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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2010
CSX Transportation finished the removal of derailed cars from the Howard Street Tunnel today and is expected to resume rail traffic through it this evening, according to a railroad spokesman. Thirteen cars of a 79-car freight train left the tracks Thursday in the tunnel and outside its northern portal at Mount Royal Avenue for reasons yet to be determined, said CSX spokesman Bob Sullivan. With the cars removed, he said, railroad officials were repairing and inspecting the tracks to prepare for a resumption of traffic.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore may lose hundreds of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in economic activity and half of the port's containerized cargo following the state's decision not to build a new rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park. State and port officials scrambled Friday to outline alternatives to shoring up Baltimore's place in the international shipping industry ahead of the widening of the Panama Canal and the anticipated growth in Asian container traffic on the East Coast. The rail facility was meant to bring Baltimore's limited freight capacity up to par with other East Coast ports by allowing CSX Transportation to stack truck-sized shipping containers two high on trains for more efficient transportation inland.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
In the aftermath of an August derailment in the Howard Street Tunnel, CSX Transportation and Baltimore have jointly announced a series of actions to improve safety in the more than 100-year-old structure, including improved communications, stepped-up inspections and an accelerated track replacement program. The agreement reflects an increasingly cooperative relationship between the freight railroad and City Hall and stands in stark contrast to the finger-pointing and recriminations that marked the response to the near-catastrophic 2001 fire in the tunnel.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Driven by a surge of opposition from people who live in Southwest Baltimore, several city leaders have withdrawn support for a major CSX Transportation rail facility proposed for the area. Until recently, the project moved smoothly through early planning stages, after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake invited CSX to locate the facility - viewed as critical for the Port of Baltimore - in the city. City Councilman Edward Reisinger, who represents the Morrell Park neighborhood where the facility is proposed to go, said his position "evolved" after CSX officials showed what he characterized as a lack of respect for the community by failing to answer questions or address concerns.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 1, 1995
If you opened a Baltimore newspaper 100 years ago, a big ad on page one jumped out like an express train: "BELT LINE OPEN."What was new and marveled at in 1895 is today quietly overlooked, often forgotten.But listen on a rainy or humid day. Turn your ear to the dull roar and mournful whistle of a freight train in the Howard Street Tunnel, a splendid piece of 19th-Century engineering that turns 100 today.Nearly 1.7 miles long, the tunnel has become the largest underground conduit of rail freight on the Atlantic Coast.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
The derailment that killed two young women in Ellicott City Tuesday morning adds one more incident to a long history of CSX trains leaving the tracks in Maryland - from little-remembered events in the company's own railyards to the spectacular fire in the Howard Street Tunnel in 2001. It could be months before federal investigators determine the cause of the bizarre tragedy that occurred overnight in the historic Howard County mill town. The facts that emerged Tuesday suggested the fatalities were largely the result of trespassing on the tracks.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Del Quentin Wilber and David Michael Ettlin and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
Civil defense sirens wailed and major highways into Baltimore were closed after a freight train hauling hazardous chemicals caught fire yesterday afternoon in a century-old railroad tunnel under Howard Street, shutting down much of the city's downtown. Choking black smoke spewed from both ends of the 1.7-mile Howard Street Tunnel, and fear of an explosion or toxic fumes from a cargo that included dangerous acids prompted authorities to ban pedestrians and vehicles within five blocks of its openings at Camden Yards and Mount Royal Station.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
As of 9:30 a.m. Thursday, two lanes of the inner loop of the Baltimore Beltway near Hawkins Point Road were closed due to an accident involving three vehicles. Ridgely Street in Baltimore City was closed temporarily between Alluvion Street and West Ostend Street because a train was delayed by engine failure in the Howard Street tunnel. Bayard Street was temporarily closed between Severn Street and Ridgely Street for the same reason. No delays have been reported on mass transit systems.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
CSX Transportation has determined that the cause of the Aug. 5 derailment in the Howard Street Tunnel was defective track, spokesman Gary Saese said Thursday. Saese said "there's no doubt" that a broken rail caused 13 cars to jump the tracks in and near the more than 100-year-old tunnel — the site of a more serious derailment in 2001 that led to a chemical fire that disrupted downtown Baltimore for a week. The spokesman said the railroad had not determined what led to the break, but he said such damage typically is caused by an internal defect.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
A CSX train carrying hazardous material derailed Thursday morning in the Howard Street tunnel, the site of a similar accident in July 2001 that paralyzed the city and freight travel along the East Coast for a week. Officials said 13 cars in a 79-car train left the track about 8:15 a.m. at Howard Street and Mount Royal Avenue. Eleven cars derailed inside the tunnel, including one carrying fluorosilicic acid, a fire spokesman said. All of the cars remained upright and no hazardous material spilled, according to Roman Clark, the spokesman.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
A column of smoke rose into the sky as firefighters raced to the scene of the train derailment. The earth heaved as an explosion rattled residents and pushed windowpanes from their frames. At least one tank car was on fire - no one was sure what else. It happened Tuesday in Rosedale and it happened on July 18, 2001, when the Howard Street Tunnel beneath the city shook violently and chemical-laden cars belched toxic fumes for days. Little has changed in nearly a dozen years. The rails and highways that crisscross the crowded metro area still carry a daily stream of poisons and explosives.
NEWS
August 22, 2012
This week, we mourn for the loss of Elizabeth Nass and Rose Mayr, the 19-year-old college students who died on a downtown Ellicott City train trestle, victims of a coal train derailment late Monday night. Theirs were promising lives cut short in a truly senseless tragedy. By all accounts, the Mount Hebron High School graduates were outstanding young women, studious, outgoing, personable, funny, attractive. That they were killed seconds after posting their thoughts and a photograph on Twitter while dangling their bare feet over Main Street in a last end-of-summer get-together as the fall term at college beckoned makes the awful incident seem all the more surreal.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
The derailment that killed two young women in Ellicott City Tuesday morning adds one more incident to a long history of CSX trains leaving the tracks in Maryland - from little-remembered events in the company's own railyards to the spectacular fire in the Howard Street Tunnel in 2001. It could be months before federal investigators determine the cause of the bizarre tragedy that occurred overnight in the historic Howard County mill town. The facts that emerged Tuesday suggested the fatalities were largely the result of trespassing on the tracks.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Elkridge residents are turning to lawmakers from Howard County for help fighting the potential placement of a CSX rail transfer facility in their community, arguing that lower costs should not be the only factor considered. The site in Elkridge is the cheapest of four potential locations, and the only one estimated to stay within the original $150 million cost estimate — which CSX and the state had agreed to split equally. But Elkridge residents say the project would devastate the property values of the 353 homes that lie within a quarter-mile of the facility.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
As of 9:30 a.m. Thursday, two lanes of the inner loop of the Baltimore Beltway near Hawkins Point Road were closed due to an accident involving three vehicles. Ridgely Street in Baltimore City was closed temporarily between Alluvion Street and West Ostend Street because a train was delayed by engine failure in the Howard Street tunnel. Bayard Street was temporarily closed between Severn Street and Ridgely Street for the same reason. No delays have been reported on mass transit systems.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
Ten years ago Monday, scenes out of Baltimore gripped the nation and much of the world when a CSX freight train carrying hazardous cargo derailed and caught fire in the century-old tunnel that winds below downtown. For a week much downtown activity stopped. Three Orioles games at nearby Camden Yards were canceled. Freight rail traffic along the East Coast was paralyzed. Temperatures in the tunnel rose as high as 1,500 degrees as a witches' brew of chemicals burned alongside paper and pulp products, and smoke poured from the openings.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
Ten years ago Monday, scenes out of Baltimore gripped the nation and much of the world when a CSX freight train carrying hazardous cargo derailed and caught fire in the century-old tunnel that winds below downtown. For a week much downtown activity stopped. Three Orioles games at nearby Camden Yards were canceled. Freight rail traffic along the East Coast was paralyzed. Temperatures in the tunnel rose as high as 1,500 degrees as a witches' brew of chemicals burned alongside paper and pulp products, and smoke poured from the openings.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
Baltimore and CSX Corp. officials say they have put in place the safety recommendations demanded by federal transportation officials after their investigation of the 2001 train derailment and fire in a Baltimore tunnel. Responding to changes urged in January by the National Transportation Safety Board, the city reported yesterday that it is communicating better with CSX and is more prepared for an emergency situation in a tunnel. A CSX freight train partially derailed in the Howard Street Tunnel on July 18, 2001.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | June 17, 2011
On a train bound for Washington the other evening, I considered how much Baltimore is a city built atop tunnels. As we slipped into the darkness just beyond Penn Station, I smiled at how Baltimoreans grow fascinated by stories about our dank underground byways, under the harbor, downtown, the streets, even Federal Hill. I collect tunnel stories — like the one about the kayaker who traveled the covered section of the Jones Falls, a trip that took him from a spot near Falls Road to the harbor.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2011
Fighting City Hall is never easy, but Elkridge residents are getting high marks for their quick ability to organize to try to fend off a possible site for a major rail cargo transfer facility in their community. There is a lot at stake on both sides in a decision that puts a community's view of its future welfare in the context of a major economic project, backed by the O'Malley administration and CSX railroad, that could determine the future of Maryland's chief port. The widening of the Panama Canal will allow ever-larger container ships from Asia to reach the East Coast, and officials with the port of Baltimore want to be able to cash in. To do that, CSX must be able to double-stack 40-foot-long steel cargo containers on rail cars headed to the Midwest, but Baltimore's antiquated Howard Street Tunnel isn't big enough to accommodate such traffic.
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