Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHsh Associates
IN THE NEWS

Hsh Associates

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Patricia Rivera | January 18, 2004
Experts say choosing an adjustable-rate mortgage vs. one with a fixed rate should focus mainly on how long the buyer plans to stay in a house. If the buyer might be transferred regularly, an adjustable mortgage probably makes more sense than a long-term, fixed-rate mortgage. A buyer who doesn't expect to live in the home for 10 years also should consider an adjustable rate, experts said. HSH Associates offers the following example: The monthly payment on a $200,000, fixed-rate, 30-year mortgage at 6 percent would be $1,199.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | August 22, 2007
In this topsy-turvy lending environment, Wall Street is suddenly lumping purchasers of expensive homes together with low-income, shaky-credit homebuyers as risks to avoid. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the large government-backed companies that purchase mortgages, don't buy so-called "jumbo" loans above $417,000. That wasn't a problem in the past, but now investors spooked by turmoil in the lending industry have decided that they don't want to buy jumbo loans either. The result? Just ask Barry R. Glazer.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | November 7, 1993
It didn't last long.Three months ago, rates on 30-year fixed mortgages dropped below 7 percent for the first time in a quarter-century. Last week, they spiked back up.Some in the real estate industry said increased rates -- still considered low enough to attract homebuyers -- should have little effect on the housing market. But others said the rise above 7 percent likely would push fence-sitters to refinance or buy a house, especially first-time buyers.They also disagreed on whether rates had hit bottom.
BUSINESS
By Carolyn Bigda and Carolyn Bigda,Tribune Media services | July 29, 2007
Need to sell your home in a hurry? Unfortunately, for most homeowners today it's no longer as simple as putting a "for sale" sign in the yard. Existing-home sales have fallen, and prices have declined, too, as the number for sale has risen. It's not an easy time to be a seller. There is too much supply for the demand. But roughly 40 million people move every year in the United States, according to the Census Bureau. Young professionals may be inclined to change their home address because of job transfers, marriage (or divorce)
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
Your 401(k) may have crashed. Your stock portfolio may still be in a nose dive. But if you're looking for a mortgage today - as one analyst said - "you've got a giant smile on your face." Out of the gloom of a plummeting stock market, Freddie Mac reported that the average interest rate for a 30-year mortgage dropped to 6.34 percent yesterday, the lowest in the 31 years it has been issuing its weekly survey. "In terms of mortgage rates, the last time they were this good was when Jimi Hendrix was coming out with his first album," said Robert Van Order, chief international economist for the federally chartered company that supplies lenders with funds by purchasing mortgages.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | August 1, 1993
Another refinancing boomlet has been slow to arrive, but it seems to finally be here."A lot of people who were sitting on the fence decided to come in and do something," said Keith W. Stackhouse, president of Atlantic Residential Mortgage Corp., a Bank of Baltimore subsidiary."Many homeowners are perceiving that interest rates bottomed out a few weeks ago and have started to move up, and that if they're going to catch the refinance wave, they should catch it now."Refinancings peaked in March, then slowed, but lenders said last week inquiries have begun to pick up slightly once again.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1998
Here is a partial list of local and national real estate Web sites by organization, Web address and comment.Real estate brokersCentury 21, www.century21.com: Property searches, community descriptions, mortgage and credit information.Coldwell Banker Grempler Realty Inc., www.grempler.com: Mortgage rates, agent home pages, and home searches.Homebuyer, www.homebuyer.com: Offers information on residential and commercial properties as well as loan, title, mortgage, home inspection and insurance information.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1995
Home sales in the Baltimore region remained on an upswing in October, jumping 14 percent over year-ago figures, the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors said yesterday.The number of new and existing home sales in Baltimore City and Baltimore, Howard, Harford and Carroll counties climbed to 1,607 from 1,406 in the corresponding period last year, the board reported.The housing market had emerged from a 14-month slump in September, when sales rose 11 percent. For several months, a rising number of homes have gone under contract, signaling that stronger settled sales would follow.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | December 10, 1995
WASHINGTON-- Thoughts of sugar plums and holiday cheer may be dancing through your head this month, but top economists suggest that you pause to focus on something that could save you a lot of money: The mortgage-refinancing boom that's shaping up for early 1996.Some analysts argue that a refinancing boom already is in progress. They cite data from the latest Mortgage Bankers Association of America loan application index showing that nearly 40 percent of new loans currently being taken out are for refinancings of existing mortgages -- twice the normal rate, and nearly five times what it was in early 1995.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | September 9, 2001
If you were gambling that 30-year fixed-rate mortgages were heading toward the 6.5 percent mark, you may not want to bet the house on it happening just yet. Although mortgages in the Baltimore metropolitan area have slowly declined to some of their lowest levels since February 1999, mortgage industry experts are warning consumers that rates may be bottoming out and ready to move higher. The average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage in the Baltimore area was 7.01 percent last week, up from 6.95 percent the previous week, according to HSH Associates Inc., a New Jersey company that tracks and analyzes mortgages.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2005
As soon as the for-sale sign went up in their neighborhood, Bryan and Danielle Lopez knew immediately that was the house they wanted. Figuring out the type of mortgage to get was another matter. The Sparks couple initially leaned toward a traditional 30-year fixed-rate loan. But after weighing their cash flow, how long they plan to live in the house and the fact they have a baby on the way, the pair chose an interest-only loan. By paying only the interest on the 6 percent loan for the first seven years, the couple's monthly payment will be $200 less than if they went with the traditional fixed-rate loan.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Rivera | January 18, 2004
Experts say choosing an adjustable-rate mortgage vs. one with a fixed rate should focus mainly on how long the buyer plans to stay in a house. If the buyer might be transferred regularly, an adjustable mortgage probably makes more sense than a long-term, fixed-rate mortgage. A buyer who doesn't expect to live in the home for 10 years also should consider an adjustable rate, experts said. HSH Associates offers the following example: The monthly payment on a $200,000, fixed-rate, 30-year mortgage at 6 percent would be $1,199.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
Your 401(k) may have crashed. Your stock portfolio may still be in a nose dive. But if you're looking for a mortgage today - as one analyst said - "you've got a giant smile on your face." Out of the gloom of a plummeting stock market, Freddie Mac reported that the average interest rate for a 30-year mortgage dropped to 6.34 percent yesterday, the lowest in the 31 years it has been issuing its weekly survey. "In terms of mortgage rates, the last time they were this good was when Jimi Hendrix was coming out with his first album," said Robert Van Order, chief international economist for the federally chartered company that supplies lenders with funds by purchasing mortgages.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | July 7, 2002
Well, here we go again. If you happened to miss the refinance opportunities of 1993, 1998 and 2001, the mortgage markets are giving you -- as well as borrowers looking to purchase a home -- another opportunity. Mortgage rates are bottoming out once again. But not only is the old war horse -- the 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage -- hovering around and even dipping below 6.5 percent, but those adjustable rate mortgages are becoming so tantalizingly low that people in fixed rates might just want to take a look to see whether they can better their financial circumstances.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | December 30, 2001
In life, it's been said that timing is everything. For those looking for a mortgage or hoping to refinance an existing loan at a rate somewhere well below 7 percent, the time has come and gone. And if the experts are right, don't expect those bargain-basement rates to come back soon. With expectations that the stage is being set for an economic recovery in the new year, the weekly Freddie Mac average for a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage has seen a steady climb back over the 7 percent benchmark from its low point of 6.45 percent, just seven weeks ago. For the federally chartered company that supplies lenders with funds by purchasing mortgages, the dip on Nov. 8, fueled by the aftermath of Sept.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | September 9, 2001
If you were gambling that 30-year fixed-rate mortgages were heading toward the 6.5 percent mark, you may not want to bet the house on it happening just yet. Although mortgages in the Baltimore metropolitan area have slowly declined to some of their lowest levels since February 1999, mortgage industry experts are warning consumers that rates may be bottoming out and ready to move higher. The average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage in the Baltimore area was 7.01 percent last week, up from 6.95 percent the previous week, according to HSH Associates Inc., a New Jersey company that tracks and analyzes mortgages.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
Baltimore-area home mortgage rates reached their highest level in almost two years yesterday, hurting consumers' ability to buy houses and surging perilously close to a range that could threaten Maryland's already fragile economic recovery.In just the past four days, the average area rate for a 30-year loan jumped a "completely crazy" 0.37 percentage points, to 8.50 percent yesterday, said Paul Havemann of HSH Associates, a firm that tracks mortgage rates nationally. That rate was last seen here in June 1992.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
Baltimore-area home mortgage rates reached their highest level in almost two years yesterday, hurting consumers' ability to buy houses and surging perilously close to a range that could threaten Maryland's already fragile economic recovery.In just the last four days, the average Baltimore-area rate for a 30-year loan jumped a "completely crazy" 0.37 percentage points, to 8.50 percent yesterday, said Paul Havemann of HSH Associates, a firm that tracks mortgage rates nationally. That rate was last seen here in June 1992.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | April 22, 2001
Admit it. You were psyched. For a couple of weeks, you've been "floating" your mortgage interest rate, hoping to time it just right to lock in and get the best possible rate offered by your lender. Then, around 11 a.m. Wednesday, it happens. The Federal Reserve surprises everyone with a half-percentage-point cut in the overnight lending rate. The Dow Jones industrial average zooms up 400 points. The Nasdaq soars 156 points. Your battered 401(k) starts to look a whole lot better. You pat yourself on the back and call your loan officer, expecting him to tell you that the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage has followed suit and has dropped from 7.5 percent to 7 percent, in a similar Fed-like reduction.
NEWS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
If Jon and Susan Hartman had procrastinated a few weeks more, they might have been packing in their dreams, instead of packing for their new home."It was horrible to watch," Susan Hartman said. "Each time the interest rates go up, you can afford less house." Luckily, last month the Hartmans found a home in Ulmstead Estates, just off the Magothy River in Anne Arundel County. They had counted on a fixed-rate mortgage, but with rates inching closer to 9 percent, a lower rate adjustable rate mortgage made more sense.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.