers eased back into the stores, even if many still were not buying much. "Sure I'm scared," said Roshan Tengra, a housewife, as she headed into a Bank of India branch a few blocks from the Taj Mahal Palace and Tower hotel where the most protracted militant attack occurred.
NEWS
August 5, 2008
For the young women who dance in bars and clubs on The Block, Baltimore's adult entertainment district, life is a few days or weeks of cheap thrills, then years of drug addiction, abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, emotional torment and early death. Few newcomers realize the future that awaits them. As The Sun's Jonathan Bor reported last week in an article about the health risks faced by prostitutes, their odds of escaping it are vanishingly small. Mr. Bor's story focused on city public health workers' efforts to help dancers on The Block avoid HIV infection by giving them free condoms and clean needles.
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