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By Los Angeles Daily News | April 12, 1992
WAIKIKI, Hawaii -- Serious students of hula have a choice of 30 or so hula schools on the island of Oahu. But would-be hula girls and boys who are short on time head over to the Royal Hawaiian Shopping Center, where Lee Pua-Keala Mann teaches novices to express concepts like "beach boy sweet" and "little grass shack" with a mere twitch of the hip or a sweep of the arm.The mall's Orchid Court is packed on a recent Monday morning with tourists who form nice,...
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 14, 2014
More than 55 years after it became a national craze, the Harford County Public Library is giving residents an opportunity to show off their Hula Hoop skills at the Hoopla Hoop Contest Tuesday, July 15, at the Abingdon Library. Hoopla Hoop will be presented by MidWest Tape, the library's provider of Hoopla digital media. A representative of the company will be on hand to run the contest and award the winner with a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3. "Summer fun at the Library will take on a whole new meaning as young and old Hoopla Hoop at the Abingdon Library," Library Marketing Manager Janine Lis said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
In the basement of Les and Kas Nakamura's home, Laka the hula goddess presides.Represented by a block of softwood wrapped in yellow tapa VTC cloth, Laka sits on her altar next to the wooden figure of Lono the god of life and a bunch of ilima flowers, three conch shells and an unopened bottle of 86-proof Hawaiian whiskey.Nobody drinks the booze, and "we do not pray to the hula goddess," said Ms. Nakamura. Her hula school, Hawaii Aloha Luau Services in Pasadena, doesn't endorse drinking or any religion.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
The Thanksgiving meal waiting inside was warm and rich, but the scores of people standing in line outside at the Virginia S. Baker Recreation Center on Thursday morning looked somber as the cold wind whipped past them. But just after 10 a.m., a tiny woman in a leopard-print jacket and purple and black leotard showed up and began building an aerial rig resembling a giant swing set rising 22 feet into the sky in nearby Patterson Park. A group of friends — some buskers, some clowns, also dressed frivolously in tutus or cowboy vests — took to stilts or grabbed a hula hoop and began twirling.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2004
When a job transfer took Kas Nakamura to Hawaii, she never imagined that 30 years later she would still be so connected to the islands. But the culture, the people and especially the dance, took root. Now, as a hula instructor, the Pasadena resident helps others discover the dance and, in essence, the culture of Hawaii. Although the flowing movements of hula can appear simple, it is more complicated than it looks and offers a steady workout for all ages and fitness levels. M-tItM-Fs an exercise of the body, but also the mind,M-v says Nakamura, 59. Nakamura teaches class several times a week, both at her home studio and at area senior centers.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | September 3, 1995
Rhythms of Hawaii have home in PasadenaWhen Kas Keolapua Nakamura's hula school went to the World Hula competition in Honolulu, the announcer introduced them as being "from Pasadena, Md. -- of all places."Yet, Mrs. Nakamura's students have competed in elite competitions all over Hawaii, where hula is regarded as a sport, a performing art and a way to preserve local history.A Baltimore native, Mrs. Nakamura, 50, learned hula while stationed at Pearl Harbor Naval Base when she was 28. After taking lessons for several years, she competed in Hilo's Merrie Monarch Festival, the Olympics of hula dancing.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
Larry McCormick, 71, a longtime Los Angeles news anchor and public affairs host who was one of the city's first black TV news anchormen, died in that city Friday after a long illness. A fixture at television station KTLA since 1971, when he started as a weathercaster, Mr. McCormick filled a variety of on-air roles over the years, including delivering sports news and health and fitness reports. Born in Kansas City, Mo., Mr. McCormick studied theater at what is now the University of Missouri in Kansas City but changed his major to broadcasting.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
Sharon Mech has found paradise in Katherine Nakamura's basement in Pasadena, where she learned the hula and other Polynesian dance forms. The 48-year-old court reporter from Severna Park says the dances help her to relax."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
Pasadena goes tropical this weekend with Hawaiian steel guitarist Henry Allen strumming in concert at St. Jane Francis Church hall.Two local dance groups, Baltimore's Magic of Hawaii and the Hawai'i Aloha Lu'au Dancers of Pasadena, will join Allen tomorrow in a four-hour celebration of Hawaiian culture and entertainment."
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
The Thanksgiving meal waiting inside was warm and rich, but the scores of people standing in line outside at the Virginia S. Baker Recreation Center on Thursday morning looked somber as the cold wind whipped past them. But just after 10 a.m., a tiny woman in a leopard-print jacket and purple and black leotard showed up and began building an aerial rig resembling a giant swing set rising 22 feet into the sky in nearby Patterson Park. A group of friends — some buskers, some clowns, also dressed frivolously in tutus or cowboy vests — took to stilts or grabbed a hula hoop and began twirling.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
The Annapolis-area residents sing, dance and chant with near-flawless rhythm and cadence, displaying traditions and cultures from America's only island state. They are members of one of the hula classes for adults offered at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts through mid-August, and they serve notice that the Hawaiian dance is more than swiveling hips in grass skirts. "There are a lot of misconceptions on the mainland about what real hula is," said class instructor Julia Gibb, an Annapolis resident of Portuguese and Ukrainian descent whose grandmother and mother were born in Hawaii.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
At age 8, Mahal Maria May started dance class and quickly made it as much a part of her education as the ABCs. She concentrated on Hawaiian routines and has spent decades mastering the nuances of the dance forever associated with America's island state. She often performs in traditional grass skirt before an audience or at a family luau. "I love the hula," said May, whose first name translates to "love" in her native Filipino. "It tells a lovely story in a feminine way. " Now, at 65, she is the reigning Ms. Maryland Senior America and is practicing her signature dance for the national pageant in October in Atlantic City, N.J. May, a retired education consultant for the federal government and a Davidsonville resident, is used to performing as a member of the South County Showstoppers, a traveling troupe of seniors.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 6, 2011
David Giegerich, an award-winning musician and a nationally known dobro and steel guitarist who was a co-founder of the Hula Monsters, a Hawaiian swing and country combo, died Dec. 29 of aplastic anemia at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 57. "Dave was always playful and joyous with his music. He had a wonderful ear for melody and harmony and a great sense of rhythm and time," said Tom Mitchell, a guitarist and a co-founder in 1988 with Mr. Giegerich and Moe Nelson of the Hula Monsters, whose musical repertoire included swing, Hawaiian and American roots music.
NEWS
August 14, 2010
Singles social group The Phoenix Cultural Singles Group, a Columbia social group for those 50 and older, meets from 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Sundays at the Oakland Mills Interfaith Center, 5885 Robert Oliver Place in the Oakland Mills Village Center. Coffee, tea and a light snack are served. The group plans events and trips. Information: 410-997-0739. Around town Single Again Changing Focus Single Again, a nonprofit program for adults who are separated, widowed or in the process of divorce, provides weekly presentations and small-group discussions in a confidential, comfortable atmosphere.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | June 5, 2007
You've heard of banjo hitters. Well, for a day, the Philadelphia Phillies' Shane Victorino was a ukulele slugger. Victorino, nicknamed the Flyin' Hawaiian, hit a walk-off home run to beat the San Francisco Giants, 9-8, on Sunday, which also happened to be his own dashboard figurine day. You have to hand it to Victorino. On a day when the Phillies participated in a campy promotion that included playing Don Ho's "Tiny Bubbles" when the right fielder batted and hula dancers swaying on the dugout, the guy managed to bring some dignity to the whole episode.
NEWS
November 26, 2006
The Blue Cow Cafe, 5134 Thunder Hill Road, will offer a "Make Your Own Hoop Workshop," from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. and from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. today. Participants will learn to decorate and use the hoops. Blank hoops and the tape to decorate them will be supplied. Karen Blue, owner of the Blue Cow who describes herself as a "moola-hoop maker," will teach the workshop. The hoops are sturdy and can be recycled into newer versions. "When they start getting worn, you can retape them and it becomes like a nice old pair of jeans," Blue said.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | June 5, 2007
You've heard of banjo hitters. Well, for a day, the Philadelphia Phillies' Shane Victorino was a ukulele slugger. Victorino, nicknamed the Flyin' Hawaiian, hit a walk-off home run to beat the San Francisco Giants, 9-8, on Sunday, which also happened to be his own dashboard figurine day. You have to hand it to Victorino. On a day when the Phillies participated in a campy promotion that included playing Don Ho's "Tiny Bubbles" when the right fielder batted and hula dancers swaying on the dugout, the guy managed to bring some dignity to the whole episode.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE Title: "Oleander, Jacaranda: A Childhood Perceived" Author: Penelope Lively Publisher: HarperCollins Length, price: 160 pages, $20 and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE Title: "Oleander, Jacaranda: A Childhood Perceived" Author: Penelope Lively Publisher: HarperCollins Length, price: 160 pages, $20,LOS ANGELES TIMES Title: "Dead Men's Heart" Author: Aaron Elkins Publisher: Mysterious Press Length, price: 227 pages, $18.95 | May 1, 1994
Title: "Hula"Author: Lisa SheaPublisher: W. W. NortonLength, price: 155 pages, $15 This small, splendidly self-assured first novel tells the story of two summers in a young girl's life, capturing a slice of childhood in a keen and unsentimental fashion. The nameless narrator is 9 years old when the book begins. She spends the long, hot days with her older sister; but even their most innocent games somehow take on a darker dimension.Favorite pastimes, such as donning grass skirts and dancing the hula, can only be done in secret, lest they attract the attention of their disapproving father.
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