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By Richard Halloran | September 29, 2004
THE ASCENT OF Hu Jintao to the third of the top three posts in China's hierarchy will most likely cause subtle changes in Beijing's relations with the United States and with its neighbors in North Korea, South Korea, Japan and Southeast Asia -- but not on the sensitive issue of Taiwan. In China, political power rests on three pillars: the Communist Party of China (CPC), the government bureaucracy and the People's Liberation Army (PLA). On Sept. 19, Mr. Hu was named chairman of China's Central Military Commission and, in effect, commander of 2 million men and women in the world's largest military force.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
During the 11 years she has lived in Howard County, former Centennial Lane Elementary School Principal Florence Hu has seen the school district become a magnet for overseas families looking to move to the U.S. — so much so, that she has received email inquiries about the system from parents who live as far away as South Korea. But even parents who come armed with specific information about schools discover stark differences between the American approach to education and that of their own country, she says.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 2002
BEIJING - In his secret acceptance speech after being appointed China's Communist Party chief on Friday, Hu Jintao pledged that on important matters he would "seek instruction and listen to the views" of his predecessor, Jiang Zemin, according to two party officials who attended briefings on the meeting. The words Hu used were stronger than customary farewells to retiring leaders, the officials said, and amounted to a promise of deference, declared before the new senior leadership. Hu's speech, to a closed caucus of party leaders Friday morning, has not been released to the public.
NEWS
By Xiaorong Li | November 17, 2009
While President Barack Obama is in Beijing this week, he has an opportunity to address two key issues, climate change and human rights concerns, simultaneously. Here's the kind of speech the president should give: "President Hu Jintao, ladies & gentlemen, it is a great pleasure to be in Beijing. My administration has put climate change at the top of our diplomatic agenda. This is especially true when it comes to our relationship with China. Our two large nations share the title of top consumers of energy and the biggest polluters on earth.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 25, 2003
CANBERRA, Australia - Chinese President Hu Jintao addressed Australia's Parliament yesterday, a privilege accorded to him just one day after President Bush, and a juxtaposition almost inconceivable even a year ago in a nation long fearful of China. Hu officially laid out in his speech what has become obvious: that Australia's natural resources, particularly oil and gas, are playing a critical role in fueling China's fast-growing economy. But in his parliamentary appearance, Hu went beyond economics by painting China as an all-around global player that was reaching out for broad diplomatic and cultural relations, including an increase in the already tens of thousands of Chinese students attending Australian universities.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2007
PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA -- Chinese President Hu Jintao pledged to boost his country's booming relationship with Africa yesterday, as he brought a 12-day Africa tour to the continent's economic powerhouse. Hu's trip, in which he has lavished promises of economic partnership on a half-dozen nations but steered clear of controversial political issues, has become a symbol of China's intense courtship of Africa. The growing relationship has been viewed with trepidation by many in the West. U.S. officials, who see Africa as an alternative source of oil to the Middle East, are worried particularly about competition with China for the continent's resources.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 22, 2006
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- Chinese President Hu Jintao told an audience at Yale University yesterday that China's rapid economic development is not a threat to the United States and that the two countries' shared strategic interests should inevitably make them partners. Yale was his last stop on a four-day visit to the United States meant to quell Washington's concerns about China's growing trade surplus and increased political muscle, as well as to build business ties. His speech to an audience of about 600 students and professors was also broadcast live in China except for a brief question-and-answer session in which Hu was queried about whether China views the United States as an ally or adversary, and if China's economic development comes at the cost of political rights.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 21, 2004
MACAU - China's president, Hu Jintao, publicly urged Hong Kong's leader yesterday to improve his management of the semiautonomous Chinese territory, a comment widely seen as a rebuke. In an unscheduled event at the end of a two-day visit here, Hu abruptly stepped forward while being photographed with Tung Chee-hwa, Hong Kong's chief executive, and other Hong Kong officials. Turning and standing in front of Tung, Hu started by saying that he believed Hong Kong was "moving in the right direction."
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 21, 2004
BEIJING - Behind the choreographed withdrawal of Jiang Zemin from China's central leadership Sunday was the government's attempt to display a maturing Communist Party completing its first orderly transfer of power. By voluntarily handing control of the military, to President Hu Jintao, Jiang may have signaled the end of an era. But the behind-the-scenes maneuvering that preceded Jiang's departure from his last major post illustrated something much different: a political system still trapped in the opaque, Kremlin-style intriguing of a bygone era. The Communist Party of China is building a bureaucracy to run the country and writing rules by which to govern it, but all the key decisions continue to be made behind an impenetrable shroud.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 2003
BEIJING - China named a new president yesterday in an election that was richer in symbolism than political significance. The new president is Hu Jintao, 60, who already has the more powerful position of leader of the Communist Party. But that does not automatically mean Hu is the most powerful man in China. That probably remains Jiang Zemin, even after handing over the presidency to Hu yesterday and the party chief's position to him in November. Jiang, 76, retains another important job as head of the commission that runs the military, but titles don't necessarily mean much in China.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 18, 2007
BEIJING -- A rare open letter signed by 17 former top officials and conservative Marxist scholars before a key Communist Party meeting accuses China's top leaders of steering the country in the wrong direction, pandering to foreigners, betraying the workers' revolution and jeopardizing social stability. "We're going down an evil road," said the letter posted on the Web site Mao Zedong's Flag. "The whole country is at a most precarious time." The challenge is unusual both for the importance of its signatories and for its timing during the time leading up to this fall's Party Congress -- an event held once every five years and a key date on the political calendar.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2007
PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA -- Chinese President Hu Jintao pledged to boost his country's booming relationship with Africa yesterday, as he brought a 12-day Africa tour to the continent's economic powerhouse. Hu's trip, in which he has lavished promises of economic partnership on a half-dozen nations but steered clear of controversial political issues, has become a symbol of China's intense courtship of Africa. The growing relationship has been viewed with trepidation by many in the West. U.S. officials, who see Africa as an alternative source of oil to the Middle East, are worried particularly about competition with China for the continent's resources.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2006
BEIJING -- The number of "mass incidents" in China, a reference to protests, riots and other forms of social unrest, fell by one-fifth in the first nine months of 2006, according to Chinese government statistics released yesterday. The official New China News Agency reported that police dealt with 17,900 disturbances during the January-September period, a drop of 22.1 percent, quoting Liu Jinguo, a vice minister of the nation's Ministry of Public Security. At the same time, Liu also warned that unapproved religious groups have been gaining in numbers and influence.
NEWS
By BONNIE S. GLASER | April 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- No agreements were signed, there was no substantial narrowing of differences in any of the knotty issues discussed and no benchmarks established to measure future progress. Yet the summit between President Bush and Chinese President Hu Jintao should not be condemned as a failure. U.S.-China relations are complex, and existing problems don't lend themselves to quick solutions. A close read of the pre-summit meetings, the presidential toasts and speeches and official read-outs provides reasons to judge last week's summit a modest success.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2006
As President Hu Jintao of China made his first state visit to Saudi Arabia yesterday, his arrival in Riyadh offered the latest sign of shifting winds across the oil-rich Persian Gulf region: China has grown as a major market for oil, and Arab states have begun turning to it as an alternative to the United States and Europe in other areas. "We are opening new channels; we are heading east," said Prince Walid bin Talal, a billionaire investor and member of the royal family. "China is a big consumer of oil. Saudi Arabia needs to open new channels beyond the West.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 22, 2006
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- Chinese President Hu Jintao told an audience at Yale University yesterday that China's rapid economic development is not a threat to the United States and that the two countries' shared strategic interests should inevitably make them partners. Yale was his last stop on a four-day visit to the United States meant to quell Washington's concerns about China's growing trade surplus and increased political muscle, as well as to build business ties. His speech to an audience of about 600 students and professors was also broadcast live in China except for a brief question-and-answer session in which Hu was queried about whether China views the United States as an ally or adversary, and if China's economic development comes at the cost of political rights.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2004
BEIJING - More than a year after becoming China's president, Hu Jintao was handed the full reins of power yesterday when his predecessor, Jiang Zemin, gave up the nation's most powerful military post. The move ends an awkward power-sharing arrangement that has seen two rival camps maneuvering for position as China faces a number of major foreign and domestic policy challenges, such as relations with Taiwan, North Korea's nuclear program, government corruption and rapid economic growth.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 15, 2002
BEIJING - The Communist Party of China ushered in a new, younger generation of leaders this morning by naming Hu Jintao as the party's general secretary, succeeding Jiang Zemin, and appointing Hu and eight other men as members of the committee responsible for steering the nation. Long expected, Hu's ascension marks the first transition of leadership in Communist China without death, purges or turmoil. Jiang became general secretary in 1989 after the bloody crackdown at Tiananmen Square and the purging of a reformist predecessor.
NEWS
By PAUL RICHTER and PAUL RICHTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Chinese President Hu Jintao promised President Bush long-term economic reforms yesterday but offered no immediate concessions on the trade and security issues that threaten the two countries' relationship. Hailed with a 21-gun salute on a sunlit White House lawn, Hu declared that China was committed to overhauling gradually the export-driven economy that has piled up a $202 billion trade surplus with the United States and brought calls in Congress for protectionist retaliation.
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