Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHoyt Wilhelm
IN THE NEWS

Hoyt Wilhelm

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Aug. 23, 1978: In a swap of running backs, the Baltimore Colts send holdout Lydell Mitchell, their career rushing leader, to the San Diego Chargers for oft-injured Joe Washington. In his three seasons here, Washington will gain nearly 4,000 combined rushing and receiving yards, lead the NFL with 82 receptions in 1979 and make the Pro Bowl. Aug. 24, 1969: Australia's Rod "The Rocket" Laver defeats Pancho Gonzalez, 41, in five sets to win the men's title in the Baltimore Country Club Grass Court Pro Tennis Tournament.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Aug. 23, 1978: In a swap of running backs, the Baltimore Colts send holdout Lydell Mitchell, their career rushing leader, to the San Diego Chargers for oft-injured Joe Washington. In his three seasons here, Washington will gain nearly 4,000 combined rushing and receiving yards, lead the NFL with 82 receptions in 1979 and make the Pro Bowl. Aug. 24, 1969: Australia's Rod "The Rocket" Laver defeats Pancho Gonzalez, 41, in five sets to win the men's title in the Baltimore Country Club Grass Court Pro Tennis Tournament.
Advertisement
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 20, 2002
ON SUNDAY, the Baltimore Orioles inducted Hoyt Wilhelm into their Hall of Fame. Some of us still remember the day Wilhelm no-hit the New York Yankees. It was 1958. The day was overcast. Gus Triandos hit a home run. Billy Gardner, cheek bursting with chewing tobacco, caught the last out. Some of us remember the details because we were still kids back then. To watch a baseball game is to gain entrance to childhood for a few hours at a time. But the ballplayers are about to kill off a whole generation of the young at heart if they go through with their insane talk of a labor strike Aug. 30. What the players don't seem to understand is this: We have other things on our minds now. Not only football games, not only kids returning to school, and terrorist nightmare worries and the fate of our diminishing 401(k)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | September 20, 2008
Jersey drenched, rain dripping off the bill of his cap, Hoyt Wilhelm kicked nervously at the mound. "Jeez," the Orioles pitcher muttered, weighing the gravity of the moment. "Oh, jeez." Wilhelm peered through the slop for the sign. As if it mattered. More than 18,000 fans at Memorial Stadium on Sept. 20, 1958, knew the knuckleball was coming. For 8 2/3 innings on a dreary Saturday afternoon in Baltimore, Wilhelm's butterfly pitch had fooled New York's American League champions. Now one batter, the Yankees' ornery Hank Bauer, stood between the Orioles and history.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
One of Orioles manager Johnny Oates' first duties yesterday was to calm the nerves of catcher Chris Hoiles.Hoiles hadn't done anything wrong. In fact, his hot bat led Oates to bat Hoiles in the cleanup spot for the first time this year."
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
He's not pitching any longer, not throwing that devilishly fluttering knuckleball, but as he nears his 72nd birthday, Hoyt Wilhelm still is in baseball.Wilhelm didn't reach the major leagues until he was 28, but lasted 21 years, until he was 49, and wound up in the Hall of Fame in 1985 based primarily on his relief record of 124-103 and 227 saves. To put his longevity into perspective, he made the National League All-Star team in 1953 with the New York Giants and a final time 17 years later with the Atlanta Braves at 47.You see, the knuckleball, which he threw 90 percent of the time, doesn't take as much out of an arm as fastballs and curves.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | April 5, 1999
IT IS time, as the last baseball season of the 1900s begins, to put together the Baltimore team of the century. That is, a lineup of the best players to have pitched, batted and fielded in this city's behalf.Such a project could be carried out in committee of the whole (48,876 seating capacity) ballpark, or by any one centenarian. The ensuing argument could carry us into the 2000s.Rules: to be eligible, a nominee must have played at least one full, pennant-standings inning for a Baltimore team in the American, Federal, Negro or International leagues, in the 1900s (sorry, Judy Johnson, Jimmie Foxx, Al Kaline)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | September 26, 1992
Relief pitcher Todd Frohwirth said he will appeal the $1,000 fine American League president Bobby Brown levied against him for throwing his cap and glove after he was ejected from a game on Aug. 19.Frohwirth, normally mild-mannered, raged after plate umpire Larry Barnett ejected him against the Seattle Mariners for arguing balls and strikes. He was so angry that he took off his cap and threw it on the field, then hurled his glove over the umpires, all the way to third base.There is an automatic $100 fine for throwing equipment, but the league president can increase the amount for flagrant violations.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | September 20, 2008
Jersey drenched, rain dripping off the bill of his cap, Hoyt Wilhelm kicked nervously at the mound. "Jeez," the Orioles pitcher muttered, weighing the gravity of the moment. "Oh, jeez." Wilhelm peered through the slop for the sign. As if it mattered. More than 18,000 fans at Memorial Stadium on Sept. 20, 1958, knew the knuckleball was coming. For 8 2/3 innings on a dreary Saturday afternoon in Baltimore, Wilhelm's butterfly pitch had fooled New York's American League champions. Now one batter, the Yankees' ornery Hank Bauer, stood between the Orioles and history.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | September 20, 1990
Fact: The nine hitters earning at least $3 million a year (Jose Canseco, Kirby Puckett, Don Mattingly, Robin Yount, Kevin Mitchell, Will Clark, Eric Davis, Joe Carter, Rickey Henderson) are hitting a combined average of .270 this year with an average of 21 home runs and 75 RBI.Opinion: If Gregg Olson's arm isn't 100 percent, he shouldn't pitch the rest of the year.Fact: Since the beginning of the 1988 season, the Redskins have won five of 17 games against teams with winning records.Opinion: If the 49ers slip, the Giants will be the team that catches them.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 20, 2002
ON SUNDAY, the Baltimore Orioles inducted Hoyt Wilhelm into their Hall of Fame. Some of us still remember the day Wilhelm no-hit the New York Yankees. It was 1958. The day was overcast. Gus Triandos hit a home run. Billy Gardner, cheek bursting with chewing tobacco, caught the last out. Some of us remember the details because we were still kids back then. To watch a baseball game is to gain entrance to childhood for a few hours at a time. But the ballplayers are about to kill off a whole generation of the young at heart if they go through with their insane talk of a labor strike Aug. 30. What the players don't seem to understand is this: We have other things on our minds now. Not only football games, not only kids returning to school, and terrorist nightmare worries and the fate of our diminishing 401(k)
NEWS
By James H. Bready | April 5, 1999
IT IS time, as the last baseball season of the 1900s begins, to put together the Baltimore team of the century. That is, a lineup of the best players to have pitched, batted and fielded in this city's behalf.Such a project could be carried out in committee of the whole (48,876 seating capacity) ballpark, or by any one centenarian. The ensuing argument could carry us into the 2000s.Rules: to be eligible, a nominee must have played at least one full, pennant-standings inning for a Baltimore team in the American, Federal, Negro or International leagues, in the 1900s (sorry, Judy Johnson, Jimmie Foxx, Al Kaline)
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
He's not pitching any longer, not throwing that devilishly fluttering knuckleball, but as he nears his 72nd birthday, Hoyt Wilhelm still is in baseball.Wilhelm didn't reach the major leagues until he was 28, but lasted 21 years, until he was 49, and wound up in the Hall of Fame in 1985 based primarily on his relief record of 124-103 and 227 saves. To put his longevity into perspective, he made the National League All-Star team in 1953 with the New York Giants and a final time 17 years later with the Atlanta Braves at 47.You see, the knuckleball, which he threw 90 percent of the time, doesn't take as much out of an arm as fastballs and curves.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | September 26, 1992
Relief pitcher Todd Frohwirth said he will appeal the $1,000 fine American League president Bobby Brown levied against him for throwing his cap and glove after he was ejected from a game on Aug. 19.Frohwirth, normally mild-mannered, raged after plate umpire Larry Barnett ejected him against the Seattle Mariners for arguing balls and strikes. He was so angry that he took off his cap and threw it on the field, then hurled his glove over the umpires, all the way to third base.There is an automatic $100 fine for throwing equipment, but the league president can increase the amount for flagrant violations.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
One of Orioles manager Johnny Oates' first duties yesterday was to calm the nerves of catcher Chris Hoiles.Hoiles hadn't done anything wrong. In fact, his hot bat led Oates to bat Hoiles in the cleanup spot for the first time this year."
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | September 20, 1990
Fact: The nine hitters earning at least $3 million a year (Jose Canseco, Kirby Puckett, Don Mattingly, Robin Yount, Kevin Mitchell, Will Clark, Eric Davis, Joe Carter, Rickey Henderson) are hitting a combined average of .270 this year with an average of 21 home runs and 75 RBI.Opinion: If Gregg Olson's arm isn't 100 percent, he shouldn't pitch the rest of the year.Fact: Since the beginning of the 1988 season, the Redskins have won five of 17 games against teams with winning records.Opinion: If the 49ers slip, the Giants will be the team that catches them.
NEWS
February 24, 2011
May 27, 1960: Orioles manager Paul Richards introduced his “big mitt,” an oversized catcher’s mitt designed to cut down on passed balls when knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm was pitching.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.