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Hubert Humphrey

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NEWS
February 1, 2013
I read with interest Jules Witcover's recent commentary, "Don't count Biden out in 2016" (Jan. 29), suggesting that Vice President Joe Biden might be a serious candidate for president in 2016. If history is a guide, the chances of a sitting Vice President Biden being elected president in 2016 are remote. In the 25 presidential elections of the 20th century, George H.W. Bush was the only sitting vice president elected president. Richard Nixon, Hubert Humphrey and Al Gore all lost.
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NEWS
Jules Witcover | August 4, 2014
What if Hillary Clinton doesn't seek the presidency in 2016? Waiting patiently and noncommittally in the wings is Vice President Joe Biden. He might well be reluctant to take her on, considering the powerhouse she has become, with an army of Democratic women "Ready for Hillary" to unleash them. But almost certainly Mr. Biden would run if she didn't, and why not? Many, particularly Republicans relieved at not having to face her in the general election, would peddle their favorite impression: that Mr. Biden is a loose cannon who would run the country with his foot in his mouth.
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NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 23, 1992
REPUBLICANS are pretty good about settling presidential nomination contests early. Usually once the handwriting is on the wall, the presumptive losers drop out. In 1988, for example, Bob Dole was gone by March 29.The Democrats always fight on and on, to their regret.In '88, Michael Dukakis needed 2,081 delegates to clinch. He reached 2,264 on June 7 with a four-state primary sweep. Jesse Jackson vowed that night to stay in the campaign. He did not endorse Dukakis until July 18, and he insisted on being nominated and voted on at the convention on July 20.In '84, Walter Mondale had 2,008 delegates, 41 more than a majority, after the June 6 primaries.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
I read with interest Jules Witcover's recent commentary, "Don't count Biden out in 2016" (Jan. 29), suggesting that Vice President Joe Biden might be a serious candidate for president in 2016. If history is a guide, the chances of a sitting Vice President Biden being elected president in 2016 are remote. In the 25 presidential elections of the 20th century, George H.W. Bush was the only sitting vice president elected president. Richard Nixon, Hubert Humphrey and Al Gore all lost.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | March 27, 1996
THE 1968 PRESIDENTIAL campaign was unusual -- unique -- in that the vice-presidential candidates got almost as much attention as the presidential candidates at times. Sen. Edmund Muskie of Maine was the Democratic running mate of Vice President Hubert Humphrey. The Republican opposite number to Senator Muskie was, of course, our own governor, Spiro T. Agnew, assisting Richard Nixon.From the night Senator Muskie was nominated to be the Democratic vice-presidential candidate in bloody, tear-gassed Chicago that August, to Election Day morning on a golf course in Kennebunkport, Maine, on a warm, bright perfect New England autumn day, I covered the Muskie campaign for The Sun.The only week of the campaign that I was not on Muskie's plane, I was on Agnew's.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 29, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- Hitching his campaign to a conservative initiative that he hopes will propel him to victory in California, GOP presidential nominee Bob Dole told voters yesterday that it would be a hollow victory if they voted to end state affirmative-action programs but re-elected President Clinton.Dole warned that a second Clinton administration would undermine the California Civil Rights Initiative, a ballot proposition that would end racial considerations in state hiring, contracting and university admissions.
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS and RAY JENKINS,Ray Jenkins is editor of The Evening Sun's editorial pages | November 24, 1991
At the risk of ruining a pleasant Sunday morning, I have bad news for those who have grown weary of an overload of David Duke: The worst is yet to come.Two weeks ago I drew some ominous parallels between Mr. Duke and his forerunner in the colorful world of Louisiana demagoguery, Huey Long. It's not an exact comparison, because Long essentially exploited economic hardship which gripped the nation in the 1930s, while David Duke adds to the mix the explosive element of racial fear. This makes him less like Long than like former Gov. George Wallace of Alabama in the 1960s.
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 3, 2000
WASHINGTON -- How odd of God, whose mercy is supposedly infinite, to put an extra day in presidential election years, as though to prolong the punishment. But this will be only the fifth "double open" (both parties' nominations open because no incumbent president is running) in the 18 elections between 1932 and 2000. And it may produce the first close election since 1976. The winnowing of candidates in 1999 seems to have produced two two-man races. Unless New Jersey's Bill Bradley is elected, this will be the 10th consecutive election in which the winner (George Bush, John McCain or Al Gore)
NEWS
By Bradford Jacobs | July 2, 1993
PAT Nixon stood dutifully there in the receiving line. The pale, delicate face seemed stiffened by the hundreds of receptions White House protocol had imposed on her. On her right, the president looked stiff, too, and no wonder: This reception was for newspaper editors, a breed which seldom treated him kindly. Above the pained presidential grin there gleamed a couple of drops of the trade-mark perspiration.By far the crispest-looking of the three -- a shimmering blaze of blue and red, shot through with gold stripes and buttons -- was the rigid young Marine whose duty was to announce the guests, one by nervous one."
NEWS
Jules Witcover | August 4, 2014
What if Hillary Clinton doesn't seek the presidency in 2016? Waiting patiently and noncommittally in the wings is Vice President Joe Biden. He might well be reluctant to take her on, considering the powerhouse she has become, with an army of Democratic women "Ready for Hillary" to unleash them. But almost certainly Mr. Biden would run if she didn't, and why not? Many, particularly Republicans relieved at not having to face her in the general election, would peddle their favorite impression: that Mr. Biden is a loose cannon who would run the country with his foot in his mouth.
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 3, 2000
WASHINGTON -- How odd of God, whose mercy is supposedly infinite, to put an extra day in presidential election years, as though to prolong the punishment. But this will be only the fifth "double open" (both parties' nominations open because no incumbent president is running) in the 18 elections between 1932 and 2000. And it may produce the first close election since 1976. The winnowing of candidates in 1999 seems to have produced two two-man races. Unless New Jersey's Bill Bradley is elected, this will be the 10th consecutive election in which the winner (George Bush, John McCain or Al Gore)
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 29, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- Hitching his campaign to a conservative initiative that he hopes will propel him to victory in California, GOP presidential nominee Bob Dole told voters yesterday that it would be a hollow victory if they voted to end state affirmative-action programs but re-elected President Clinton.Dole warned that a second Clinton administration would undermine the California Civil Rights Initiative, a ballot proposition that would end racial considerations in state hiring, contracting and university admissions.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 14, 1996
MINNEAPOLIS -- In this campaign season, when panicky candidates everywhere are trying to squeeze themselves into the center, Republicans are taunting Sen. Paul Wellstone. He's beyond liberal, they say. He's "ultraliberal." No, wait: He's "embarrassingly liberal," way too liberal for Minnesota.Too liberal for Minnesota? The home of liberalism's patron saint, Hubert H. Humphrey, and his acolyte Walter Mondale?Thirty-four Senate seats are being contested this year. In most of the close races, the candidates are either trying to position themselves in the political center or moderate Democratic candidates face challenges from conservative Republicans.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | March 27, 1996
THE 1968 PRESIDENTIAL campaign was unusual -- unique -- in that the vice-presidential candidates got almost as much attention as the presidential candidates at times. Sen. Edmund Muskie of Maine was the Democratic running mate of Vice President Hubert Humphrey. The Republican opposite number to Senator Muskie was, of course, our own governor, Spiro T. Agnew, assisting Richard Nixon.From the night Senator Muskie was nominated to be the Democratic vice-presidential candidate in bloody, tear-gassed Chicago that August, to Election Day morning on a golf course in Kennebunkport, Maine, on a warm, bright perfect New England autumn day, I covered the Muskie campaign for The Sun.The only week of the campaign that I was not on Muskie's plane, I was on Agnew's.
NEWS
By Bradford Jacobs | July 2, 1993
PAT Nixon stood dutifully there in the receiving line. The pale, delicate face seemed stiffened by the hundreds of receptions White House protocol had imposed on her. On her right, the president looked stiff, too, and no wonder: This reception was for newspaper editors, a breed which seldom treated him kindly. Above the pained presidential grin there gleamed a couple of drops of the trade-mark perspiration.By far the crispest-looking of the three -- a shimmering blaze of blue and red, shot through with gold stripes and buttons -- was the rigid young Marine whose duty was to announce the guests, one by nervous one."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 23, 1992
REPUBLICANS are pretty good about settling presidential nomination contests early. Usually once the handwriting is on the wall, the presumptive losers drop out. In 1988, for example, Bob Dole was gone by March 29.The Democrats always fight on and on, to their regret.In '88, Michael Dukakis needed 2,081 delegates to clinch. He reached 2,264 on June 7 with a four-state primary sweep. Jesse Jackson vowed that night to stay in the campaign. He did not endorse Dukakis until July 18, and he insisted on being nominated and voted on at the convention on July 20.In '84, Walter Mondale had 2,008 delegates, 41 more than a majority, after the June 6 primaries.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 14, 1996
MINNEAPOLIS -- In this campaign season, when panicky candidates everywhere are trying to squeeze themselves into the center, Republicans are taunting Sen. Paul Wellstone. He's beyond liberal, they say. He's "ultraliberal." No, wait: He's "embarrassingly liberal," way too liberal for Minnesota.Too liberal for Minnesota? The home of liberalism's patron saint, Hubert H. Humphrey, and his acolyte Walter Mondale?Thirty-four Senate seats are being contested this year. In most of the close races, the candidates are either trying to position themselves in the political center or moderate Democratic candidates face challenges from conservative Republicans.
SPORTS
January 6, 1992
You'd think a USOC sponsor would know.The United States Postal Service is issuing its Winter Olympics stamps Saturday, but it has the dates for the Games wrong.According to the Jan. 6 issue of Linn's Stamp News, the inscription on the selvage of a pane of 35 stamps reads: "The XVI Olympic Winter Games will be held in Albertville, France, Feb. 8-25."The correct dates are Feb. 8-23.It is the second time the USPS has erred on a selvage inscription. Last April, it listed the wrong dates for Hubert Humphrey's vice presidency on the selvage of the Humphrey stamp.
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS and RAY JENKINS,Ray Jenkins is editor of The Evening Sun's editorial pages | November 24, 1991
At the risk of ruining a pleasant Sunday morning, I have bad news for those who have grown weary of an overload of David Duke: The worst is yet to come.Two weeks ago I drew some ominous parallels between Mr. Duke and his forerunner in the colorful world of Louisiana demagoguery, Huey Long. It's not an exact comparison, because Long essentially exploited economic hardship which gripped the nation in the 1930s, while David Duke adds to the mix the explosive element of racial fear. This makes him less like Long than like former Gov. George Wallace of Alabama in the 1960s.
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