Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHula Hoop
IN THE NEWS

Hula Hoop

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 14, 2014
More than 55 years after it became a national craze, the Harford County Public Library is giving residents an opportunity to show off their Hula Hoop skills at the Hoopla Hoop Contest Tuesday, July 15, at the Abingdon Library. Hoopla Hoop will be presented by MidWest Tape, the library's provider of Hoopla digital media. A representative of the company will be on hand to run the contest and award the winner with a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3. "Summer fun at the Library will take on a whole new meaning as young and old Hoopla Hoop at the Abingdon Library," Library Marketing Manager Janine Lis said in a statement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 14, 2014
More than 55 years after it became a national craze, the Harford County Public Library is giving residents an opportunity to show off their Hula Hoop skills at the Hoopla Hoop Contest Tuesday, July 15, at the Abingdon Library. Hoopla Hoop will be presented by MidWest Tape, the library's provider of Hoopla digital media. A representative of the company will be on hand to run the contest and award the winner with a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3. "Summer fun at the Library will take on a whole new meaning as young and old Hoopla Hoop at the Abingdon Library," Library Marketing Manager Janine Lis said in a statement.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 18, 2008
RICHARD KNERR, 82 Founder of Wham-O Richard Knerr, co-founder of the toy company that popularized the Hula Hoop, Frisbee and other fads that became classics, has died. He was 82. Mr. Knerr, who started Wham-O in 1948 with childhood friend Arthur "Spud" Melin, died Monday at a hospital after suffering a stroke earlier in the day at his Arcadia, Calif., home, his wife, Dorothy, told the Los Angeles Times. Mr. Knerr and Mr. Melin got their start in business peddling slingshots. They named their enterprise Wham-O.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
The rhythmic thud of the drum filled the air of Baltimore's Waverly community, alerting residents that something special was taking place in the neighborhood. The joyous sound of children's laughter and eventual singing reinforced the sense of community organizers envisioned when they planned Sunday's parade and subsequent concert in a 25-foot-by-25-foot translucent bubble. "It's whimsical. When people see it, they want to go in and enjoy it," said Seattle-based conceptual artist Nola Elsewhere, who dreamed up the concept of the bubble that housed the singing and music.
FEATURES
November 21, 1990
Fashion, like the hula hoop, comes around to remind us of younger days and simpler pleasures. In the Sixties, Sonny and Cher were artists, Jackie was the queen of Camelot and wrongs could be righted with peace and love, man. We learned.Designers, it appears, haven't learned. At the spring collections in New York, there were resurrections of hippy bell-bottom pants, bubble hairdos, and silly neo-psychedelic patterns. A patchwork of clothes to make former flower children cringe.On the very hip and the very thin the old looks look fresh and new, but if you remember Nancy Sinatra's boots, just walk away and don't look back.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | January 15, 2008
About two dozen women and men trooped into a Charles Village church on a recent afternoon to slough off winter pounds and become more in touch with their bodies. They did not use complicated exercise machines or torturous-looking Pilates devices, but something far more friendly and familiar: the hula hoop. "I hate the thought of going to the gym, but pick up a hoop and it can be playtime," said Noelle Powers, 30, who is teaching the six-week course. "It's a great way to burn calories and strengthen muscles, especially core muscles, and it can be very meditative."
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | July 6, 2009
Standing in a lot next to M&T Bank Stadium, Aaliyah McCray, 12, slipped the blue hula hoop over her head and faced Chris Pierce, 9. "Ready, set, go!" shouted Ashley Bertrand, who was refereeing the contest. Cheers erupted as the two swung their hoops and began moving their hips, working to keep the rings up. A few seconds later, the hoops clattered to the ground about the same time. "A tie," Bertrand said. The two competed again, with Aaliyah eventually winning. The contest, put on by Maryland Physicians Care's Healthy Groove program, was part of this year's African American Heritage Festival, which celebrates black culture and history.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1994
Nature will be putting on another sky show tomorrow night -- a partial eclipse of the moon. And it's no celestial accident that the eclipse comes just two weeks after the May 10 solar eclipse.Weather permitting, Marylanders willing to stay up past 11:30 p.m. will be able to watch the bottom of the moon darken as it passes through the edge of the shadow that the Earth casts into space. Only 24 percent of the full moon will be obscured by the top of the Earth's circular shadow.The entire eclipse will be visible wherever skies are clear in the eastern half of North America, all of Central and South America and in northwestern portions of Africa.
NEWS
July 1, 2002
Robert L.J. Long, 82, who was the Hawaii-based commander in chief of all U.S. military forces in the Pacific for four years, died Thursday in Honolulu. Admiral Long, a resident of Annapolis, died at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda. Admiral Long headed the Pacific Command from October 1979 until his retirement in July 1983. A native of Kansas City, Mo., he graduated from the Naval Academy in 1943. He earned the Bronze Star while serving aboard the battleship USS Colorado in the western Pacific during World War II. He later attended submarine school and commanded several submarines before joining the staff of Adm. Hyman Rickover in 1959.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
The rhythmic thud of the drum filled the air of Baltimore's Waverly community, alerting residents that something special was taking place in the neighborhood. The joyous sound of children's laughter and eventual singing reinforced the sense of community organizers envisioned when they planned Sunday's parade and subsequent concert in a 25-foot-by-25-foot translucent bubble. "It's whimsical. When people see it, they want to go in and enjoy it," said Seattle-based conceptual artist Nola Elsewhere, who dreamed up the concept of the bubble that housed the singing and music.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2011
Go ahead and bang a drum, hang from the curtains and spin that hula hoop. Area gym instructors say it's good for you, even if you don't realize it. The unconventional workouts are part of a movement to keep the masses focused on their fitness by disguising exercise as playtime, like spinach in brownies. And while more conventional spin, yoga and Latin dance-inspired Zumba aerobics classes remain gym staples, the quirky and even slightly juvenile additions have been attracting regulars.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | July 6, 2009
Standing in a lot next to M&T Bank Stadium, Aaliyah McCray, 12, slipped the blue hula hoop over her head and faced Chris Pierce, 9. "Ready, set, go!" shouted Ashley Bertrand, who was refereeing the contest. Cheers erupted as the two swung their hoops and began moving their hips, working to keep the rings up. A few seconds later, the hoops clattered to the ground about the same time. "A tie," Bertrand said. The two competed again, with Aaliyah eventually winning. The contest, put on by Maryland Physicians Care's Healthy Groove program, was part of this year's African American Heritage Festival, which celebrates black culture and history.
NEWS
January 18, 2008
RICHARD KNERR, 82 Founder of Wham-O Richard Knerr, co-founder of the toy company that popularized the Hula Hoop, Frisbee and other fads that became classics, has died. He was 82. Mr. Knerr, who started Wham-O in 1948 with childhood friend Arthur "Spud" Melin, died Monday at a hospital after suffering a stroke earlier in the day at his Arcadia, Calif., home, his wife, Dorothy, told the Los Angeles Times. Mr. Knerr and Mr. Melin got their start in business peddling slingshots. They named their enterprise Wham-O.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | January 15, 2008
About two dozen women and men trooped into a Charles Village church on a recent afternoon to slough off winter pounds and become more in touch with their bodies. They did not use complicated exercise machines or torturous-looking Pilates devices, but something far more friendly and familiar: the hula hoop. "I hate the thought of going to the gym, but pick up a hoop and it can be playtime," said Noelle Powers, 30, who is teaching the six-week course. "It's a great way to burn calories and strengthen muscles, especially core muscles, and it can be very meditative."
NEWS
November 26, 2006
The Blue Cow Cafe, 5134 Thunder Hill Road, will offer a "Make Your Own Hoop Workshop," from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. and from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. today. Participants will learn to decorate and use the hoops. Blank hoops and the tape to decorate them will be supplied. Karen Blue, owner of the Blue Cow who describes herself as a "moola-hoop maker," will teach the workshop. The hoops are sturdy and can be recycled into newer versions. "When they start getting worn, you can retape them and it becomes like a nice old pair of jeans," Blue said.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2006
A kid excited about cauliflower? Doesn't sound likely. But Samantha McIntire, 8, certainly was exuberant last week as she shouted out the name of the cruciferous veggie. Samantha and about 20 other fellow day-campers at Davidsonville Elementary School were participating in "Food Fuels Fun," a program sponsored by the Anne Arundel County Department of Health. It's part of a larger "Learning to Live" program, which sends six peer educators around the county to teach children the importance of eating healthy, exercising and wearing sunscreen.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2006
A kid excited about cauliflower? Doesn't sound likely. But Samantha McIntire, 8, certainly was exuberant last week as she shouted out the name of the cruciferous veggie. Samantha and about 20 other fellow day-campers at Davidsonville Elementary School were participating in "Food Fuels Fun," a program sponsored by the Anne Arundel County Department of Health. It's part of a larger "Learning to Live" program, which sends six peer educators around the county to teach children the importance of eating healthy, exercising and wearing sunscreen.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2002
Humans, young and old, are not the only species that get bored with their toys. So do animals - and veterinary experts say that is unhealthy. This week, about 25 staffers at the National Aquarium took up power drills, handsaws, PVC pipes and an assortment of hardware to build new toys. Staffers strung together a rope ladder for South American monkeys, chained together Hula-Hoops for bottlenose dolphins and hacked PVC pipes into shapes that will challenge the eight arms of the giant Pacific octopus.
NEWS
July 1, 2002
Robert L.J. Long, 82, who was the Hawaii-based commander in chief of all U.S. military forces in the Pacific for four years, died Thursday in Honolulu. Admiral Long, a resident of Annapolis, died at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda. Admiral Long headed the Pacific Command from October 1979 until his retirement in July 1983. A native of Kansas City, Mo., he graduated from the Naval Academy in 1943. He earned the Bronze Star while serving aboard the battleship USS Colorado in the western Pacific during World War II. He later attended submarine school and commanded several submarines before joining the staff of Adm. Hyman Rickover in 1959.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.