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BUSINESS
By Mara H. Gottfried and Mara H. Gottfried,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 15, 2000
Gaithersburg-based Digene Corp. said yesterday that it has come to an agreement with Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings to use its HPV test, which helps detect cervical cancer in women. Vandana K. Bapna, a biotechnology analyst at Hunt Valley-based Offutt Securities, called the deal significant for Digene, a biotechnology company that focuses on DNA and RNA technology for the detection, screening and monitoring of sexually transmitted diseases. "LabCorp is one of the largest reference testing labs in the United States," Bapna said.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | July 31, 2012
Women will have access to free health services for certain procedures under health care reform that go into affect tomorrow. The health benefits, a result of the Mikulski Women's Preventive Health Amendment, guarantee that women will receive, at no cost, an annual women's health exam to screen for the leading causes of death among women. It also requires all health plans to cover comprehensive women's preventive care and screenings with no copayments. Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski joined other Congressional Democrats Tuesday in announcing the new services.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | June 4, 2007
Facing increased competition for its main product - the HPV Test - and questions about its plans for growth, Gaithersburg's Digene Corp. agreed yesterday to be acquired by a foreign company in a $1.6 billion cash and stock deal designed to boost the local biotech firm's international sales effort and speed technology development. Under the agreement, Netherlands-based Qiagen N.V. would pay $61.25 for Digene shares - up to $880 million - on a first-come, first-served basis. That represents a 37 percent premium over Digene's $44.77 closing price Friday on the Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,sun reporter | June 5, 2007
Dutch company Qiagen NV likely agreed to buy Gaithersburg's Digene Corp. over the weekend in a $1.6 billion deal for one main reason: to get its hands on the local company's HPV Test, which detects a cancer-causing virus. The acquisition puts Qiagen at the forefront of what analysts are calling one of the hottest areas in biotechnology. Known as molecular diagnostics, it is a relatively new discipline that uses genetic and protein information to better diagnose infectious diseases and cancer or predispositions toward them.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
The women's faces flash by, their expressions shifting from earnest to bewildered to confident. "Why didn't I know that?" one of them asks. "Everyone we know should know," says another. The commercial, launched this month by Gaithersburg-based Digene Corp., shows five women in their 30s, in what appears to be a New York-style loft. The ad implies that their regular gynecological routines are not enough. Women might be imperiling themselves, it suggests, if they don't use Digene's test for human papillomavirus, the sexually transmitted virus known as HPV. "If your Pap test is normal, you don't have to worry about cervical cancer, right?"
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2000
Digene Corp., the Gaithersburg-based maker of medical test kits, announced yesterday that Kaiser Permanente will use its flagship product to screen for cervical cancer. The 10-year-old company's Digital Hybrid Capture HPV test detects the human papillomavirus, a frequent precursor to cervical cancer. The HPV test is one of a handful of products Digene is developing, but it's the most successful so far, said Digene President Charles Fleischman. The test played prominently in Digene's earnings for the quarter ended March 31, which the company also released yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2002
Digene Corp. said yesterday that it paid Abbott Laboratories $2.5 million in stock to reacquire the rights to diagnostic tests for two sexually transmitted diseases. The Gaithersburg company said that getting back the rights to its chlamydia and gonorrhea tests eventually will allow it to "bundle" them with its HPV test for cervical cancer. The move ultimately may increase both revenue for the company and convenience for women, allowing all three tests to be run from one patient sample.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
Digene Corp. said yesterday that strong U.S. sales of its cervical cancer tests drove quarterly revenue up 47 percent, but that costs from a scuttled secondary offering resulted in a loss equal to that of a year ago. The Gaithersburg company lost $1.6 million, or 10 cents per share, for its fiscal third quarter this year and last. The loss this year included about $500,000 - or 3 cents per share - in expenses related to an offering Digene pulled during the market slump in March. Analysts had predicted a loss of 9 cents per share, excluding the one-time costs, according to the average estimate of three analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research Inc. Quarterly revenue was $9 million, compared with $6.1 million a year ago. "It's pretty hard to be negative," said H. C. Wainright analyst Ronald Opel, who upgraded shares of Digene from an "accumulate" rating to a "buy" in March.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1999
Digene Corp. said yesterday that the Food and Drug Administration has approved use of its second-generation test for a common sexually transmitted disease as a follow-up to determine if women with inconclusive Pap smear results are at risk for cervical cancer.The test approved yesterday, said company officials, is a marked improvement over its currently available screening for human papillomavirus because it detects all HPV types. There are 70 HPV types; 13 are known to cause cancer.As with the Beltsville-based company's first-generation test, approved by the FDA in 1997, the new HPV test was approved by the regulator only for use as a follow-up to abnormal Pap smear results, which are considered "inconclusive" or "borderline."
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2002
Shares of Digene Corp. fell 19 percent yesterday after the Gaithersburg company announced that this year's revenue will fall below expectations because its agreement with the world's biggest maker of diagnostic tests failed to produce the expected sales for its human papillomavirus test. The company's revenue for the fiscal year that ended June 30 will be $48.5 million to $49 million, according to preliminary figures. Digene had expected revenue of $51 million for the year. Digene will report final results next month.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | June 4, 2007
Facing increased competition for its main product - the HPV Test - and questions about its plans for growth, Gaithersburg's Digene Corp. agreed yesterday to be acquired by a foreign company in a $1.6 billion cash and stock deal designed to boost the local biotech firm's international sales effort and speed technology development. Under the agreement, Netherlands-based Qiagen N.V. would pay $61.25 for Digene shares - up to $880 million - on a first-come, first-served basis. That represents a 37 percent premium over Digene's $44.77 closing price Friday on the Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | January 21, 2007
With a new vaccine on the market to prevent it and multimillion-dollar advertising campaigns highlighting it, the cervical-cancer-causing human papillomavirus - or HPV - might be the most talked-about sexually transmitted disease since HIV. Yet a seven-year-old test designed to detect its most dangerous strains in women still isn't used in 4 out of the 5 gynecological exams it's approved for, according to Digene Corp., the Gaithersburg company that makes the test. And the recent attention to the virus has led other women to request the test when it isn't right for them.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
The women's faces flash by, their expressions shifting from earnest to bewildered to confident. "Why didn't I know that?" one of them asks. "Everyone we know should know," says another. The commercial, launched this month by Gaithersburg-based Digene Corp., shows five women in their 30s, in what appears to be a New York-style loft. The ad implies that their regular gynecological routines are not enough. Women might be imperiling themselves, it suggests, if they don't use Digene's test for human papillomavirus, the sexually transmitted virus known as HPV. "If your Pap test is normal, you don't have to worry about cervical cancer, right?"
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
Digene Corp. said yesterday that it will pay Enzo Biochem Inc. at least $30.5 million to settle a long-standing patent dispute involving technology used in its premier product, a test for human papillomavirus, or HPV. The virus is the primary cause of cervical cancer. Digene's HPV test is winning widespread acceptance as a screening tool in conjunction with the traditional Pap smear. The company reported HPV test sales grew 46 percent last year to $74.5 million. Gaithersburg-based Digene said settlement of the lawsuit, which had been pending in U.S. District Court in Delaware, will allow the company to focus on its future.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 1, 2003
Shares of Digene Corp. climbed 20 percent yesterday after a physicians' association said women 30 and older should be tested for cervical cancer using an advanced test made by Digene. Women in that age group should get Pap smears and be screened with newer tests to detect the human papillomavirus, or HPV, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists said on its Web site. Digene, based in Gaithersburg, is the only company with an HPV test approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2003
After 13 years of losses, Digene Corp. said yesterday that it is poised to turn a profit, though a small one, for the first time next quarter, an important milestone for investors in the Gaithersburg-based medical diagnostics company. The profit was forecast as the company reported that its third-quarter loss narrowed to $600,000, or 3 cents a share, compared with a loss of $3.3 million, or 19 cents a share, in the third quarter of last year. The company's fiscal year ends June 30. In a conference call, Digene executives told analysts that they expect fourth-quarter results to fall between break-even and a profit of $600,000, setting the stage for a fiscal 2004 profit of "at least" $6.5 million, or about 35 cents a share.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
The Food and Drug Administration plans to approve a Maryland-based company's highly specific test for the human papilloma virus, which is associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer, for marketing in the United States.A spokeswoman for the FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health, the arm that regulates medical devices and diagnostics, said yesterday that Gaithersburg-based Oncor Inc. was notified in a May 13 letter that its test merited approval subject to final labeling and inspection requirements.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2000
Digene Corp. said yesterday that the United Kingdom will use its HPV test, which helps detect cervical cancer in women, in a pilot program for its national screening program. Company officials and analysts said the announcement is a major boon for the company, and investors agreed. Shares of Digene rose $5.8125, or 15 percent, to close at $39.875 yesterday. "It's a big step forward for the company," said Vandana K. Bapna, biotechnology equity analyst with Hunt Valley-based Offutt Securities Inc. "It could start a chain reaction where other national governments might be encouraged to adopt the test."
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2002
Shares of Digene Corp. fell 19 percent yesterday after the Gaithersburg company announced that this year's revenue will fall below expectations because its agreement with the world's biggest maker of diagnostic tests failed to produce the expected sales for its human papillomavirus test. The company's revenue for the fiscal year that ended June 30 will be $48.5 million to $49 million, according to preliminary figures. Digene had expected revenue of $51 million for the year. Digene will report final results next month.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
The Federal Trade Commission announced yesterday that it would seek a court injunction to block Digene Corp.'s acquisition by fellow diagnostic testing company Cytyc Corp., dealing the proposed merger a possibly lethal blow. The FTC, which is charged with ensuring fair competition, said in a statement that the combination would lead to reduced competition and increased prices for cervical cancer screening. The panel voted 5-0 to seek the court order. "This merger as proposed raises serious competitive concerns within the highly concentrated market for this important diagnostic tool," said Joseph J. Simons, director of the Bureau of Competition, referring to cervical cancer tests.
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