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NEWS
July 16, 2013
The changes coming with the 2015 MCAT exam represent an important shift in the way we assess and prepare tomorrow's doctors ("A better MCAT may not produce better doctors," July 10). We recognize that these changes may bring challenges for aspiring doctors, especially those who have taken non-traditional paths to medical school. Yet this evolution of the MCAT exam will help medical schools better identify not only the students who are the most academically prepared to become physicians, but also those who have the potential to become the best doctors in a changing health care system.
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NEWS
July 16, 2013
The changes coming with the 2015 MCAT exam represent an important shift in the way we assess and prepare tomorrow's doctors ("A better MCAT may not produce better doctors," July 10). We recognize that these changes may bring challenges for aspiring doctors, especially those who have taken non-traditional paths to medical school. Yet this evolution of the MCAT exam will help medical schools better identify not only the students who are the most academically prepared to become physicians, but also those who have the potential to become the best doctors in a changing health care system.
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BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | October 25, 1992
New York -- What is it like if you know for sure that the U.S. economy is faced with a period of prolonged economic turmoil? If you're Richard Mogey, you can always take comfort in knowing that we're also heading for a cultural Renaissance.Mr. Mogey, who heads the non-profit Foundation for the Study of Cycles, believes both predictions because he uses cycles to map the past and gauge the future. With more than 30,000 cycles at his foundation's disposal, Mr. Mogey confidently claims that the economy is the pits, the world is more idealistic than in the past, and modern art is pretty much dead.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 19, 2012
It is one thing to talk about "fairness" when it comes to allowing gays and lesbians to marry; it is quite another to claim biblical authority for such relationships. President Barack Obama cited the "Golden Rule" about treating others as you would like to be treated, but in doing so he ignored the totality of Scripture and the Lord himself, who alone gets to set the rules for human behavior. The president says he is a "practicing Christian. " It is difficult to be one while simultaneously holding a low view of the Bible, which his position on several social issues might suggest.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2004
There are few things more thoroughly human than our impulse to say something about ourselves in the way we dress or decorate our bodies and our clothing. A wedding ring, a sailor's tattoo, a Muslim chador or a Yankees baseball cap -- each is intended to deliver an unspoken message about the wearer that is intelligible to those who see it. Scientists aren't sure when this modern human trait first appeared. But anthropologists digging in the sandy floor of Blombos Cave, a rocky shelter high above the Indian Ocean in South Africa, believe they have found the earliest evidence yet of human symbolic ornamentation.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Paul Muhler's home-game routine starts with a check of the weather. If it's warm, Muhler pulls on his purple shorts, one of his Ravens T-shirts and a string of purple beads. On cold days, he opts for his mottled gray and purple camouflage fatigues and Ravens parka. Either way, he tops it off with a floppy purple and black jester's hat. The odd getup doesn't raise an eyebrow from Muhler's friends and family, who have come to accept his bursts of eccentricity during football season. They know his other side, his reassuring weekday persona as a computer technician for a local bank, the father of two grown children, 44-year-old husband of 23 years, and a suburban homeowner from Harford County.
NEWS
December 3, 2007
SEYMOUR BENZER, 86 Pioneer of neuroscience Seymour Benzer, a groundbreaking biologist whose work linking behavior and genes laid the foundation for modern neuroscience, died of a stroke Friday at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, Calif., said Jill Perry, a spokeswoman for the California Institute of Technology, where Dr. Benzer was professor emeritus. Dr. Benzer's research in the 1960s countered the common belief that human behavior was shaped primarily by environment, giving genetics a far bigger role than they were previously assigned.
NEWS
By Paul Billings & Jonathan Beckwith | July 20, 1993
In an era when researchers have located the genes for conditions such as Huntington's disease, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy, some scientists believe that "homosexual" genes will soon be found.It comes as no surprise, then, that lately the popular press has been humming with stories about whether homosexuality is genetically determined. We are uneasy about the current unbridled enthusiasm for studies relating genes with human behavior.Scientists' arguments for a biological basis for human differences have previously been used for insidious ends; the arguments by German scientists before World War II for the genetic inferiority of Jews is just one example.
FEATURES
By Kevin W. McCullough and Kevin W. McCullough,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2005
Smoking might be less common in movies than has been perceived, researchers have reported, adding that movie characters who do light up are more likely to be lower-class bad guys, not glamorized heroes. By tracking the smoking habits of lead characters in 477 popular American films released from 1990 through 1998, researchers found that the smoking rate was similar to the smoking rate in the population at large: 23.3 percent in movies and 21.8 percent in real life. "This is the first objective study of smoking in the movies," said the study's lead author, Dr. Karan Omidvari, a physician in the Heart and Vascular Institute at St. Michael's Medical Center in Newark, N.J. He added that previous studies were subjective and sometimes unscientific.
EXPLORE
December 13, 2011
Half a century ago, the future was an oft-discussed topic. There would be flying cars in skyways that would have replaced our highways. Colonies in space or on the moon? Heck, there was serious talk of commuting to and from space stations. Oh yeah, there would be no money. Instead things would be bought and sold through an automated system that linked credit and cash on hand in an account. Cars don't fly, highways on the ground are congested and no one commutes to the International Space Station, at least not on a daily basis, but 50 years after a space age vision of the future was a subject of discussion for an optimistic America, one prediction has nearly come true: cash just ain't what it used to be. Sure, just about everyone carries a few bucks, maybe even a Jackson or two, but most transactions involving double digit dollar amounts are conducted in the space age way. Swipe a card, tap a token or simply punch in a code on a keypad and hundreds or even thousands of dollars (virtual dollars, actually)
EXPLORE
December 13, 2011
Half a century ago, the future was an oft-discussed topic. There would be flying cars in skyways that would have replaced our highways. Colonies in space or on the moon? Heck, there was serious talk of commuting to and from space stations. Oh yeah, there would be no money. Instead things would be bought and sold through an automated system that linked credit and cash on hand in an account. Cars don't fly, highways on the ground are congested and no one commutes to the International Space Station, at least not on a daily basis, but 50 years after a space age vision of the future was a subject of discussion for an optimistic America, one prediction has nearly come true: cash just ain't what it used to be. Sure, just about everyone carries a few bucks, maybe even a Jackson or two, but most transactions involving double digit dollar amounts are conducted in the space age way. Swipe a card, tap a token or simply punch in a code on a keypad and hundreds or even thousands of dollars (virtual dollars, actually)
NEWS
July 28, 2008
Genes can't explain all human behavior David P. Barash is a superb scientist but a lousy sociologist ("Monkeying with evolution," Commentary, July 24). As a historian of science, I fully accept the evolutionary explanation of human origins and the idea that our genes influence everything from eye color to temperament. But I also recognize the fallacy in Mr. Barash's argument. Science is not simply an apolitical search for truth. Seemingly objective criteria such as race and measures of cogitation are riddled with subjective cultural assumptions.
NEWS
December 3, 2007
SEYMOUR BENZER, 86 Pioneer of neuroscience Seymour Benzer, a groundbreaking biologist whose work linking behavior and genes laid the foundation for modern neuroscience, died of a stroke Friday at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, Calif., said Jill Perry, a spokeswoman for the California Institute of Technology, where Dr. Benzer was professor emeritus. Dr. Benzer's research in the 1960s countered the common belief that human behavior was shaped primarily by environment, giving genetics a far bigger role than they were previously assigned.
NEWS
By Jodi S. Cohen and Jodi S. Cohen,Chicago Tribune | March 16, 2007
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- In her dorm at the University of Michigan, Denise Rowe looks as much like a sick patient as a student. Before she eats a meal, goes to sleep at night, or even kisses her boyfriend, she first has to slip off the blue surgical mask that covers her nose and mouth and hooks around her ears. Didn't freshmen already have enough pressure to fit in? "People do kind of look at you weird," said Rowe, 18, the outline of her mouth moving behind the cotton mask. Around the Ann Arbor campus this winter, 1,400 students have been participating in a study to learn whether wearing masks makes a difference in who gets the flu. About 830 of them are assigned to wear the devices for six weeks, while the rest take no precautions.
NEWS
By Adil E. Shamoo | October 22, 2006
What has my new country, the United States, done to my old country, Iraq? The Baghdad I knew growing up was a place where people of different faiths and different sects lived in an atmosphere of tolerance and acceptance. Though my family encountered some discrimination because we were Christians, hostility and violence were rare. Compare that with Iraq today. A recent Johns Hopkins University report put the number of violent Iraqi civilian deaths at more than 600,000since the U.S. invasion.
NEWS
By GORDON LIVINGSTON | May 19, 2006
The recent difficulties occasioned by the abuse of "prescription medication" on the part of radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh and Democratic Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy of Rhode Island have again raised the issue of the disease model of addiction vs. the concepts of legal and personal responsibility. It has been said that "truth is a matter of emphasis." To understand this concept clinically, consider the struggle we have in dealing with the tension between biological predisposition and volitional behavior.
FEATURES
By Diane Winston | April 10, 1991
Politely but firmly, Miss Manners looked straight at seventy-odd students, teachers and aficionados of philosophy and took the whole lot to task."I came here to complain," the arbiter of etiquette told a roomful of academics at Johns Hopkins University. "Philosophers are not paying enough attention to manners."Judith Martin, whose alter ego "Miss Manners" is beloved by million of readers nationwide, was the guest speaker yesterday at a philosophy department seminar in the Milton Eisenhower Library.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | November 17, 1990
HISTORY IS FULL of warfare, and can be written as little else. A school of revisionist historians, concentrating on violent themes in American history with isolationist blinders, replaced one misperception with another. There was never anything peculiarly American about American violence.But what if the frequency of warfare recounted in the Book of Judges, the Iliad and other ancient texts were carried out with all the wonders of late 20th-century science? Computers, nuclear fusion, missile-delivered anthrax disease and nerve gas make us think that war must be abolished as a human practice.
NEWS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN AND PAUL ADAMS and LAURA SMITHERMAN AND PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTERS | October 11, 2005
The most widely used exercise in game theory, the field that drew the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences this year, has nothing to do with economics. It's called the "prisoner's dilemma" and examines the choices of two criminals to stay mum or confess and implicate their cohort. The dilemma is a favorite teaching tool of Thomas C. Schelling, a professor at the University of Maryland who won the Nobel yesterday. The prize committee bestowed the honor on Schelling and Israeli-American Robert J. Aumann for their research on game theory.
FEATURES
By Kevin W. McCullough and Kevin W. McCullough,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2005
Smoking might be less common in movies than has been perceived, researchers have reported, adding that movie characters who do light up are more likely to be lower-class bad guys, not glamorized heroes. By tracking the smoking habits of lead characters in 477 popular American films released from 1990 through 1998, researchers found that the smoking rate was similar to the smoking rate in the population at large: 23.3 percent in movies and 21.8 percent in real life. "This is the first objective study of smoking in the movies," said the study's lead author, Dr. Karan Omidvari, a physician in the Heart and Vascular Institute at St. Michael's Medical Center in Newark, N.J. He added that previous studies were subjective and sometimes unscientific.
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