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NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2005
You know Huckleberry Finn and Huckleberry Hound. But do you know the fruit for which they are named? You may not, given the confusion that swirls around the term huckleberry. In Maryland, four species of huckleberries are found. Here it is a little blue fruit with 10 hard seeds that make it less than a culinary delicacy. Some folks also call the state's wild blueberries huckleberries. But head west to Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon and Washington, and you'll find people who have an entirely different idea of what a huckleberry is. Gift shops sell huckleberry jelly, candies, soaps and lotions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Steve Fox and Martha Todd, owners of Towson's Bread and Circuses Bistro, know how to get things done — and that bodes well for their restaurant. Right now, the food at Bread and Circuses is on the safe side and the service needs fine-tuning. But Fox and Todd already have some plans in the works for the menu, and with their can-do attitude, the petite bistro has the potential to be something special. Fox and Todd have been hustling since 2009 when they opened French Press Cafe, a small coffee shop in downtown Towson.
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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1999
LAUREL, Del. -- Phil Sheridan is on a botanical treasure hunt, and he needs your help.Now, while dogwood buds fatten, ospreys spruce up their nests, and rivers shimmer in early spring light, Sheridan wants you out of the house and into the woods. Especially the oak woods above the banks of Maryland's coastal rivers.The scientist has been thwarted in attempts to find new specimens of the state's rarest shrub, the boxwood huckleberry, officially classified as an endangered species. The little evergreen, with its cup-shaped flowers and delicate white berries, is a relic of the Ice Age. Only two tiny plants are known to survive in Maryland, and both are dying.
NEWS
By Steve Almond and Steve Almond,Los Angeles Times | February 25, 2007
Finn Jon Clinch Random House / 292 pages / $23.95 Jon Clinch has staked himself to a stiff challenge in his debut novel: casting Mark Twain's monstrous creation Pap Finn - feckless father of Huck - as a leading man. The resulting book is dark and often gripping, though marred by stylistic excess and a shortage of pathos. I suspect the central academic achievement of Finn will be to transport the world's Twain scholars into a collective tizzy. Clinch has, as they say, taken liberties with the back story.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2001
With sprouts of new leaves and runners popping new shoots, greenhouses in Northeast Washington hold conservationists' best hope for saving the rarest plant in Maryland. Offspring grown from snippets of Maryland's box huckleberry are thriving there. Plant breeders propagated what is believed to be four times the number of the delicate, low-spreading evergreen shrubs that grow wild in Maryland. But that is four times one plant. The apparent lone - and ailing - wild survivor sports a few spindly stems poking from beneath rotting leaves and bramble on a wooded Anne Arundel County slope near the headwaters of the Magothy River.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2003
The Tennessee box huckleberry's greenery is lush. The Kentucky plants send up vigorous shoots. The Maryland plant - Maryland's rarest plant and the rarest of the box huckleberries - takes more coaxing. Not that any of the samples of this endangered species that has been around since the Ice Age grow weed-fast, a major frustration for researchers at the National Arboretum in Washington yearning for quick propagation. Spurred by the plight of the plant - one puny specimen is left in the wild, on a slope of the Magothy River north of Annapolis - researchers are preparing to breed survival into Maryland's cultivar, mixing its out-of-state relatives into the gene pool.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2002
Not only has Maryland's rarest plant lived another year -- to the surprise of some conservationists -- but what last year was the state's lone wild box huckleberry plant is staging a mini-comeback during a drought that is starving other vegetation. "It doesn't look like it cares if there's a drought, does it?" said restoration ecologist Keith Underwood last week during his annual visit to what last year was a shrinking and ailing plant on a wooded slope by the headwaters of Anne Arundel County's Magothy River.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1995
Two people were captured and charged with stealing a car, breaking into a motor home and knocking down several small trees while driving through the rear yard of a house yesterday in an attempt to elude state police.A resident of Huckleberry Lane in Eldersburg called state police at 7:55 a.m. yesterday and said a car had pulled onto her property and parked behind her motor home. When the woman went to check on the car, she told police, she saw a man and a woman climb out a window of her motor home and run to an Oldsmobile to leave.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Steve Fox and Martha Todd, owners of Towson's Bread and Circuses Bistro, know how to get things done — and that bodes well for their restaurant. Right now, the food at Bread and Circuses is on the safe side and the service needs fine-tuning. But Fox and Todd already have some plans in the works for the menu, and with their can-do attitude, the petite bistro has the potential to be something special. Fox and Todd have been hustling since 2009 when they opened French Press Cafe, a small coffee shop in downtown Towson.
NEWS
By Steve Almond and Steve Almond,Los Angeles Times | February 25, 2007
Finn Jon Clinch Random House / 292 pages / $23.95 Jon Clinch has staked himself to a stiff challenge in his debut novel: casting Mark Twain's monstrous creation Pap Finn - feckless father of Huck - as a leading man. The resulting book is dark and often gripping, though marred by stylistic excess and a shortage of pathos. I suspect the central academic achievement of Finn will be to transport the world's Twain scholars into a collective tizzy. Clinch has, as they say, taken liberties with the back story.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2005
You know Huckleberry Finn and Huckleberry Hound. But do you know the fruit for which they are named? You may not, given the confusion that swirls around the term huckleberry. In Maryland, four species of huckleberries are found. Here it is a little blue fruit with 10 hard seeds that make it less than a culinary delicacy. Some folks also call the state's wild blueberries huckleberries. But head west to Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon and Washington, and you'll find people who have an entirely different idea of what a huckleberry is. Gift shops sell huckleberry jelly, candies, soaps and lotions.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2003
The Tennessee box huckleberry's greenery is lush. The Kentucky plants send up vigorous shoots. The Maryland plant - Maryland's rarest plant and the rarest of the box huckleberries - takes more coaxing. Not that any of the samples of this endangered species that has been around since the Ice Age grow weed-fast, a major frustration for researchers at the National Arboretum in Washington yearning for quick propagation. Spurred by the plight of the plant - one puny specimen is left in the wild, on a slope of the Magothy River north of Annapolis - researchers are preparing to breed survival into Maryland's cultivar, mixing its out-of-state relatives into the gene pool.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2002
Not only has Maryland's rarest plant lived another year -- to the surprise of some conservationists -- but what last year was the state's lone wild box huckleberry plant is staging a mini-comeback during a drought that is starving other vegetation. "It doesn't look like it cares if there's a drought, does it?" said restoration ecologist Keith Underwood last week during his annual visit to what last year was a shrinking and ailing plant on a wooded slope by the headwaters of Anne Arundel County's Magothy River.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2001
With sprouts of new leaves and runners popping new shoots, greenhouses in Northeast Washington hold conservationists' best hope for saving the rarest plant in Maryland. Offspring grown from snippets of Maryland's box huckleberry are thriving there. Plant breeders propagated what is believed to be four times the number of the delicate, low-spreading evergreen shrubs that grow wild in Maryland. But that is four times one plant. The apparent lone - and ailing - wild survivor sports a few spindly stems poking from beneath rotting leaves and bramble on a wooded Anne Arundel County slope near the headwaters of the Magothy River.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1999
LAUREL, Del. -- Phil Sheridan is on a botanical treasure hunt, and he needs your help.Now, while dogwood buds fatten, ospreys spruce up their nests, and rivers shimmer in early spring light, Sheridan wants you out of the house and into the woods. Especially the oak woods above the banks of Maryland's coastal rivers.The scientist has been thwarted in attempts to find new specimens of the state's rarest shrub, the boxwood huckleberry, officially classified as an endangered species. The little evergreen, with its cup-shaped flowers and delicate white berries, is a relic of the Ice Age. Only two tiny plants are known to survive in Maryland, and both are dying.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1995
Two people were captured and charged with stealing a car, breaking into a motor home and knocking down several small trees while driving through the rear yard of a house yesterday in an attempt to elude state police.A resident of Huckleberry Lane in Eldersburg called state police at 7:55 a.m. yesterday and said a car had pulled onto her property and parked behind her motor home. When the woman went to check on the car, she told police, she saw a man and a woman climb out a window of her motor home and run to an Oldsmobile to leave.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
Mark Twain(1835-1910)Born Samuel Clemens, Twain's "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," coupled with his lecturing, brought him his initial popularity.Twain released his most highly acclaimed work, "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" and "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" in 1876.His last great Mississippi fiction, "The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson" came almost 20 years later.Because of Twain's insight and sense of humor he will be remembered as an irreverent jester.-- Benet's Reader's Encyclopedia of American LiteraturePub Date: 05/30/99
NEWS
By Story by Tom Dunkel and Story by Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
For in much wisdom is much grief; and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow. Ecclesiastes 1:18 A bomb went off inside Stephen Vicchio's head. The explosion occurred shortly before 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 25th. It was a crisp, cusp-of-autumn evening in Annapolis.
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