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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 7, 2001
The Hughes brothers, Bryan (145 pounds) and Tony (152), and teammate J. C. Cropf (125) all won titles to lead 13th-ranked Fallston past 12th-ranked Loyola last night in the 12-team Garry Trott Invitational Tournament at Fallston. Tony Hughes (15-0) bear-hugged Eastern Tech's Randy Roberts straight to his back for a 31-second fall, his 11th this year. For Loyola, Brendan Boyle (119), Danny Natterman (135), Mike Waldron (160), Anthony Filletti (171) and Colin Doyle (215) all won titles. Natterman (15-0)
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By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | January 15, 2010
I used to think the apocalypse was so "tomorrow." Lately at the movies, though, what with "Zombieland" and "2012" and "The Road" and "Daybreakers," the end of the world seems so yesterday. Another day, another sky full of ash. Another ribbon of highway littered with charred vehicles and human remains. While we're on the subject: Why doesn't the apocalypse ever figure into a film like "Leap Year" or "Did You Hear About the Morgans?" Where it could really do some narrative good ?
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FEATURES
By Phillip O'Connor and Phillip O'Connor,McClatchy-Tribune | January 1, 2007
VERSAILLES, Mo. -- The Hughes brothers admit they conned a few people back in the day. From mobsters to bartenders to the Army, they told stories a bit short of the truth in return for quick cash, another free pour or to hide from the law. This time, the brothers insist, they're not lying. Sit a while and listen to them reminisce and you begin to wonder whether the tales they spin could possibly be fact. A wrongful imprisonment, a jailbreak, years on the lam. Correspondence with a U.S. president, cooperation in a corruption investigation, consorts with topless dancers.
FEATURES
By Phillip O'Connor and Phillip O'Connor,McClatchy-Tribune | January 1, 2007
VERSAILLES, Mo. -- The Hughes brothers admit they conned a few people back in the day. From mobsters to bartenders to the Army, they told stories a bit short of the truth in return for quick cash, another free pour or to hide from the law. This time, the brothers insist, they're not lying. Sit a while and listen to them reminisce and you begin to wonder whether the tales they spin could possibly be fact. A wrongful imprisonment, a jailbreak, years on the lam. Correspondence with a U.S. president, cooperation in a corruption investigation, consorts with topless dancers.
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | June 24, 1993
"Menace II Society,'' the superb debut movie by novice directors Albert and Allen Hughes, is no ''Boyz N The Hood.'' Comparisons to the 1990 film directed by John Singleton have been made, but are misguided.''Boyz N The Hood'' received considerable acclaim, much of it from well-meaning whites, who, I suggest, may not have known any better. Mr. Singleton's film was at times puerile, preachy and ultimately annoying. The sexism of its leading male characters was treated as trite and cute. In ''Menace II Society,'' such attitudes are portrayed as self-destructive and deadly.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 19, 2001
All who are applauding the Jack the Ripper film From Hell as a visionary sort of horror movie should ponder three words: Bram Stoker's Dracula. Francis Ford Coppola's bombastic 1992 vampire movie also won some great reviews and did flash business before word spread that it choked on its own showy excesses of camerawork and set design. From Hell has the buzz that comes from being based on a superb comic-book-turned-graphic-novel by Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell. But the movie, oddly enough, is like a comic book of a comic book.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 4, 1995
If style were substance, "Dead Presidents" would be Immanuel Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason."But style is only style, and so "Dead Presidents" is a slick, beautiful, engrossing but largely empty exercise in pyrotechnics and attitude. No one can doubt that the very young Hughes Brothers, who astounded the world with "Menace II Society," know where to put the camera. Possibly, however, they need to think through their materials a bit.The film is loosely derived from a story told by Wallace Terry in his oral history of black soldiers in Vietnam, "Bloods."
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | January 15, 2010
I used to think the apocalypse was so "tomorrow." Lately at the movies, though, what with "Zombieland" and "2012" and "The Road" and "Daybreakers," the end of the world seems so yesterday. Another day, another sky full of ash. Another ribbon of highway littered with charred vehicles and human remains. While we're on the subject: Why doesn't the apocalypse ever figure into a film like "Leap Year" or "Did You Hear About the Morgans?" Where it could really do some narrative good ?
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1997
Police have linked two of four Washington-area men charged in a federal drug case to the shooting and stalking of a Maryland state trooper last year in Abingdon, which may have been retaliation for drug seizures by the officer or his brother, also a state trooper, according to a court document.The wounded officer, Trooper Michael T. Hughes, was shot in the arm Aug. 27 during an apparent ambush near his home on Long Bar Harbor Road in Harford County. A man stepped from behind a tree and fired several times with a handgun.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 4, 1995
Allen works with the actors. Albert works behind the camera.But Allen has opinions on the camera and Albert has opinions on the actors, and both have opinions on the script.Do they fight?"All the time," says Chris Tucker, one of the co-stars of "Dead Presidents." "About everything."And so it is, somehow, that Allen and Albert Hughes, brothers and twins, get their films made, squabbling all the time, falling over each other and into each other's faces."We really fought over wardrobe," says Allen.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 19, 2001
All who are applauding the Jack the Ripper film From Hell as a visionary sort of horror movie should ponder three words: Bram Stoker's Dracula. Francis Ford Coppola's bombastic 1992 vampire movie also won some great reviews and did flash business before word spread that it choked on its own showy excesses of camerawork and set design. From Hell has the buzz that comes from being based on a superb comic-book-turned-graphic-novel by Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell. But the movie, oddly enough, is like a comic book of a comic book.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 7, 2001
The Hughes brothers, Bryan (145 pounds) and Tony (152), and teammate J. C. Cropf (125) all won titles to lead 13th-ranked Fallston past 12th-ranked Loyola last night in the 12-team Garry Trott Invitational Tournament at Fallston. Tony Hughes (15-0) bear-hugged Eastern Tech's Randy Roberts straight to his back for a 31-second fall, his 11th this year. For Loyola, Brendan Boyle (119), Danny Natterman (135), Mike Waldron (160), Anthony Filletti (171) and Colin Doyle (215) all won titles. Natterman (15-0)
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1997
Police have linked two of four Washington-area men charged in a federal drug case to the shooting and stalking of a Maryland state trooper last year in Abingdon, which may have been retaliation for drug seizures by the officer or his brother, also a state trooper, according to a court document.The wounded officer, Trooper Michael T. Hughes, was shot in the arm Aug. 27 during an apparent ambush near his home on Long Bar Harbor Road in Harford County. A man stepped from behind a tree and fired several times with a handgun.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 4, 1995
If style were substance, "Dead Presidents" would be Immanuel Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason."But style is only style, and so "Dead Presidents" is a slick, beautiful, engrossing but largely empty exercise in pyrotechnics and attitude. No one can doubt that the very young Hughes Brothers, who astounded the world with "Menace II Society," know where to put the camera. Possibly, however, they need to think through their materials a bit.The film is loosely derived from a story told by Wallace Terry in his oral history of black soldiers in Vietnam, "Bloods."
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | June 24, 1993
"Menace II Society,'' the superb debut movie by novice directors Albert and Allen Hughes, is no ''Boyz N The Hood.'' Comparisons to the 1990 film directed by John Singleton have been made, but are misguided.''Boyz N The Hood'' received considerable acclaim, much of it from well-meaning whites, who, I suggest, may not have known any better. Mr. Singleton's film was at times puerile, preachy and ultimately annoying. The sexism of its leading male characters was treated as trite and cute. In ''Menace II Society,'' such attitudes are portrayed as self-destructive and deadly.
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