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Hubris

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NEWS
January 23, 2013
Why does Ray Lewis continue to spout this nonsense about God rooting for him over every other NFL team he plays ("Ravens Q&A with Mike Preston ," Jan. 22)? Has he spoken to God? Does God favor him because he has six kids by four women, none of whom he is married to? Does God just not think Tom Brady is as holy as Ray Lewis? Please enlighten me Ray: What makes you the chosen one? Scott Jackson
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 18, 2013
One of the great things about American politics is its capacity for punishing hubris. For the ancient Greeks, hubris didn't merely describe god-like arrogance. It was a crime, usually defined as taking too much pleasure in the humiliation of your foes. In its modern usage it usually means the pride that comes before the fall. In the wake of Barack Obama's State of the Union address, both connotations seem at least a little apt. We are well into our fourth month of epidemic thumb-suckery over the question, "Are the Republicans doomed?"
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NEWS
November 16, 2012
It's amazing that the men who ran the CIA and the war in Afghanistan had so much time on their hands ("Pieces of a puzzle," Nov. 14). The indiscretions of former CIA Director David Petraeus and Gen. John Allen are an embarrassment. I hate to think what the "boots on the ground" are saying about their leaders today. However, in the case of Mr. Petraeus it was more than a fall from grace, more than a personal failing and poor judgment. It was blatant disregard for national security.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
Why does Ray Lewis continue to spout this nonsense about God rooting for him over every other NFL team he plays ("Ravens Q&A with Mike Preston ," Jan. 22)? Has he spoken to God? Does God favor him because he has six kids by four women, none of whom he is married to? Does God just not think Tom Brady is as holy as Ray Lewis? Please enlighten me Ray: What makes you the chosen one? Scott Jackson
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | March 13, 2004
AS THE GREEKS knew so well, hubris commonly precedes the fall of the high and mighty. And recently, corporate America's modern rendition of that age-old story line has been on plentiful and, for many, satisfying display. At one point in proximate Manhattan courtrooms, fallen corporate deities were lined up like bowling pins ready to be tumbled. Not only was Martha Stewart on trial, but so were small-town cable-TV king John J. Rigas and Tyco's imperial CEO, L. Dennis Kozlowski -- even as WorldCom chief financial officer Scott D. Sullivan turned prosecution witness against his firm's bold founder, Bernard J. Ebbers, and they both were indicted in the nation's largest corporate fraud ever.
NEWS
October 26, 2000
HUBRIS (hyoobris): n. Overbearing pride or presumption; arrogance. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger has got it. And a lot of explaining to do. In a Wednesday story, Sun reporters Walter F. Roche Jr. and David Nitkin pointed out the convergence of the public and private lives of the Baltimore County executive who is weighing a race for governor of Maryland. What is troubling about the disclosures is the degree to which Mr. Ruppersberger has shown arrogant disregard for the principle that a public official should avoid even the appearance of a conflict of interest.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | November 5, 2004
CHICAGO - A lot of Americans cast their ballots Tuesday out of hope, or fear, that President Bush will govern in the next four years pretty much as he has the last four years. But, as the late economist Herb Stein was fond of saying, any trend that is unsustainable tends not to be sustained. Mr. Bush will find that the choices he made in his first term will force different ones in his second. He came into office four years ago under what appeared to be marvelously auspicious circumstances.
NEWS
September 21, 2007
Few Sun readers should be surprised by the results of the latest Baltimore homelessness census ("City's chronically homeless on rise," Sept. 15). As Julie Scharper reports, the census found that 50 percent of the estimated 3,000 individuals found without housing on the cold January day the census was conducted had been homeless for more than one year, and that 25 percent had been without housing more than three years. Baltimore no longer can afford a housing policy that, at best, ignores the needs of our poorest and most vulnerable neighbors.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 4, 1996
Those big brains in the State and Treasury departments had Louis Farrakhan right where they wanted him. True to form, they let him off the hook.These geniuses should have let Libyan leader Col. Muammar el Kadafi give that $1 billion to Farrakhan. It would have been fascinating to see what the Nation of Islam leader would have done with it. The bottom line is he would have had to produce. The job of redeeming America's inner cities -- improving the schools, upgrading the housing, starting businesses to employ the jobless -- would have been Farrakhan's.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | May 13, 1993
Washington.--When Earl Weaver was manager of Baltimore's Orioles and bane of American League umpires, he would charge out of the dugout bellowing, ''Are you gonna get any better or is this it?'' Today that question is being asked about the Clinton administration. The answer is: This is it.This is what liberal government looks like -- Lyndon Johnson redux. Consider two examples, the administration's plan for fine-tuning the Balkan civil war, and the administration's plan for fine-tuning the fairness of American society.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
It's amazing that the men who ran the CIA and the war in Afghanistan had so much time on their hands ("Pieces of a puzzle," Nov. 14). The indiscretions of former CIA Director David Petraeus and Gen. John Allen are an embarrassment. I hate to think what the "boots on the ground" are saying about their leaders today. However, in the case of Mr. Petraeus it was more than a fall from grace, more than a personal failing and poor judgment. It was blatant disregard for national security.
NEWS
September 21, 2007
Few Sun readers should be surprised by the results of the latest Baltimore homelessness census ("City's chronically homeless on rise," Sept. 15). As Julie Scharper reports, the census found that 50 percent of the estimated 3,000 individuals found without housing on the cold January day the census was conducted had been homeless for more than one year, and that 25 percent had been without housing more than three years. Baltimore no longer can afford a housing policy that, at best, ignores the needs of our poorest and most vulnerable neighbors.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 27, 2007
CHICAGO -- During the Democratic debate in South Carolina, I heard something I never expected to hear: Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton coming out against U.S. military intervention. At least I think she was coming out against U.S. military intervention. Asked if U.S. troops should be sent to Darfur, the New York Democrat made a valiant effort to dodge the question by declaiming about sanctions, divestment and U.N. peacekeepers. But when pressed, "How about American troops on the ground?" she finally said, a bit awkwardly, "American ground troops I don't think belong in Darfur at this time."
NEWS
By W. David Myers and W. David Myers,Los Angeles Times | December 24, 2006
Guantanamo and the Abuse of Presidential Power Joseph Margulies Simon & Schuster/ 322 pages/ $25 The number of books treating the war on terror and the Iraq war grows exponentially. Increasingly these books focus on the strategic flaws that may now be leading to catastrophe. Lost in the shuffle is a smaller-scale tragedy that may eventually wound the United States as deeply as the injury inflicted by a looming military debacle in the Mideast and Central Asia. As Joseph Margulies shows in his riveting Guantanamo and the Abuse of Presidential Power, dealing with "enemy combatants" has become an unprecedented and dangerous experiment in unrestrained presidential power that, if unchecked, will fundamentally weaken the individual protections offered by the Constitution.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | November 5, 2004
CHICAGO - A lot of Americans cast their ballots Tuesday out of hope, or fear, that President Bush will govern in the next four years pretty much as he has the last four years. But, as the late economist Herb Stein was fond of saying, any trend that is unsustainable tends not to be sustained. Mr. Bush will find that the choices he made in his first term will force different ones in his second. He came into office four years ago under what appeared to be marvelously auspicious circumstances.
TOPIC
May 30, 2004
Forty years ago, there were only two ways to see the Indianapolis 500 - be among the lucky 400,000 or so who got into the packed track on race day, or go to a closed circuit television broadcast of the race. That's right. In the early 1960s, thousands spent their Memorial Day in darkened movie theaters watching cars race around the venerable 21/2-mile rectangle. Few events other than championship boxing matches could sell tickets to closed-circuit broadcasts. But the Indianapolis 500 could.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 18, 2013
One of the great things about American politics is its capacity for punishing hubris. For the ancient Greeks, hubris didn't merely describe god-like arrogance. It was a crime, usually defined as taking too much pleasure in the humiliation of your foes. In its modern usage it usually means the pride that comes before the fall. In the wake of Barack Obama's State of the Union address, both connotations seem at least a little apt. We are well into our fourth month of epidemic thumb-suckery over the question, "Are the Republicans doomed?"
NEWS
By Hal Piper | November 16, 1996
YOU CAN HAVE the '90s; David Gelernter will take the '30s. When I heard him speak a couple of years ago, he was a Yale professor working on whether emotion could be designed into computers. But his topic that day was modern technology. Mr. Gelernter thinks it is pretty mediocre, driven more by narcissism than human need.Thus we have a lot of gee-whiz computer stuff, from virtual shopping to virtual sex, but too few technologies aimed at alleviating social problems -- or even making life easier or more pleasant.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | March 13, 2004
AS THE GREEKS knew so well, hubris commonly precedes the fall of the high and mighty. And recently, corporate America's modern rendition of that age-old story line has been on plentiful and, for many, satisfying display. At one point in proximate Manhattan courtrooms, fallen corporate deities were lined up like bowling pins ready to be tumbled. Not only was Martha Stewart on trial, but so were small-town cable-TV king John J. Rigas and Tyco's imperial CEO, L. Dennis Kozlowski -- even as WorldCom chief financial officer Scott D. Sullivan turned prosecution witness against his firm's bold founder, Bernard J. Ebbers, and they both were indicted in the nation's largest corporate fraud ever.
NEWS
October 26, 2000
HUBRIS (hyoobris): n. Overbearing pride or presumption; arrogance. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger has got it. And a lot of explaining to do. In a Wednesday story, Sun reporters Walter F. Roche Jr. and David Nitkin pointed out the convergence of the public and private lives of the Baltimore County executive who is weighing a race for governor of Maryland. What is troubling about the disclosures is the degree to which Mr. Ruppersberger has shown arrogant disregard for the principle that a public official should avoid even the appearance of a conflict of interest.
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