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NEWS
February 22, 2010
As a current female student at a local university where almost 30 percent of the students smoke, Thomas H. Maugh's article "Study: Smoking adds risk for HPV-linked head, neck tumors" (Feb. 16) caught my attention by attributing the human papillomavirus (HPV) to a number of tumors in the heads and necks of patients, as well as linking these tumors to patients who were current or former tobacco users. HPV is a common virus that is passed on through genital contact, most often during sex. There is a vaccine that prevents about 70 percent of the 40 types of HPV that cause most cases of cervical cancer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 1, 2013
Doctors and patients alike are often uncomfortable talking about sexual health and sexually transmitted disease. But a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows that this squeamishness costs society millions of dollars spent trying to treat or cure diseases that could have been prevented, vaccinated against, screened for or detected at an earlier stage of development. According to the CDC, about 19 million Americans each year are affected by sexually transmitted diseases and infections.
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NEWS
By Arthur Allen | February 8, 2007
Sometimes, good policy is a question of good timing. The human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine - which Texas required for its sixth-grade girls last week, and which state legislatures around the country, including Maryland's, have been considering - is a good case in point. By all accounts, the new vaccine against cervical cancer, developed by Merck Co., can provide an important advance in health. In scientific trials, it proved 100 percent effective in preventing infections with the two types of HPV that cause 70 percent of the 3,500 deaths by cervical cancer in this country every year.
HEALTH
Susan Reimer | September 22, 2011
The kerfuffle between Republican presidential candidates Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry over the HPV vaccination, administered to young girls in order to prevent cervical cancer later in life, is the perfect example of why you might not want a politician to be your pediatrician. During a debate last week in Tampa, Bachmann described the vaccination, which Perry attempted to make mandatory in Texas where he is governor, as a "government injection" and "a violation of a liberty interest.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 3, 2007
Iwrote a column recently advocating the vaccination of our daughters against human papilloma virus, a sexually transmitted disease that can cause genital warts and, years later, cause cervical cancer. The response to the column was passionate, as you might imagine. Readers objected to everything from the unknown long-term effects of the drug to the unseemly role of Merck, the company that makes the vaccine, in urging it on the public. Readers recalled the record of pharmaceutical companies with drugs such as hormone replacement therapy, Vioxx and Fen-Phen, which were thought to be helpful when introduced but were found, over time, to be harmful.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | May 11, 2006
With conservative opposition softening, scientists say a vaccine that could eliminate most cases of cervical cancer appears headed toward government approval for girls as young as 9. The Food and Drug Administration is expected to decide next month whether to grant a license to Merck & Co., which hopes to market the vaccine against the human papilloma virus (HPV). The sexually transmitted virus triggers both cervical cancer and genital warts. If approved, it would become the first vaccine designed specifically to prevent a form of cancer.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1995
MedImmune, a Gaithersburg-based medical technology company, says it plans to proceed with human trials of a promising vaccine it is developing for a sexually transmitted virus that can cause cervical cancer in women.The company has targeted the human papillomavirus, or HPV, which causes cervical cancer if untreated. Men are considered carriers of the virus, though in rare cases they develop genital cancer from the virus.If MedImmune is successful in getting its vaccine approved in the United States and overseas, company executives expect to market the drug to a vast audience -- perhaps all women who are sexually active.
NEWS
March 20, 2007
Long-term impact of vaccine unknown I think Susan Reimer should give parents who question the use of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to prevent cervical cancer more credit ("Give daughters a shot at avoiding cervical cancer," March 13). Ms. Reimer assumes that the real reason parents would object to having their daughters receive the HPV vaccine is that they think it would encourage sexual promiscuity. I disagree with her assumption. I have three daughters (ages 20, 22 and 24)
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | April 14, 2008
The sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer in women has now been linked to an uptick of throat, tonsil and tongue cancers - in a younger and healthier group of patients than doctors have ever seen before. These head and neck cancers were once the scourge of older men - mostly the result of lifetimes of heavy smoking and drinking. The treatments often left victims disfigured. But with those cases on the decline, doctors are seeing a new group of victims. They're men in their 40s, and even 30s, whose cancer is brought on by the increasingly common human papillomavirus (HPV)
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | November 15, 2006
Digene Corp. announced yesterday that Daryl J. Faulkner, a biotech industry veteran, will take over as chief executive next month. Faulkner replaces the Gaithersburg company's current CEO, Evan L. Jones, who surprised colleagues and industry insiders this summer by detailing plans to retire just as the business was taking off. "There's a little sadness on my part; it's been incredible building Digene," Jones, 50, said yesterday. He took over the struggling biotechnology company in July 1990, when it had just been downsized to about 30 people, had no cash to speak of and sales of less than $1 million.
NEWS
February 22, 2010
As a current female student at a local university where almost 30 percent of the students smoke, Thomas H. Maugh's article "Study: Smoking adds risk for HPV-linked head, neck tumors" (Feb. 16) caught my attention by attributing the human papillomavirus (HPV) to a number of tumors in the heads and necks of patients, as well as linking these tumors to patients who were current or former tobacco users. HPV is a common virus that is passed on through genital contact, most often during sex. There is a vaccine that prevents about 70 percent of the 40 types of HPV that cause most cases of cervical cancer.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | April 14, 2008
The sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer in women has now been linked to an uptick of throat, tonsil and tongue cancers - in a younger and healthier group of patients than doctors have ever seen before. These head and neck cancers were once the scourge of older men - mostly the result of lifetimes of heavy smoking and drinking. The treatments often left victims disfigured. But with those cases on the decline, doctors are seeing a new group of victims. They're men in their 40s, and even 30s, whose cancer is brought on by the increasingly common human papillomavirus (HPV)
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 3, 2007
Iwrote a column recently advocating the vaccination of our daughters against human papilloma virus, a sexually transmitted disease that can cause genital warts and, years later, cause cervical cancer. The response to the column was passionate, as you might imagine. Readers objected to everything from the unknown long-term effects of the drug to the unseemly role of Merck, the company that makes the vaccine, in urging it on the public. Readers recalled the record of pharmaceutical companies with drugs such as hormone replacement therapy, Vioxx and Fen-Phen, which were thought to be helpful when introduced but were found, over time, to be harmful.
NEWS
March 20, 2007
Long-term impact of vaccine unknown I think Susan Reimer should give parents who question the use of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to prevent cervical cancer more credit ("Give daughters a shot at avoiding cervical cancer," March 13). Ms. Reimer assumes that the real reason parents would object to having their daughters receive the HPV vaccine is that they think it would encourage sexual promiscuity. I disagree with her assumption. I have three daughters (ages 20, 22 and 24)
NEWS
By Arthur Allen | February 8, 2007
Sometimes, good policy is a question of good timing. The human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine - which Texas required for its sixth-grade girls last week, and which state legislatures around the country, including Maryland's, have been considering - is a good case in point. By all accounts, the new vaccine against cervical cancer, developed by Merck Co., can provide an important advance in health. In scientific trials, it proved 100 percent effective in preventing infections with the two types of HPV that cause 70 percent of the 3,500 deaths by cervical cancer in this country every year.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | November 15, 2006
Digene Corp. announced yesterday that Daryl J. Faulkner, a biotech industry veteran, will take over as chief executive next month. Faulkner replaces the Gaithersburg company's current CEO, Evan L. Jones, who surprised colleagues and industry insiders this summer by detailing plans to retire just as the business was taking off. "There's a little sadness on my part; it's been incredible building Digene," Jones, 50, said yesterday. He took over the struggling biotechnology company in July 1990, when it had just been downsized to about 30 people, had no cash to speak of and sales of less than $1 million.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
Doctors and patients alike are often uncomfortable talking about sexual health and sexually transmitted disease. But a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows that this squeamishness costs society millions of dollars spent trying to treat or cure diseases that could have been prevented, vaccinated against, screened for or detected at an earlier stage of development. According to the CDC, about 19 million Americans each year are affected by sexually transmitted diseases and infections.
HEALTH
Susan Reimer | September 22, 2011
The kerfuffle between Republican presidential candidates Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry over the HPV vaccination, administered to young girls in order to prevent cervical cancer later in life, is the perfect example of why you might not want a politician to be your pediatrician. During a debate last week in Tampa, Bachmann described the vaccination, which Perry attempted to make mandatory in Texas where he is governor, as a "government injection" and "a violation of a liberty interest.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | May 11, 2006
With conservative opposition softening, scientists say a vaccine that could eliminate most cases of cervical cancer appears headed toward government approval for girls as young as 9. The Food and Drug Administration is expected to decide next month whether to grant a license to Merck & Co., which hopes to market the vaccine against the human papilloma virus (HPV). The sexually transmitted virus triggers both cervical cancer and genital warts. If approved, it would become the first vaccine designed specifically to prevent a form of cancer.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1995
MedImmune, a Gaithersburg-based medical technology company, says it plans to proceed with human trials of a promising vaccine it is developing for a sexually transmitted virus that can cause cervical cancer in women.The company has targeted the human papillomavirus, or HPV, which causes cervical cancer if untreated. Men are considered carriers of the virus, though in rare cases they develop genital cancer from the virus.If MedImmune is successful in getting its vaccine approved in the United States and overseas, company executives expect to market the drug to a vast audience -- perhaps all women who are sexually active.
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