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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured distant reaches of the universe over the past 22 years, but with the end of the space shuttle program, has not been repaired since 2009. A filmmaker is challenging that decision with the documentary "Saving Hubble" and will speak in Baltimore on Tuesday. David Gaynes will speak at the Space Telescope Science Institute with his message about saving Hubble, which is expected to continue operating only through next year. NASA is focused on replacing Hubble with the James Webb Space Telescope in 2018.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Scientists are still hoping to learn much from Comet ISON, but as it fizzles, sky watchers who were hoping to see it can get a glimpse of Comet Lovejoy instead. Lovejoy, officialy known as C/2013 R1, came its closest to Earth on Nov. 19, about 37 million miles away, according to EarthSky.org . It is near the constellation Bootes and the bright star Arcturus just over the northeast horizon in the early mornings in December, and you can see it with binoculars. It will get closer to the horizon and harder to spot as the month goes on. Despite the fact that ISON is no longer expected to be bright enough to see with the naked eye, scientists are tracking it as it moves away from the sun. Those at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore plan to observe it with the Hubble Space Telescope once it moves far enough from the sun's glare.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 7, 2010
Ralph Vanderlipp, an electrical engineer whose work spanned the eras from World War II to the space age and into the computer age, died Nov. 3 of leukemia at Gilchrest Hospice Care in Towson. The long-time Columbia resident was 83. From serving as an electronics and radar technician on a cargo ship during the waning days of World War II to helping interpret data from the Hubble Space telescope, Mr. Vanderlipp spent decades on the cutting edge of electronics technology. "If you were to look up 'electrical engineer' in the dictionary, you would see his picture," said Bill Anderson, who was a young aerospace engineer working under contract for Lockheed-Martin when he first met Mr. Vanderlipp and considered him a mentor.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
EDITOR'S NOTE: What follows is a text-only version of this Hidden Maryland story. To view the full feature version, which includes photos, video and graphics, go here .  Once you've passed through a vestibule, an air shower, a changing room and three more doors separating the grime of life from the "clean room" where NASA is building the James Webb Space Telescope, a gust of 72-degree filtered air greets your face. That's the only exposed skin allowed inside. To prepare for the room, shoe-covering booties and a hair net go on first.
NEWS
April 21, 2010
Happy Anniversary to the Hubble Space Telescope , launched 20 years ago today. Since a start-up marred by a flawed mirror, Hubble scientists and engineers have overcome every challenge the telescope tossed them, making Hubble arguably the best-known, most productive engine of scientific discovery in history. The final upgrades made by spacewalking astronauts last May have left the telescope better equipped than ever to advance our understanding of the universe during the observatory's final years.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 14, 2009
Astronomers around the world got their first close-up look at the Hubble Space Telescope in seven years Wednesday as astronauts aboard the shuttle Atlantis closed in and captured the orbiting observatory for its final round of repairs and upgrades. "When we first had images of the Hubble Space Telescope, there were audible gasps of elation. This was truly a wonderful sight after seven years," said Jon Morse, NASA's director of astrophysics. Mission specialist Megan McArthur grabbed the 12-ton telescope with the shuttle's robot arm at 1:14 p.m. while orbiting 350 miles above western Australia.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | January 30, 2007
A workhorse deep space camera on the Hubble Space Telescope has shut down for the third time in less than a year, and NASA scientists say that only a fraction of its capability will be restored. The $86 million Advanced Camera for Surveys was near the end of its expected lifespan, officials said. Many of its functions will be assumed by new equipment scheduled to be installed during a space shuttle servicing mission in 2008. The ACS went dark and the entire orbiting observatory entered a protective "safe mode" Saturday about 7:30 a.m., when a backup power supply system failed.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 31, 2004
Tours of the Hubble Space Telescope control center, model rocket launches, talks by NASA experts and explanations of solar flares will be on tap today when the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt opens to the public for the first time since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Visitors will see Hubble's dimly lit control center, where scientists control the cameras used to capture the images of galaxies that enliven classroom walls around the country. The tour stops will include views of the 90-foot-high "clean room," with its dust-free environment for testing Hubble equipment; a life-size model of the Columbia space shuttle; the cumbersome space gloves worn by astronauts during Hubble servicing missions and a centrifuge where the durability of satellites is tested.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - The House overwhelmingly endorsed President Bush's plans to go to the moon and Mars but put its own imprint on the future of NASA yesterday, insisting that the space agency also concentrate on research programs and repairing the Hubble telescope. The Hubble, along with science programs and aeronautics research, is popular in Congress partly because the contracts generate thousands of jobs, injecting millions into the economies of many lawmakers' districts. The first blueprint for NASA's future in five years passed 383-15.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
THE REASON for NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe's refusal to send astronauts into space to retrofit the Hubble Space Telescope can be summed up in two words: too risky. But a new report by a panel of experts has undercut his argument, finding that a manned repair mission is only slightly more risky than planned flights to the International Space Station. The panel also raised significant doubts that an unmanned robotics mission could do the job. Fixing Hubble so it can continue to inform and enhance our knowledge of stars, planets and deep space is the objective here, and Mr. O'Keefe should put his money on astronauts, not machines.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured what space scientists called potentially the "comet of the century", Comet ISON, as it speeds toward Earth at 47,000 mph. The comet, technically known as  C/2012 S1,  will pass within 1.1 million miles of Earth seven months from now, and it could be visible with the naked eye if it doesn't break up passing by the sun. It could be so bright, in fact, that it would outshine the full moon, according to...
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Description: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, the most distant of its kind ever spotted. It was 4 percent farther away and 350 million years older than the previous record-holder, a supernova found three months ago by a team at the U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Researchers: David O. Jones of the Johns Hopkins University was the lead author on a paper detailing the discovery.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured distant reaches of the universe over the past 22 years, but with the end of the space shuttle program, has not been repaired since 2009. A filmmaker is challenging that decision with the documentary "Saving Hubble" and will speak in Baltimore on Tuesday. David Gaynes will speak at the Space Telescope Science Institute with his message about saving Hubble, which is expected to continue operating only through next year. NASA is focused on replacing Hubble with the James Webb Space Telescope in 2018.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
First, the bad news: The Andromeda galaxy, an agglomeration of 1 trillion stars that is visible to the naked eye, is hurtling through space at 250,000 miles per hour — and it's coming right at us. What's more, NASA astronomers in Baltimore said Thursday, while Andromeda barrels into our Milky Way, a companion galaxy will join in what the space agency is billing as a "titanic collision. " Now, the good news: With Andromeda still 2.5 million light years away, the collision won't take place for another 4 billion years, the astronomers said.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 7, 2010
Ralph Vanderlipp, an electrical engineer whose work spanned the eras from World War II to the space age and into the computer age, died Nov. 3 of leukemia at Gilchrest Hospice Care in Towson. The long-time Columbia resident was 83. From serving as an electronics and radar technician on a cargo ship during the waning days of World War II to helping interpret data from the Hubble Space telescope, Mr. Vanderlipp spent decades on the cutting edge of electronics technology. "If you were to look up 'electrical engineer' in the dictionary, you would see his picture," said Bill Anderson, who was a young aerospace engineer working under contract for Lockheed-Martin when he first met Mr. Vanderlipp and considered him a mentor.
NEWS
April 23, 2010
Happy anniversary to the Hubble Space Telescope , launched 20 years ago today. Since a start-up marred by a flawed mirror, Hubble scientists and engineers have overcome every challenge the telescope tossed them, making Hubble arguably the best-known, most-productive engine of scientific discovery in history. The final upgrades made by spacewalking astronauts last May have left the telescope better equipped than ever to advance our understanding of the universe during the observatory's final years.
NEWS
By DOUG BIRCH and DOUG BIRCH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 1996
If all goes well, the Space Shuttle Columbia will be in orbit again tomorrow.Think of it: A boxy, stubby-winged, tempermental craft that weighs 181,000 pounds, in service since 1981. You might think twice before driving cross-country in a 1981 car. Columbia has logged 77.5 million miles during its previous 20 flights, has orbited the earth 2,944 times and is booked for use through 2002.Columbia and its three sibling shuttles are best known for their distinctive shape and for the program's low-point the shuttle Challenger exploding Jan. 28, 1986 in a fireball caused by a leak in one of its solid-fuel rocket boosters.
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