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June 9, 2008
// House (Hugh Laurie) is seeing his ex-fellows in places where they shouldn't be on House (9 p.m., WBFF-45).
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
If it worked, Monsters vs. Aliens would be the movie equivalent of a novelty song like "The Purple People Eater" - a frolic that lodges in your brain and lightens your load for an entire season. But it's mostly just a giddy, gaudy shambles. This ragtag tale of a group of Earth monsters unleashed on the evil alien Gallaxhar (Rainn Wilson) will pop your eyes without tickling your funny bone. It might have sounded hilarious as a pitch. What could be more surefire for a 3-D animated romp than assembling slapstick versions of the 50-Foot Woman, the Fly (here, "Dr. Cockroach")
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 11, 2008
Street Kings is like a sideshow shooting gallery that wants to award you a Ph.D. in sociology instead of a stuffed toy or 10 free shots. It would be easier to take as gory, lowdown fun if it weren't giving you the third degree in more ways than one. But it may be the first effective audience-participation film of 2008. See it with people who take it for the trash it is, and you can cheer the baroque killings and laugh fondly with Forest Whitaker as he tries too hard to create a domestic sociopath to match his role as Idi Amin.
NEWS
September 13, 2008
The pile of dough 'House' builds to be bigger for actor Hugh Laurie Hugh Laurie will reportedly become one of TV's highest-paid stars under the terms of a new deal with Universal Media Studios. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Laurie's pact will keep him with his hit Fox drama House through the 2011-2012 season. The trade paper says Laurie's new salary will be roughly $400,000 per episode, or more than $9 million a season. Laurie, whose original House salary was only in the mid-five-figure range, might also get a producing credit of some sort.
NEWS
September 13, 2008
The pile of dough 'House' builds to be bigger for actor Hugh Laurie Hugh Laurie will reportedly become one of TV's highest-paid stars under the terms of a new deal with Universal Media Studios. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Laurie's pact will keep him with his hit Fox drama House through the 2011-2012 season. The trade paper says Laurie's new salary will be roughly $400,000 per episode, or more than $9 million a season. Laurie, whose original House salary was only in the mid-five-figure range, might also get a producing credit of some sort.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 17, 1999
"Stuart Little" the movie is less a literary adaptation than a licensing agreement come to computer-generated life.As a sop to contemporary youngsters with their famously brief attention spans and insatiable hunger for ever-accelerating action, the filmmakers of "Stuart Little" have taken E. B. White's original character -- a lovable white mouse who finds himself a member of a human family -- and put him into all sorts of situations that the author would never have dreamed of.Old fogies who were raised on the original book will no doubt dislike the changes, although the audience for which "Stuart Little" is intended will find little to complain about.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
If it worked, Monsters vs. Aliens would be the movie equivalent of a novelty song like "The Purple People Eater" - a frolic that lodges in your brain and lightens your load for an entire season. But it's mostly just a giddy, gaudy shambles. This ragtag tale of a group of Earth monsters unleashed on the evil alien Gallaxhar (Rainn Wilson) will pop your eyes without tickling your funny bone. It might have sounded hilarious as a pitch. What could be more surefire for a 3-D animated romp than assembling slapstick versions of the 50-Foot Woman, the Fly (here, "Dr. Cockroach")
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 9, 1990
The wit of P.G. Wodehouse, at once elegant and farcical, is on display for five weeks as PBS' Masterpiece Theater presents "Jeeves and Wooster" beginning Sunday night at 9 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67.Bertie Wooster is a member of the idle upper class, young, wealthy and undirected. Jeeves is his valet.When you first meet Wooster, he is trying unsuccessfully to regain his equilibrium after a night of drink.Jeeves, answering an advertisement, comes to the door, mixes a special concoction that instantly cures the hangover and straightens out the chaotic flat in seconds.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | May 2, 2006
So why has House, Fox's medical procedural, become the hottest show on television? Twenty-five million people tuned in to last week's episode, a high-water mark that will almost certainly be trumped tonight at 9, when the first of the two-part "Euphoria" airs. (Tomorrow's conclusion, with a guest turn by Charles Dutton, airs at 8 p.m.) There's a mystery here, people, and we intend to crack it after the last commercial break ... er, by the last graph. Let's begin with the obvious, and that's American Idol, which has fed a sea of humanity into House since January.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 16, 2004
Dr. Gregory House doesn't wear a white lab coat, and he will do almost anything to avoid actually having to see a patient. He doesn't trust their testimony on ailments, and besides, listening to people who say they're sick keeps him from the only two things in life that he seems to truly enjoy: watching General Hospital and popping painkillers like they are M&Ms. We've come a long way from Dr. Marcus Welby, M.D., in the last 30 years of prime-time television. And the surly doctor in this House, premiering tonight on Fox, seems to have been born out of all the frustration felt these days toward a health care system that often seems more geared toward making money than healing the sick.
FEATURES
June 9, 2008
// House (Hugh Laurie) is seeing his ex-fellows in places where they shouldn't be on House (9 p.m., WBFF-45).
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 11, 2008
Street Kings is like a sideshow shooting gallery that wants to award you a Ph.D. in sociology instead of a stuffed toy or 10 free shots. It would be easier to take as gory, lowdown fun if it weren't giving you the third degree in more ways than one. But it may be the first effective audience-participation film of 2008. See it with people who take it for the trash it is, and you can cheer the baroque killings and laugh fondly with Forest Whitaker as he tries too hard to create a domestic sociopath to match his role as Idi Amin.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | May 2, 2006
So why has House, Fox's medical procedural, become the hottest show on television? Twenty-five million people tuned in to last week's episode, a high-water mark that will almost certainly be trumped tonight at 9, when the first of the two-part "Euphoria" airs. (Tomorrow's conclusion, with a guest turn by Charles Dutton, airs at 8 p.m.) There's a mystery here, people, and we intend to crack it after the last commercial break ... er, by the last graph. Let's begin with the obvious, and that's American Idol, which has fed a sea of humanity into House since January.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 9, 2005
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - Hugh Laurie is having these moments that would appall Dr. Gregory House. In collecting an award for playing House, a brilliant but cold physician, British actor Laurie shares a personal story. "The last time I won an award for acting, my parents were in the audience," he says. "I had to turn around, and I saw their faces as my name was read out. And they smiled at each other, a smile of pride. And that has stayed with me, because to be honest, I didn't give my parents a lot of reasons to be proud.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 16, 2004
Dr. Gregory House doesn't wear a white lab coat, and he will do almost anything to avoid actually having to see a patient. He doesn't trust their testimony on ailments, and besides, listening to people who say they're sick keeps him from the only two things in life that he seems to truly enjoy: watching General Hospital and popping painkillers like they are M&Ms. We've come a long way from Dr. Marcus Welby, M.D., in the last 30 years of prime-time television. And the surly doctor in this House, premiering tonight on Fox, seems to have been born out of all the frustration felt these days toward a health care system that often seems more geared toward making money than healing the sick.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 17, 1999
"Stuart Little" the movie is less a literary adaptation than a licensing agreement come to computer-generated life.As a sop to contemporary youngsters with their famously brief attention spans and insatiable hunger for ever-accelerating action, the filmmakers of "Stuart Little" have taken E. B. White's original character -- a lovable white mouse who finds himself a member of a human family -- and put him into all sorts of situations that the author would never have dreamed of.Old fogies who were raised on the original book will no doubt dislike the changes, although the audience for which "Stuart Little" is intended will find little to complain about.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 9, 2005
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - Hugh Laurie is having these moments that would appall Dr. Gregory House. In collecting an award for playing House, a brilliant but cold physician, British actor Laurie shares a personal story. "The last time I won an award for acting, my parents were in the audience," he says. "I had to turn around, and I saw their faces as my name was read out. And they smiled at each other, a smile of pride. And that has stayed with me, because to be honest, I didn't give my parents a lot of reasons to be proud.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 9, 1990
The wit of P.G. Wodehouse, at once elegant and farcical, is on display for five weeks as PBS' Masterpiece Theater presents "Jeeves and Wooster" beginning Sunday night at 9 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67.Bertie Wooster is a member of the idle upper class, young, wealthy and undirected. Jeeves is his valet.When you first meet Wooster, he is trying unsuccessfully to regain his equilibrium after a night of drink.Jeeves, answering an advertisement, comes to the door, mixes a special concoction that instantly cures the hangover and straightens out the chaotic flat in seconds.
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