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NEWS
January 25, 2004
IT HAS BEEN our eye on the universe, peering farther into space than had ever been done before. A billion times more! With its cameras clicking and spectrographs turning, the Hubble Space Telescope offers stargazers and scientists a view once only imagined. And what a razzle-dazzle, nerve-firing view - the largest volcano in the solar system, a roiling storm on Saturn, black holes, dying stars, galaxies in the making. This bus-sized telescope in the sky has popularized the science of astronomy in a palpable way for those of us who can't define spectroscopy.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center last month, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and space agency Administrator Charles Bolden stressed the importance of maintaining budget support for the James Webb Space Telescope, keeping it on track for a 2018 launch. Sticking to that schedule is the job of the Webb telescope's project manager, Bill Ochs, who, from his office on the Greenbelt campus, oversees all of the moving parts slated to come together and be blasted into space in 41/2 years. It's a complicated job, Ochs acknowledged, but since new development and spending plans were approved three years ago for the delayed and over-budget project, things have been running smoothly.
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NEWS
May 17, 2005
On May 15, 2005 HARRIETT I. HUBBLE; beloved wife of Howard H. Hubble; devoted mother of Anita (Kenneth) Reich, Richard (Regina) Hubble, Laurie Ehrhardt; loving grandmother of Michael Reich, Garrett and April Ehrhardt, Drew and Hailey Hubble; dear sister of Ann Hobbs and David Sutton. Also survived by three great grandchildren. Family will receive friends Tuesday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. at HARRY H. WITZKE'S FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City, where a funeral service will be held Wednesday 11 A.M. Entombment Crest Lawn Memorial Gardens.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
A comet looping behind the sun right now could emerge this fall as a once-in-a-lifetime spectacle that shines in the sky so brightly, it is visible with the naked eye around the world - if it survives. Comet C/2012 S1, dubbed Comet ISON in honor of the network of observatories responsible for spotting it, is expected to pass about 40 million miles from Earth in December. As it grazes the sun, it could glow on the early morning and evening horizons from November into January if it survives that close-up encounter.
NEWS
June 11, 2003
On Monday, June 9, 2003, JACK S. HUBBLE, 60, of Belleville, IL, born May 31, 1943 in Bel Air, MD. Mr Hubble was an electrician and builder of homes. He was a member of the Waterloo Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. He was preceded in death by his mother, Margaret I., nee Pyle, Hubble. Surviving are his wife, Jane, nee Bridges, Hubble and his father, Harry L. Hubble of White Hall, MD. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses or to Hubble Brain Tumor Survivors Foundation, a foundation@NHF.
NEWS
January 23, 2005
Suddenly on January 19, 2005, JOHN DELANEY HUBBLE, SR., beloved husband of Nancy C. Hubble (nee Perrera), devoted father of Karen Hubble Bisbee and the late John D. Hubble, Jr., dear grandfather of Abigail Churchill Bisbee, son-in-law of Dorothy M. Brittingham; father-in-law of Stephen F. Bisbee. The family will receive friends at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Rd., (bltwy exit 26A), on Saturday from 6 to 8 P.M. and Sunday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M. Funeral Services will be held in the Church of the Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St., at Melrose Ave., on Monday at 11 A.M. Interment in Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
May 15, 2005
On May 12, 2005, MARGARET MARY HUBBLE (nee De Carlo), beloved wife of the late Carl E. Hubble; loving mother of Robert L. Hubble and his wife George, Linda Hartman, and Sharon Flynn and her husband Tom; dear sister of Virginia Stanley; dear aunt/Godmother of Sandy Stemmer; devoted grandmother of six and great-grandmother of five. Friends may all at the family owned EVANS CHAPEL OF MEMORIES-PARKVILLE (8800 Harford Road) from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., Sunday. A Funeral Service will be held in the funeral home chapel on Monday at 10 A.M. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery at Garrison Forest.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
THIS IS about the time we were expecting a rescue mission to be announced that would save two popular space programs. A space shuttle team would be dispatched to repair and update aging equipment on the Hubble Space Telescope, thus extending the life of an invaluable scientific tool. And the shuttle mission would mark the resumption of manned space flight, which has been halted for two years, since Columbia's explosion over Texas. Experts have cleared the safety risk; Congress has voted its approval.
NEWS
September 2, 1991
Continuing technology glitches aboard the Hubble Space Telescope -- this time balky gyroscopes -- may push the National Aeronautics and Space Administration into an emergency rescue mission a year sooner than the planned 1993 flight to fix flawed optics.Project managers may face a Hobson's choice: fix the gyroscopes, whose complete failure would end the Hubble's usefulness, and live with the degraded performance of the flawed main mirror, or gamble that neither the gyroscopes nor the oscillating solar arrays will fail so catastrophically they cut short Hubble's life.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 20, 1991
When the Hubble Space Telescope was first proposed, the New York Times ran a story saying that Baltimore would become the center of the universe for astronomy. The reality is that because of the Hubble's problems, it's become instead one of a handful of major observatories around the world. A notable achievement, but much less than was hoped.Although the Hubble can still be fixed, we're talking about the proverbial race against time here: The telescope is expected to last only about 15 years before major systems begin to fail and fixing it becomes impractical.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, pete.pichaske@gmail.com | April 26, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them — and encourages others to do so as well. Kalirai, 35, is an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. For two years, he worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history, and for the past 2 1/2 years has been the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful than Hubble.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured what space scientists called potentially the "comet of the century", Comet ISON, as it speeds toward Earth at 47,000 mph. The comet, technically known as  C/2012 S1,  will pass within 1.1 million miles of Earth seven months from now, and it could be visible with the naked eye if it doesn't break up passing by the sun. It could be so bright, in fact, that it would outshine the full moon, according to...
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Description: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, the most distant of its kind ever spotted. It was 4 percent farther away and 350 million years older than the previous record-holder, a supernova found three months ago by a team at the U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Researchers: David O. Jones of the Johns Hopkins University was the lead author on a paper detailing the discovery.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured distant reaches of the universe over the past 22 years, but with the end of the space shuttle program, has not been repaired since 2009. A filmmaker is challenging that decision with the documentary "Saving Hubble" and will speak in Baltimore on Tuesday. David Gaynes will speak at the Space Telescope Science Institute with his message about saving Hubble, which is expected to continue operating only through next year. NASA is focused on replacing Hubble with the James Webb Space Telescope in 2018.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 11, 2012
Pluto may not be a full-fledged planet, but it has five moons, astronomers have discovered. The fifth one is 6 to 15 miles wide and circles the dwarf planet in a 58,000-mile orbit, according to a research team that includes one scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel. The moon is, for now, being called S/2012 (134340) 1. It was detected in nine separate sets of images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 since June 26. The fact that a dwarf planet like Pluto can have so many moons is intriguing to scientists, according to NASA officials.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
First, the bad news: The Andromeda galaxy, an agglomeration of 1 trillion stars that is visible to the naked eye, is hurtling through space at 250,000 miles per hour — and it's coming right at us. What's more, NASA astronomers in Baltimore said Thursday, while Andromeda barrels into our Milky Way, a companion galaxy will join in what the space agency is billing as a "titanic collision. " Now, the good news: With Andromeda still 2.5 million light years away, the collision won't take place for another 4 billion years, the astronomers said.
NEWS
March 24, 2005
ROCKET SCIENTIST Michael D. Griffin's return to NASA, this time as its top administrator, seems assured. But that's the last guaranteed win the current head of the space department at Johns Hopkins' Applied Physics Lab can count on for a while. Mr. Griffin, with an armful of academic degrees and decades of management, flight and space program experience, is a great choice for the country's top space post. He will need all his skills to steer the research and exploration agency through its current mission shakeup.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2011
When science center directors from around the country gather in Baltimore this month for their annual conference, they'll be able to see one of the largest scientific instruments ever made: a full-scale mock-up of the James Webb Space Telescope. Northrop Grumman, the prime contractor working to assemble the $8.7 billion Webb telescope, plans to erect a four-story-high replica of it as a free public attraction along the promenade outside the Maryland Science Center . Planned as a replacement for the 21-year-old Hubble Space Telescope, the Webb project has been described as the "space observatory of the next decade" - larger and far more powerful than the Hubble.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
The Baltimore astrophysicist credited with discovering "dark energy," the mysterious force believed to be accelerating the expansion of the universe, says he has used the Hubble Space Telescope to disprove a competing explanation for the phenomenon. Adam Riess, of the Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute, says his team, using Hubble's new Wide Field Camera 3, was able to look at more stars, in both visible and infrared wavelengths. That eliminated errors introduced in previous work, which compared measurements from Hubble and other telescopes.
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