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By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | January 27, 2010
Great Oak Lending Partners, a Timonium broker, is being fined $11,000 for what U.S. officials describe as misleading advertising about Federal Housing Administration mortgages. The Department of Housing and Urban Development, which oversees FHA, said this week that its mortgagee review board found several problems with Great Oak Lending's direct-mail ads. In addition to the fine, the company will have to forward its advertising to the FHA for monthly reviews during a six-month probation, HUD said.
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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Edwin "Ted" William Baker, one of Columbia's original planners and a world traveler whose pursuits included rough-terrain horseback riding, died of a cardiac arrest Tuesday. The Baltimore resident was 77. Mr. Baker grew up in California and earned a bachelor's degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley in 1959. His two years in the Navy after graduation fueled a lasting love of visiting new places, said his daughter, Caroline S.A. Baker of Baltimore. "He traveled all over in those two years and wrote postcards from all different hemispheres — from Japan and Sydney, Australia, and off the coast of Africa," she said.
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NEWS
May 1, 1991
A long-running dispute between the city Housing Department and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development threatens to shut down the only area organization dedicated to encouraging minority business development in Baltimore.The subject of the dispute is the Council for Equal Business Opportunity, Inc., an independent, non-profit group created in 1967 to help minority-owned businesses secure commercial loans and to provide start-up capital for fledgling businesses through a revolving credit fund.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
City officials took the head of the nation's Department of Housing and Urban Development on a tour Wednesday of Barclay to show him work by a private developer they say is starting to turn around the small, impoverished neighborhood in the middle of the city. It's a story of a public-private partnership about to start a new chapter, now that the company is one of 11 developers slated to take over some of the city's public housing units. HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, in town to announce the award of $1.8 billion in capital funds for the nation's public housing, said he expects Baltimore to be a model for the new program, which is designed to allow deteriorating public units to access previously off-limits sources of money for repair.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
The number of renters experiencing “worst case” housing needs has increased by almost half since the beginning of the Great Recession, according to a just-released summary of a forthcoming report from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. In 2007, there were 5.9 million very low-income households that were designated as having worst-case needs, according to the summary. By 2011, 8.5 million households qualified as worst-case scenarios because their rent burdens were extreme - more than half of their income went to rent, HUD said.
NEWS
November 2, 1997
BALTIMOREANS should be relieved the Department of Housing and Urban Development has retroactively absolved city Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III of what appeared to be a clear conflict-of-interest violation. That Mr. Henson didn't consult HUD for a ruling until after the fact, however, is disturbing. It smacks of past criticism of the commissioner's shoot-first, ask-questions-later approach.A company owned by Mr. Henson's sister was subcontracted to do interior decorating in the Lafayette Courts housing development, despite HUD rules barring contracts between housing administrators and companies owned by themselves or members of their immediate family.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Same-sex couples are discriminated against when searching for housing in online rental markets across the country, according to a new U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development study released Tuesday. In states like Maryland where such discrimination is illegal, the discrimination is even more pronounced , the study noted. The HUD study, described by the federal agency as "the first-ever national study examining housing discrimination against same-sex couples in the private rental market," involved the authors sending 7,000 emails to housing providers, allegedly from prospective heterosexual and same-sex couples, and then comparing the responses received.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden, who was endorsed this week by the two activists leading the campaign against the federal Moving to Opportunity subsidized housing program, has charged that HUD Secretary Henry G. Cisneros is "playing politics" with the issue.Mr. Hayden said he had heard that his meeting with Mr. Cisneros to discuss the Moving to Opportunity program won't be scheduled until after the Nov. 8 election, a delay he said is deliberate "stalling."Mr. Hayden said he also still plans court action to block the program, although County Attorney Stanley S. Schapiro said he is not sure when that action will come.
NEWS
November 5, 1993
The decision by federal authorities to approve more heavily subsidized low-income housing in Edgewood flies in the face of Harford County's housing policy and the wishes of surrounding communities.But it does reflect the local need for rent-assistance housing and the desire to keep a mixed townhouse development from going belly up and boarded up. Without the conversion of 209 units to Section 8 rent subsidies, the managers of Meadowood Townhouses said they, and a number of their tenants, would face serious financial difficulties.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore's housing agency must pay a public housing resident $150,000 because the city failed to accommodate the woman's request to be moved, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Wednesday. It also must pay the resident's attorneys $10,000, increase exposure of its reasonable accommodation policies and procedures, train staff about those policies and "submit regular reports to HUD on its efforts to promptly respond to reasonable accommodation requests," HUD said in a statement.
NEWS
Bob Ehrlich | August 25, 2013
There are so many things to say with regard to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development's proposed rule entitled "Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing. " And since this proposal lands on the hot buttons of race and class, I'm going to ask all of you to take a deep breath, put aside your preconceptions about federal housing policy for a minute, and simply give some objective thought to the size and scope of this latest missive from Washington, D.C. First, it is worthwhile to revisit a historical fact: Discriminatory housing practices were predominant in this country for a very long time.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
Justice delayed is justice denied, so the legal maxim goes. Judgments delayed, however, can be downright expensive. Last week, the Housing Authority of Baltimore City announced that it had paid $6.8 million to satisfy outstanding court judgments that the agency had allowed six former tenants to become lead-poisoned while living in public housing as young children. Those checks, though, represented just the final installment in a series of payments made over the past 13 months to comply with the judgments, which were four to six years old. The total price tag was much higher.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore's housing agency must pay a public housing resident $150,000 because the city failed to accommodate the woman's request to be moved, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Wednesday. It also must pay the resident's attorneys $10,000, increase exposure of its reasonable accommodation policies and procedures, train staff about those policies and "submit regular reports to HUD on its efforts to promptly respond to reasonable accommodation requests," HUD said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Same-sex couples are discriminated against when searching for housing in online rental markets across the country, according to a new U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development study released Tuesday. In states like Maryland where such discrimination is illegal, the discrimination is even more pronounced , the study noted. The HUD study, described by the federal agency as "the first-ever national study examining housing discrimination against same-sex couples in the private rental market," involved the authors sending 7,000 emails to housing providers, allegedly from prospective heterosexual and same-sex couples, and then comparing the responses received.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Nearly three dozen workers at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development office in Baltimore - roughly a third of the agency's workforce in Maryland - are being forced to transfer out of state or take a buyout. The choice, which will affect 32 employees at the agency's South Howard Street field office, comes as part of a national reorganization aimed at saving about $45 million a year. The department is consolidating workers in 50 offices nationwide who facilitate the construction and rehabilitation of multifamily housing into 10 offices, HUD spokesman Jerry Brown said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
A mortgage lender based in Utah has agreed to pay a Baltimore woman $13,000 for denying her a loan because she was pregnant and on maternity leave, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Tuesday. Primary Residential Mortgage Inc., based in Salt Lake City, also agreed to adopt a parental leave policy, to ensure its employees are complying with family status provisions of the Fair Housing Act, which prevents lending discrimination based on other applicant traits including sex, race and religion.
NEWS
July 16, 2000
SUMMIT PARK is an attractive Baltimore County neighborhood where a well-priced house does not usually languish on the market. But one look inside 6716 Old Pimlico Road suggests the three-bedroom rancher is unlikely to sell for its asking price of $150,000. Although the sleek house sits among big, old trees, the interior is a vandalized wreck. Everything of value has been stripped. All the appliances are gone; so is the kitchen sink. Holes in the walls indicate where pipes used to be. Welcome to another HUD-foreclosure house.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Department of Housing and Urban Development plans to seek a ban on a certain type of down payment assistance that has grown sevenfold this decade and contributed to a surge in foreclosures of government-backed mortgages. Nonprofit groups, such as Nehemiah Corp. of America and AmeriDream Inc. of Gaithersburg, Md., provide the down payment help and are then reimbursed by the seller. The programs are "a contributing factor of increased risk in our portfolio" of loans, HUD spokesman Lemar Wooley said in an e-mail.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
The number of renters experiencing “worst case” housing needs has increased by almost half since the beginning of the Great Recession, according to a just-released summary of a forthcoming report from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. In 2007, there were 5.9 million very low-income households that were designated as having worst-case needs, according to the summary. By 2011, 8.5 million households qualified as worst-case scenarios because their rent burdens were extreme - more than half of their income went to rent, HUD said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Monday that it is instituting a 90-day foreclosure moratorium on Federal Housing Administration-insured mortgages in Maryland areas hard hit by Hurricane Sandy. As part of President Obama's disaster declaration last week, the housing department is implementing foreclosure relief and other assistance for homeowners and low-income renters in 18 Maryland jurisdictions. “Families who may have been forced from their homes need to know that help is available to begin the rebuilding process,” HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan said in a statement.
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