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NEWS
May 8, 2002
IT'S DIFFICULT not to feel a measure of sympathy for the Secretary of the Army. For months, Thomas E. White has had to put up with a steady flow of questions about all sorts of seeming improprieties, the most recent of which has left him in a classic bind - one that forces him to appear either guilty or clueless - and now on top of that his Pentagon boss is making life impossible for him over a howitzer. Mr. White - a former Enron executive who is reportedly under investigation for insider trading, appears to have used his position to try to help his old company and is now linked to the manufactured energy crisis in California in 2000 - may yet be forced to resign from the Army.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Berean E. "Bill" Talbert, who founded a Baltimore County landscaping company and fought in Europe during World War II, died Tuesday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 93. The son of Richard H. Talbert, a textile mill worker, and Stella M. Talbert, a homemaker, Berean Earl Talbert was born and raised in Leaksville, N.C., which is now Eden, N.C. He was a 1937 graduate of Leaksville High School. During World War II, Mr. Talbert served with Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s 3rd Army in Europe, where he was a fire control director with a Howitzer artillery unit.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Pentagon officials said yesterday that they want to kill the $11 billion Crusader artillery gun, a heavyweight howitzer that caused a rift between its Army champions and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld. Officials said Congress would be asked to shift the money previously earmarked for Crusader to more futuristic precision weaponry. "When the dust settles, we'll find that Crusader has been ended," Rumsfeld told a Pentagon news conference, displaying confidence that he can beat back possible congressional efforts to revive the program.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,sun reporter | October 6, 2006
For more than two decades, over crabs or cans of light beer, the men of American Legion Post 180 in Rosedale have kicked around this question: Who stole the cannon? Only a few of them remember the days when the World War II-era, 1,500-pound howitzer sat in front of the post. That was before the morning in May 1982 when it was discovered missing, a hacksaw blade left in its place. Now the cannon is back. And, apparently, it never traveled very far. It was found buried in a backyard about a mile away.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon's plan to cancel an $11 billion heavyweight artillery gun was met by a skeptical Senate Armed Services Committee yesterday, with most members saying Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld made a hasty decision without consulting Army officials or taking the time to study alternative weapons. "You haven't even analyzed the alternatives," Sen. Max Cleland, a Georgia Democrat, told Rumsfeld and other defense officials. "I can't buy a pig in a poke, not with the troops in the field out there."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - It "volley'd and thunder'd" in the romantic 19th-century verse of Tennyson. Even Josef Stalin waxed poetic about its effect on the advancing Nazi hordes, terming it "the god of war." It launched the career of a gunnery cadet named Napoleon Bonaparte - and last week nearly dashed the career of Army Secretary Thomas E. White. Artillery has been dubbed the "King of Battle" for its destructive power. During the two world wars, the majority of American casualties were the result of enemy forces hurling explosive shells toward the U.S. lines.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 8, 1994
Ron Franks ought to raffle a howitzer to attract NRA contributions to his Senate campaign. Assault rifles are so puny.Justice Breyer's confirmation was all but unanimous. Senators are counting on him to build a marina on Capitol Hill just like the one in Boston.Bill's military advisers say the best time to invade Haiti is mid-September. Political advisers say mid-'96.Alex. Brown can't decide whether to leave Baltimore or acquire it.
NEWS
By Special to The Carroll County Sun | March 25, 1992
Members of the Maryland Army National Guard's 2-110th Field Artillery battalion, Battery A of Westminster, are experts in "hasty displacement."Working as a synchronized team, Battery A can pack up a 105mm howitzer cannon and be ready to move to a new location within minutes.The Westminster battery is one of three in the 2-110th, headquartered in Pikesville, Baltimore County. Two batteries are on base.Speed, precision, teamwork and attention to detail mark every member'straining, whether under heavy attack or just needed elsewhere, usinglive ammunition or blanks, working day or night.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Berean E. "Bill" Talbert, who founded a Baltimore County landscaping company and fought in Europe during World War II, died Tuesday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 93. The son of Richard H. Talbert, a textile mill worker, and Stella M. Talbert, a homemaker, Berean Earl Talbert was born and raised in Leaksville, N.C., which is now Eden, N.C. He was a 1937 graduate of Leaksville High School. During World War II, Mr. Talbert served with Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s 3rd Army in Europe, where he was a fire control director with a Howitzer artillery unit.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,sun reporter | October 6, 2006
For more than two decades, over crabs or cans of light beer, the men of American Legion Post 180 in Rosedale have kicked around this question: Who stole the cannon? Only a few of them remember the days when the World War II-era, 1,500-pound howitzer sat in front of the post. That was before the morning in May 1982 when it was discovered missing, a hacksaw blade left in its place. Now the cannon is back. And, apparently, it never traveled very far. It was found buried in a backyard about a mile away.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon's plan to cancel an $11 billion heavyweight artillery gun was met by a skeptical Senate Armed Services Committee yesterday, with most members saying Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld made a hasty decision without consulting Army officials or taking the time to study alternative weapons. "You haven't even analyzed the alternatives," Sen. Max Cleland, a Georgia Democrat, told Rumsfeld and other defense officials. "I can't buy a pig in a poke, not with the troops in the field out there."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - It "volley'd and thunder'd" in the romantic 19th-century verse of Tennyson. Even Josef Stalin waxed poetic about its effect on the advancing Nazi hordes, terming it "the god of war." It launched the career of a gunnery cadet named Napoleon Bonaparte - and last week nearly dashed the career of Army Secretary Thomas E. White. Artillery has been dubbed the "King of Battle" for its destructive power. During the two world wars, the majority of American casualties were the result of enemy forces hurling explosive shells toward the U.S. lines.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Pentagon officials said yesterday that they want to kill the $11 billion Crusader artillery gun, a heavyweight howitzer that caused a rift between its Army champions and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld. Officials said Congress would be asked to shift the money previously earmarked for Crusader to more futuristic precision weaponry. "When the dust settles, we'll find that Crusader has been ended," Rumsfeld told a Pentagon news conference, displaying confidence that he can beat back possible congressional efforts to revive the program.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
IT'S DIFFICULT not to feel a measure of sympathy for the Secretary of the Army. For months, Thomas E. White has had to put up with a steady flow of questions about all sorts of seeming improprieties, the most recent of which has left him in a classic bind - one that forces him to appear either guilty or clueless - and now on top of that his Pentagon boss is making life impossible for him over a howitzer. Mr. White - a former Enron executive who is reportedly under investigation for insider trading, appears to have used his position to try to help his old company and is now linked to the manufactured energy crisis in California in 2000 - may yet be forced to resign from the Army.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 8, 1994
Ron Franks ought to raffle a howitzer to attract NRA contributions to his Senate campaign. Assault rifles are so puny.Justice Breyer's confirmation was all but unanimous. Senators are counting on him to build a marina on Capitol Hill just like the one in Boston.Bill's military advisers say the best time to invade Haiti is mid-September. Political advisers say mid-'96.Alex. Brown can't decide whether to leave Baltimore or acquire it.
NEWS
By Special to The Carroll County Sun | March 25, 1992
Members of the Maryland Army National Guard's 2-110th Field Artillery battalion, Battery A of Westminster, are experts in "hasty displacement."Working as a synchronized team, Battery A can pack up a 105mm howitzer cannon and be ready to move to a new location within minutes.The Westminster battery is one of three in the 2-110th, headquartered in Pikesville, Baltimore County. Two batteries are on base.Speed, precision, teamwork and attention to detail mark every member'straining, whether under heavy attack or just needed elsewhere, usinglive ammunition or blanks, working day or night.
NEWS
December 25, 1990
Two sailors from the aircraft carrier USS Midway were killed when their tour bus overturned on a liberity excursion in Abu Dhabi, the United Arab Emirates, the military's Joint Information Bureau announced yesterday. Five other sailors were injured, two seriously, in the accident.Also, it was announced yesterday that one of five soldiers injured in a training accident last week has died.One of the soldiers, in a coma since the explosion of a howitzer, died Sunday, the military said.
NEWS
By Harry G. Summers Jr | January 31, 1991
AERIAL BOMBARDMENT continues to take its toll during the allied air campaign against Iraq, but another kind of bombardment is yet to come. "It is with artillery that war is made," said Napoleon Bonaparte, and casualty figures from America's most recent wars still bear him out.In World War II, shrapnel (fragments from exploding artillery shells) caused 53 percent of U.S. battle deaths and 62 percent of wounds. In Korea shrapnel caused 59 percent of the deaths and 61 percent of the wounds. Even in the close-quarter fighting in the jungles of Vietnam, where enemy rifle and machine gun fire caused the majority of deaths, enemy shell fragments still caused 36 percent of the deaths and 65 percent of the wounds.
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