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NEWS
September 30, 1999
GRID Properties is not a household name in Baltimore. It is in New York and Philadelphia, though, where the company is constructing two important commercial revitalization projects -- Harlem USA and Jump Street USA.Teaming up with Grid Properties, the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation is negotiating with Baltimore officials about a proposal that would bring national-brand retailers, a 10-screen movie theater, offices, 345 apartments and 960 parking spaces...
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 6, 2003
The Baltimore Board of Estimates approved an expenditure of $2 million yesterday to continue the condemnation and purchase of properties around downtown Howard Street as part of the west-side redevelopment project. The city's development arm, Baltimore Development Corp., will use the money to start buying properties in an area bounded by Fayette, Liberty, Lexington and Howard streets, according to M.J. "Jay" Brodie, BDC's director. No developer has been selected for the site, although the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation has in the past discussed creating a retail development and might still be interested, Brodie said.
NEWS
September 16, 2009
Neighborhoods thrive when they're home to a mix of residents who reflect a broad range of occupations found in a great city. That's the role of the so-called "creative class" - arts, design and media workers, computer programmers, educators, engineers and scientists - who have been so instrumental in creating lively new communities and driving economic development in post-industrial America. The new apartment building at 26th and Howard streets is therefore just the kind of project Baltimore needs to turn around a once-vibrant pocket of the city.
NEWS
February 14, 2001
SENSIBLE development strategies -- or Smart Growth -- have been the cornerstone of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's policy agenda. So it's baffling that his capital budget ignored a requested $10 million that would speed redevelopment on the west side of Baltimore's downtown. If ever there was a compelling argument for Smart Growth revitalization, it is the Howard Street corridor. In its heyday, from the 1910s to the 1960s, it was Baltimore's Fifth Avenue, the site of the city's leading department and speciality stores.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
Barney "Barr" Harris, who was born above his father's Howard Street cabinetmaking business and turned it into a successful antiques auction house, died of dementia complications Thursday at Arden Court in Pikesville. The longtime Bolton Hill resident was 94. "His auctions were like the original 'Antiques Road Show,'" said John Huppert, a collector who lives in Charles Village. "You sat there and were entertained and informed. You learned as he spoke. It was a delightful spectacle.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Laura Vozzella and Marcia Myers and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
A new track running through Baltimore's century-old Howard Street tunnel is about the only sign left that one year ago today a CSX train carrying hazardous chemicals derailed, ruptured and fueled an inferno that taxed firefighters for days, closed downtown businesses, canceled baseball games and created a regional transportation logjam. Investigators still are not certain what caused the accident. It might be months before they know, if ever, given the apparent complexity of the case. Meanwhile, at least two dozen trains continue to use the tunnel daily, many of them carrying the same sorts of hazardous materials under Baltimore streets as the 60-car train that derailed last July 18. City and railroad officials believe there is minimal risk of a repeat accident.
NEWS
June 29, 1998
SINCE the flagship department stores deserted Howard Street, beginning in the 1970s, Baltimore's own Fifth Avenue has been struggling. It may never again thrive as a retail hub. But it does have potential for revitalization.The area has superb transit and highway connections. And its location -- close to the downtown business district, the Inner Harbor and the University of Maryland professional schools and medical institutions -- is unbeatable.A new master plan bankrolled by the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, the area's major real estate owner, outlines a 10-year strategy to renew the Howard Street corridor.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1996
NOW THAT city and state officials have found a way to reopen the entire length of Howard Street to automobile traffic, they could help revitalize the corridor even more by moving ahead with another long-awaited project: construction of artists' housing.Nearly a year has passed since Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke dubbed Howard Street the "Avenue of the Arts," and a nonprofit group affiliated with the city sought proposals from developers who wanted to build apartments and galleries that could provide the beginning of a self-sufficient arts community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | August 8, 2004
The Howard Street Bridge that crosses the Jones Falls Expressway is no Pont Neuf. Swaddled during a restoration project by a humongous tarp that billows and balloons in the breeze, the bridge does call to mind Pont Neuf Wrapped, a monumental work completed by environmental artist Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, in 1985. After a 10-year-struggle with Parisian bureaucracy, Christo and a large crew wrapped the Pont Neuf in shimmering gold fabric that temporarily revealed the 400-year-old bridge in a dazzling new way. Unlike in Paris, though, Baltimore authorities didn't question Howard Street Bridge Wrapped; they created it. It may not be as dramatic as its French counterpart, but for those driving south on the JFX, the draped bridge emerges as a mammoth work of accidental art. Moving with the wind, sometimes escaping its moorings, the tarp gives artistic license to the bridge, built in 1938.
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