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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | July 10, 1995
The late-night ratings race should be an easy win for "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" tonight. English actor Hugh Grant is scheduled to make his first televised appearance since his arrest last month with a Los Angeles prostitute.* "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Grace (Madeline Zima) invites the president for a visit but gets brother Roger Clinton instead, in this repeat. Meanwhile Fran (Fran Drescher) tries to help Maxwell (Charles Shaughnessy) land the rights to a play.
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By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | May 8, 2008
Thirteen years have passed since Colin Firth became, as Jane Austen might put it, "universally acknowledged" as the definitive Mr. Darcy in the lionized BBC TV miniseries of Austen's Pride and Prejudice. In the intervening time, the 47-year-old actor has established himself among worldwide audiences as a go-to guy when it comes to British romantic leads not played by Hugh Grant -- who was, you'll recall, Firth's rival in 2001's Bridget Jones's Diary. Firth describes Then She Found Me, which opens tomorrow, as straddling the edge of both his "serious" and "comedic" projects.
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By MIKE ROYKO | July 17, 1995
In a recent scholarly lecture, Dr. I.M. Kookie, the noted expert on lots of stuff, presented a unique perspective on the unfortunate Hugh Grant affair."
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By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media News | May 7, 2007
I like American TV reality programming - the worse the better. I love seeing people humiliated, made fun of, brought down," said Hugh Grant. That was just about the time he was throwing baked beans at a paparazzo. Let's consider our British cousins for a moment. Queen Elizabeth II is now making her royal progress in the United States. Her grandsons are geared up for their big July blowout concert to salute the 10th anniversary of their mother's untimely death. And their father, Prince Charles, and his newish wife, Camilla, have decided they won't horn in on the Diana magic.
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By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media News | May 7, 2007
I like American TV reality programming - the worse the better. I love seeing people humiliated, made fun of, brought down," said Hugh Grant. That was just about the time he was throwing baked beans at a paparazzo. Let's consider our British cousins for a moment. Queen Elizabeth II is now making her royal progress in the United States. Her grandsons are geared up for their big July blowout concert to salute the 10th anniversary of their mother's untimely death. And their father, Prince Charles, and his newish wife, Camilla, have decided they won't horn in on the Diana magic.
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By Dave Larsen and Dave Larsen,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
Hugh Grant is a naughty hair-puller.This comes from the lips of Grant's staggeringly gorgeous girlfriend, actress and model Elizabeth Hurley, who is producer of Grant's latest film, "Extreme Measures," which opens Friday. The medical thriller is the first feature from Simian Films, a development company founded by Grant and Hurley in partnership with Castle Rock Entertainment.It should be noted, however, that Hurley also twirls her luminous brown locks around her fingers as she talks. But not nearly so much as Grant, who at one point in our conversation absent-mindedly pulls his hair through the fingers of one hand and curls the thick strands around the fingers of the other.
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By Jeanne Cooper and Jeanne Cooper,Boston Globe | July 9, 1995
Hugh Grant's on the cover of People (July 13), blessedly not in the infamous mug shot, but it's ironically the July issue of Vogue, published well before the English actor's arrest on charges of lewd conduct, that gives the most insight into why he was caught indulging in auto eroticism.In Candace Bushnell's profile, titled "Rake's Progress," the interviewer is amused but never fully taken in by the --ing, self-deprecating, deliberately "naughty" actor. The ironies, of course, don't end with the headline.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 14, 2007
Hugh Grant, that prince of erotic dither, and Drew Barrymore, that queen of sweetly amorous emotion, generate a rare flirtatious zing in Music and Lyrics, an affable farce about a worn-out '80s singer-composer named Alex Fletcher (Grant) from a band called PoP! Barrymore plays Sophie Fisher, a former writing student who comes to his Upper West Side New York apartment to water his plants and ends up nurturing his creativity and finding her life's work as a lyricist. This movie doesn't pretend to be anything more than a cheerful night out, and on that count it scores: It will set a happy mood for couples and a lot of singles, too. PoP!
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 17, 2002
Let other critics complain about cookie-cutter crowd-pleasers with tormented adolescents battling super-villains and yearning for unreachable damsels in distress. What about the shared banalities of this season's "human" critical favorites? Join two antithetical characters by accident, leap continually between them, fuel their antagonism to flashpoint, bond them indelibly in an upbeat finish - and you have the urban thriller Changing Lanes as well as today's delayed-coming-of-age comedy, About a Boy. In what may be a key theme for 2002, both depict hollow city slickers finding their soul when they help psychologically damaged strangers.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 20, 1999
Michael Felgate has a problem. The soft-spoken manager of a classy New York auction house is in love with a gorgeous schoolteacher, who happens to be the daughter of a mid-level mob boss.But Michael's problem isn't the mob. Michael's problem is that he's in a movie that's been done before -- and much more effectively -- in "Analyze This." Like that earlier comedy, "Mickey Blue Eyes" is a fish-out-of-water comedy that gets most of its laughs by caricaturing the Mafia dramas of Scorsese and Coppola.
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By Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach and Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critics | February 16, 2007
Capsules by film critics Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Because I Said So -- Diane Keaton is a mother who can't bear the thought of her lovelorn daughter (Mandy Moore) spending one more minute unattached. This is a relationship film put together by people who think TV sitcoms are reality shows. Granted, some truths about mother-daughter love get touched. But those are hardly worth all the waste and banality leading up to them.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 14, 2007
Hugh Grant, that prince of erotic dither, and Drew Barrymore, that queen of sweetly amorous emotion, generate a rare flirtatious zing in Music and Lyrics, an affable farce about a worn-out '80s singer-composer named Alex Fletcher (Grant) from a band called PoP! Barrymore plays Sophie Fisher, a former writing student who comes to his Upper West Side New York apartment to water his plants and ends up nurturing his creativity and finding her life's work as a lyricist. This movie doesn't pretend to be anything more than a cheerful night out, and on that count it scores: It will set a happy mood for couples and a lot of singles, too. PoP!
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 21, 2006
Events have thoroughly outstripped the would-be outrageous new burlesque of politics and show biz, American Dreamz, in which a dunderheaded president (Dennis Quaid) wakes up after his re-election, decides to read a newspaper and gets so depressed that he doesn't leave his bedroom for three weeks. It's mildly amusing to see his chief of staff (Willem Dafoe), a lean and hungry version of Dick Cheney, dictating whatever his boss should say via a cuff-link transmitter to an earpiece. But what's supposed to lift the movie beyond banal parody to wild satire is the chief of staff's attempt to raise the president's sagging poll numbers.
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By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 21, 2006
Let's straighten a few things out, right up front, Mandy Moore - no relation - says. She did not, as was reported many places, kick her parents, Stacy and Don, out of her house in Los Angeles. "My parents were very upset," she says with an exasperated laugh. "I am very close with my family, and when I bought my house in L.A. three years ago, I wanted them to come live with me. But as I got close to 21, I realized I needed my space. So my parents just moved back to Orlando, [Fla.]. Nobody was thrown out of anywhere!"
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By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2004
Christmas is ruined: Hugh Grant says he's given up on acting. Every holiday season, it seems, he reliably resurfaces in another harmless film, playing some variation of a powerful or rich Brit - one with a hard exterior that masks a soft, gooey heart of gold - who falls for the hired help. But the perpetually befuddled actor with the floppy hair and the charming accent told a British newspaper recently that he is "semiretired" and that he finds acting to be "a miserable experience." "It's so long and boring and so difficult to get it right," he told the Evening Standard.
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By Christopher Kelly and Christopher Kelly,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 30, 2003
The holiday movie season is once again upon us -- and this year, the choices are particularly difficult to make. So many felons to see, so little time. There's a family movie starring the guy who was once pulled over while in the company of a transsexual prostitute. But maybe you'd rather see the horror movie starring the woman who once crashed into another woman's car, then sped away from the scene. Or maybe the romantic comedy with the Brit who was once arrested for soliciting a hooker in Los Angeles?
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By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 28, 1999
"Notting Hill" is being billed as a conventional love story between characters played by Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant, but it's really a triangle consisting of Grant, Roberts and the camera that continually beckons and seduces her.The relationship between Roberts and the camera is extraordinarily potent, and their love affair provides a super-charged undercurrent altogether appropriate to the context of stardom and the wages of fame in "Notting Hill." From the very first sequence, a series of staged and real-life paparazzi shots of Roberts in recent years, it's clear the camera, as surrogate for the star's millions of admirers, will give any human suitor a run for his money.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 13, 1995
"Sense and Sensibility" is a comedy of manners, but nobody ever said they had to be good manners.In fact, in its sedate and witty way, it chronicles bad behavior of the most malicious sort, seeing in society an arena where the contests are as brutal as any in nature, and possibly more so because they are waged with crooked pinky or uplifted eyebrow against a backdrop of crinkling silks and sputtering candles.Derived from Jane Austen's 1811 novel by one of its own stars (Emma Thompson, who may get an Oscar nomination for both acting and writing)
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November 20, 2003
"I saw this slightly overweight, unhappy looking, middle-aged man dancing completely out of time, and I will never ever dance again as long as I live." -- Hugh Grant, on his solo dance scene in Love Actually, from Associated Press Radio.
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By Rob Lowman and Rob Lowman,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | May 8, 2003
It was inevitable that the reigning king and queen of romantic comedies -- Hugh Grant and Sandra Bullock -- would finally meet up. Two Weeks Notice, out Tuesday on DVD, finds the pair at their best. Neither of them breaks new ground in the film by writer-director Marc Lawrence, but both play to their strengths. Bullock's Lucy Kelson is an Ivy League-educated lawyer based in Brooklyn who works for environmental causes. Hugh Grant's George Wade is the glamorous front for his brother Howard's real-estate empire.
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