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Howard Street

NEWS
April 2, 2000
IT'S A GOOD THING the General Assembly will vote on the state's budget tomorrow. Maybe that will stop the recent posturing and wrangling over a plan to revitalize the western edge of downtown Baltimore. No one claims to oppose the project, which promises to breathe new life into the city's old retail district along Howard Street, between Charles Center and the University of Maryland campus. But too many interest groups are insisting that it happen only on their terms. After it began to look like the $350-million west side plan, announced just 18 months ago, might actually happen, this bevy of special interest groups ganged up to take it hostage.
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NEWS
September 16, 2009
Neighborhoods thrive when they're home to a mix of residents who reflect a broad range of occupations found in a great city. That's the role of the so-called "creative class" - arts, design and media workers, computer programmers, educators, engineers and scientists - who have been so instrumental in creating lively new communities and driving economic development in post-industrial America. The new apartment building at 26th and Howard streets is therefore just the kind of project Baltimore needs to turn around a once-vibrant pocket of the city.
NEWS
February 14, 2001
SENSIBLE development strategies -- or Smart Growth -- have been the cornerstone of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's policy agenda. So it's baffling that his capital budget ignored a requested $10 million that would speed redevelopment on the west side of Baltimore's downtown. If ever there was a compelling argument for Smart Growth revitalization, it is the Howard Street corridor. In its heyday, from the 1910s to the 1960s, it was Baltimore's Fifth Avenue, the site of the city's leading department and speciality stores.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | December 2, 2007
The Howard Street Tunnel has been a headache from the day its opened in 1895. It drove the railroad that built it into bankruptcy. It's been obsolete for decades. A derailment and chemical fire in 2001 showed it to be a bottleneck for East Coast freight rail traffic. And it's likely to remain that way for a long time. Alternatives have been proposed, but any of them would be costly and take decades to build. CSX Transportation, the tunnel's owner, seems in no rush to replace it. "For the foreseeable future, that tunnel is an important part of our network," said railroad spokesman Bob Sullivan.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 30, 2011
Barney "Barr" Harris, who was born above his father's Howard Street cabinetmaking business and turned it into a successful antiques auction house, died of dementia complications Thursday at Arden Court in Pikesville. The longtime Bolton Hill resident was 94. "His Friday night auctions were like the original 'Antiques Road Show,'" said John Huppert, a collector who lives in Charles Village. "You sat there and were entertained and informed. You learned as he spoke. It was a delightful spectacle.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Laura Vozzella and Marcia Myers and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
A new track running through Baltimore's century-old Howard Street tunnel is about the only sign left that one year ago today a CSX train carrying hazardous chemicals derailed, ruptured and fueled an inferno that taxed firefighters for days, closed downtown businesses, canceled baseball games and created a regional transportation logjam. Investigators still are not certain what caused the accident. It might be months before they know, if ever, given the apparent complexity of the case. Meanwhile, at least two dozen trains continue to use the tunnel daily, many of them carrying the same sorts of hazardous materials under Baltimore streets as the 60-car train that derailed last July 18. City and railroad officials believe there is minimal risk of a repeat accident.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 21, 2011
Curt Raymond Schaefer, an architectural designer who was an advocate for the rejuvenation of aging Baltimore landmarks, died Sunday of complications from the flu at his Mount Vernon Place home. He was 51. Mr. Schaefer worked with design teams on the preservation of the Druid Hill Park Conservatory, the Lab School on the old Goucher College campus and the Enoch Pratt Free Library 's Canton and Edmondson Village branches. "I see my role as restoring and bringing back to use the historic buildings on the west side of downtown Baltimore," he told a Baltimore Sun reporter in 2008.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 30, 2011
The door at 831 N. Howard St. swings open to one of Baltimore's more charming salesrooms. But Friday, when I stopped by the place known as the Imperial Half Bushel, it was a dispiriting and depressing sight. The 19th-century walnut and oak showcases were empty. Gone were the silver forks and spoons made by Baltimore silversmiths. The water pitchers, the cups, the napkin holders had disappeared. Sometime between Sept. 17 and Sept. 20, thieves looted $100,000 worth of silver from this little shop located on a stretch known as Antiques Row. Fred and Nancy Duggan and their son, Patrick, opened their silver business in 1976.
NEWS
June 29, 1998
SINCE the flagship department stores deserted Howard Street, beginning in the 1970s, Baltimore's own Fifth Avenue has been struggling. It may never again thrive as a retail hub. But it does have potential for revitalization.The area has superb transit and highway connections. And its location -- close to the downtown business district, the Inner Harbor and the University of Maryland professional schools and medical institutions -- is unbeatable.A new master plan bankrolled by the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, the area's major real estate owner, outlines a 10-year strategy to renew the Howard Street corridor.
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