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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
NASA officials have again postponed the launch of the shuttle Atlantis on a final mission to repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope. The delay, from February to at least May, means astronomers will have to wait three months more before two of Hubble's key scientific instruments can be used again. Engineers told Hubble managers they need more time to inspect and test the 18-year-old hardware that will replace a science data computer that failed on Sept. 27, and to train astronauts and build the tools they need to install it. "Our plan is to try to have it ready to ship to Kennedy [Space Center]
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
NASA has selected a Johns Hopkins University design for a $30 million camera to be installed in the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope in 1999.The Hubble Advanced Camera for Exploration (HACE) will be a major advance over the telescope's current camera, the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2. That instrument was installed during the space shuttle Endeavour's rescue mission last December.HACE will greatly enhance the telescope's "superlative imaging capabilities well into the next century," said Dr. Edward Weiler, NASA's Hubble program scientist.
NEWS
April 18, 1995
The Howard County Photography Society is sponsoring a program on photography with the Hubble Space Telescope at 7:30 p.m. April 26 at the Howard County Center for the Arts.Society members John Bedke and Zolton Levay from the Space Science Institute in Baltimore will discuss various aspects of the telescope and space photography.Also featured will be a display of slides and photos taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.The Howard County Center for the Arts is at 8510 High Ridge Road, Ellicott City.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | November 17, 2005
WASHINGTON -- NASA got what it wanted - and more - yesterday when the Senate approved a $16.5 billion annual spending plan for the space agency in an otherwise very tight budget year. The money will pay for the start-up of NASA's new moon-Mars venture, more space shuttle flights, a repair mission to the Hubble telescope and other programs. The spending plan for 2006, which passed 94-5, is a slight increase over the current budget. But the agency is looking at an expensive transition in the next few years as it tries to balance the cost of ending its shuttle program and International Space Station construction with the planned voyages to the moon and Mars.
NEWS
April 6, 2002
A month after undergoing the most sweeping tune-up in its 12-year history, the Hubble Space Telescope has been given a clean bill of health by NASA scientists. Preliminary tests showed that extensive new hardware installed by astronauts last month in a series of five grueling spacewalks appears to be working flawlessly. The centerpiece of last month's mission was a new electrical system and a state-of-the art camera that promises a tenfold improvement in the $2 billion telescope's ability to find distant objects.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
GREENBELT -- When folks at the Goddard Space Flight Center talk, Hubble listens.And then the flying space telescope -- the size of a city bus with wings -- responds. It turns its myopic eye toward a speck of light in the galaxy and locks onto it. It snaps a picture of a storm swirling around Saturn. It waits until a spinning blue ball called Earth passes from its field of vision so it can peer into the heavens again.All of this and so much more has gone on 24 hours a day, 365 days a year for three years and counting, because the Hubble Space Telescope never sleeps.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Reporter | November 5, 2006
Last week NASA gave the green light to a final mission to the Hubble Space Telescope by a space shuttle in 2008 to service, repair and upgrade the venerable 16-year-old orbiting observatory ? a visit that should extend the Hubble?s life to at least 2013. Already, the Hubble has been credited as having a greater impact on astronomy than any instrument since the telescope Galileo used to discover the moons of Jupiter. Here are some details of its remarkable record: Launch date April 24, 1990 Cost at launch $1.5 billion Spacecraft operations Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Science operations Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore GREATEST DISCOVERIES Galactic origins: Hubble?
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 8, 1993
Mission accomplished -- again.In their fourth successful space walk, the crew from the shuttle Endeavour outfitted the blurry-eyed Hubble Space Telescope today with its second pair of corrective lenses, extended the memory of its on-board computer and stowed a scientific instrument for return to Earth.And they finished the work in 6 hours and 45 minutes."I'm happy . . ." astronaut Tom Akers said after installing a co-processor that will enhance the memory of Hubble's computer.Tonight, astronauts F. Story Musgrave and Jeffrey Hoffman will attempt the last scheduled space walk to replace an electronics device that helps position the telescope's solar panels and install a backup power supply for the telescope's spectrograph.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
When the workweek ends at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, astronomers relax at an event known as the "Director's Sherry." There, in the Lyman Spitzer Board Room - a plain space that looks more like a university classroom than an executive lair - some of the field's most fortunate insiders share a beer, a glass of wine or a Coke and trade gossip about yet another fine week in science. The bright minds behind an instrument that has been called "the greatest eye in the universe," the Hubble Space Telescope, have grown accustomed to sharing good news at the genial Friday cocktail hour.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch | December 13, 1991
NASA thinks it has found and fixed a power problem aboard the Hubble Space Telescope that began in late July and by mid-September halted observations with one of the telescope's five stargazing electronic instruments.Joseph H. Rothenberg, associate director of flight projects for Hubble, said that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration plans to permit the Baltimore-based Space Telescope Science Institute to resume its regular schedule of observations next month with the spacecraft's Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph.
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