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NEWS
May 11, 1994
It isn't often that a single politician can rightly claim credit for a $300 million construction project that should firmly establish Maryland as a preeminent location for historians and researchers delving into the American past. But that's the case tomorrow when the National Archives and Records Administration opens its giant new building on the College Park campus of the University of Maryland. It should be called Hoyer's Archives.For 25 years, the National Archives has been looking for a new home.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
- With little competition at home, lawmakers from Maryland are traveling farther down the campaign trail this year to influence the midterm elections. Members of the state's congressional delegation have popped up in North Carolina, California and Virginia in recent weeks to stump for colleagues in the closely fought races that will determine which party controls the Senate in January - and those that will likely set the political tone in Washington for the final two years of Barack Obama's presidency.
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NEWS
August 5, 2010
Congratulations on your new humor column ("No more 'Ivies' on the Supreme Court," Commentary, Aug. 5). Cummings, Hoyer, and O'Malley for the Supreme Court. Absolutely hilarious. Perhaps you could add illustrations and use this to replace Doonesbury, which is not nearly as humorous. Earle S. Dashiell
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Testing hospital patients on their ability to perform everyday tasks before they are released could go a long way to keeping them from returning to the hospital, new research from Johns Hopkins University suggests. Tasks such as moving from a bed to a chair, eating, using the toilet and communicating are uniformly assessed after patients go to rehabilitation facilities from hospitals, but function isn't always tested in a standardized way before they go. And Hopkins researchers found that low scores on a standardized test of the tasks was a good predictor of hospital readmission.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Rep. Steny Hoyer's decision to support same-sex marriage could bring a powerful ally to efforts in Maryland to retain the gay marriage law in the state. A source close to Hoyer said Friday that the Democratic House leader will "oppose efforts to repeal the new Maryland law. " Hoyer said in a statement Thursday that "because I believe that equal treatment is a central tenet of our nation, I believe that extending the definition of marriage to committed relationships between two people, irrespective of their sex, is the right thing to do. " The Southern Maryland Democrat had previously backed a prohibition of gay marriage, voting with 117 other Democrats in support of the Defense of Marriage Act in 1996.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
Defense attorneys for state Sen. Ulysses S. Currie continued a theme Tuesday, calling an influential member of Congress to the stand who testified that their client is honest, but hopelessly disorganized. U.S. Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, the second highest-ranking Democrat in the House of Representatives, testified that Currie, who's on trial in federal court in Baltimore on corruption charges, is "not particularly taken with details or organization. " "He did not pay attention to details, but he did pay attention to people," Hoyer said of Currie, who is accused, along with two former executives from Shoppers Food Warehouse, of using a public-relations consulting contract to cover up a $245,000 bribery scheme that bought legislative favors for the food chain.
NEWS
By GRAHAM MOOMAW and Capital News Service | January 16, 2010
It didn't take much for Charles Lollar to fire up the audience as one of the first speakers at Wednesday's Tea Party rally in Annapolis. "Believe it or not, I'm running against Steny Hoyer," Lollar said to a crowd of several hundred cheering conservatives gathered outside the State House as part of the national Tea Party movement, which protests high taxes and government overspending. Lollar, whose most recent political position was the chairmanship of the Charles County Republican Central Committee, is hoping to translate his Tea Party stardom into a serious run for Congress against House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Mechanicsville, in Maryland's 5th Congressional District.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2010
It's not dawn yet, but Rep. Steny H. Hoyer is already greeting voters at a park-and-ride lot in Southern Maryland. His seat in the House of Representatives is considered safe in Tuesday's election, but his status as its second-ranking member certainly isn't. If Democrats lose the House, as analysts predict, Hoyer will be out as majority leader. He has been working hard to prevent such an outcome, and to increase his own victory margin as much as possible. He raised money at Washington events and campaigned for Democratic colleagues around the country.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
Divided House Democrats re-elected their leaders to minority party positions in the next Congress, choosing Reps. Nancy Pelosi as leader and Steny H. Hoyer as whip. Perhaps appropriately, given Maryland's status as an island of Democratic blue in a widening sea of Republican red, the state can lay claim to fully half of the top six members of the incoming leadership team. Pelosi was born in Baltimore, and Hoyer represents the southern part of the state. A sixth member, Rep. Chris Van Hollen, represents Maryland's Washington suburbs.
NEWS
November 12, 2006
Amid all the anticipation over Nancy Pelosi's ascension to the House speakership, often eclipsed and cropped out of the picture is her second in command and fellow Marylander, Steny H. Hoyer, who's also on the verge of fulfilling a cherished ambition. Mr. Hoyer, 67, of Southern Maryland by way of Prince George's County, has spent his life in politics of one sort or another - beginning with student government in junior high, becoming state Senate president by age 35 and absorbed for the past quarter-century in rising by fits and starts through leadership ranks in the House, where he now serves as minority whip.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
In a duel of sorts between two of Maryland's top Democrats, U.S. Rep. Steny Hoyer went to Annapolis Tuesday to press for legislation opposed by Gov. Martin O'Malley that Southern Maryland officials insist is needed to protect their region's prized naval air base from an Eastern Shore wind energy project. Hoyer, who represents Southern Maryland in Congress, said he was making his first appearance before a legislative committee since leaving the General Assembly for Washington in the 1970s.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Brian Hoyer grew up rooting for the Cleveland Browns as a young boy, wearing a Bernie Kosar jersey while sitting in the upper deck of old Municipal Stadium with his father. Now Hoyer is the Browns' starting quarterback with starter Brandon Weeden ruled out for the second game in a row because of a sprained right thumb suffered during a loss two weeks ago to the Ravens. These are heady times for Hoyer, a Cleveland St. Ignatius graduate preparing for his second NFL start Sunday against the Cincinnati Bengals.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Maryland's U.S. House delegation met Wednesday with Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki to keep pressure on the agency to fix problems at the troubled Baltimore office and follow up on promises for improvement. Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, a Southern Maryland Democrat who is House minority whip, said Maryland veterans should call their congressmen to report troubles with the regional office, which has one of the nation's highest error rates and largest percentages of backlogged cases.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | February 11, 2013
Rep. Steny Hoyer called plans to extend some benefits to same-sex partners of military personnel “an important step in the right direction” - but said more change is needed. Outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said Monday that same-sex partners would be eligible for benefits including military I.D. cards and hospital visitation rights. But he said other benefits - including housing and survivor benefits - remain off-limits under the federal Defense of Marriage Act. That law, which defines marriage as the union of one man and one woman, is now under Supreme Court review.
NEWS
By Patrick Maynard | February 7, 2013
As Senate Intelligence Committee members file into room 216 of the Hart office building in Washington for a CIA confirmation hearing this afternoon, they will be under a spotlight much brighter than they anticipated last week. That was before a Monday NBC report unveiled leaked documentation from the Obama administration strongly implying that extrajudicial drone killings of American citizens abroad are made casually, with little meaningful oversight or geographic restriction.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2012
As the fiscal cliff looms, two of Maryland's most influential congressmen have a message for those looking to the federal workforce for more savings: Look somewhere else. "Federal workers have already been asked to sacrifice as part of the budget cuts that have already taken place," Rep. Chris Van Hollen, the top Democrat on the House budget committee, told reporters last week. "Now is the time to ask others to help share responsibility for reducing our deficit. " Van Hollen spoke days after Rep. Steny Hoyer wrote an op-ed urging negotiators: "Don't Throw Feds Over 'Cliff.'" "Over the past two years, federal employees have repeatedly faced threats of a government shutdown that would stop their paychecks with virtually no notice," Hoyer, the No. 2 Democrat in the House, wrote in Federal Times.
NEWS
November 12, 2002
MARYLAND Reps. Steny H. Hoyer and Constance A. Morella, colleagues for many years in the General Assembly as well as Congress, also share the distinction of bucking party trends in last week's elections. Mr. Hoyer, of Southern Maryland, is one of the few Democrats with something to celebrate in the wake of sweeping GOP victories. Ms. Morella of Montgomery County was one of only three House Republicans ousted. Through them, Marylanders stand to both gain and lose in a changing of the guard that is bittersweet.
NEWS
September 26, 1992
Are voters still angry enough at Congress to exchange one of the most powerful men on Capitol Hill for a political neophyte? The race for Maryland's newly redrawn Fifth Congressional District promises to be a useful gauge for determining if hostility toward incumbents has abated since the House check-bouncing scandal, or if it continues to be a force.Ordinarily, Republican Larry Hogan Jr. wouldn't stand a chance against Rep. Steny Hoyer. But the reaction against incumbents has made Mr. Hoyer -- the fourth-highest ranking member of his party's leadership and the quintessential "slick" politician -- vulnerable.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
Rep. Steny Hoyer deserves praise for his comments earlier this week acknowledging that Democrats need to be willing to put Social Security and Medicare on the table as part of a comprehensive solution for our nation's debt problem. To achieve the type of reasonable and responsible solution that our country needs, both Democrats and Republicans need to be willing to make compromises on areas that their core constituencies have long considered to be untouchable. Congressman Hoyer has stepped forward and shown the type of practical political leadership that our country so desperately needs.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
When the votes from the 6th Congressional District were counted last week, John Delaney didn't just become Maryland's newest House member. He also became the state's newest employer. And as Delaney and his fellow members of the congressional Class of 2012 now head to Capitol Hill for freshman orientation, they'll also be reviewing resumes, interviewing job candidates and hiring the staff members whose work can be the difference between their success or failure in Washington. Every two years, Election Day marks the end of the campaign season and the start of a hiring frenzy, as dozens of new members choose from among thousands of candidates to fill highly coveted staff positions.
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