Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHoward Hughes
IN THE NEWS

Howard Hughes

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
February 8, 2013
Why is Howard Hughes Corp. remaining silent on the new Symphony Woods proposal?  Previously the Columbia Association staff requested a delay on implementing the Planning Board approved plan for Symphony Woods so that they "could work collaboratively with Howard County and Howard Hughes. " CA staff is asking the CA Board to adopt this new plan without any estimate of its cost.  Will it be $10 million, $100 million or $500 million? How much of the cost will fall on the backs of the CA lien payers?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 20, 2014
Howard County government and developer Howard Hughes Corp. have agreed to a five-year, $19-million renovation plan for Columbia's Merriweather Post Pavilion, County Executive Ken Ulman announced Monday. Renovation is expected to be complete in 2019 and will include a raised main roof, new restrooms and concessions, a new stage and new artist dressing rooms. Construction will be carried out during the off-season, beginning at the close of the concert schedule in the fall of this year.  The plan also ensures that ownership of Merriweather will be handed from the developer to a county-created nonprofit, the Downtown Columbia Arts and Culture Commission, after completion of the renovations.  “This news means Merriweather Post Pavilion will get the upgrades it needs now, and will be part of the lifeblood of our community for decades to come,” Ulman said in a news release.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1997
James R. Phelan, an author and reporter who made a crusade out of investigating and writing about reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes, died of lung cancer Monday at his home in Temecula, Calif. He was 85.Mr. Phelan died just before the publication of "Money: The Battle for Howard Hughes' Billions," which he wrote with Lewis Chester. The book will be published by Random House next month.Mr. Phelan, who was a staff member at the Saturday Evening Post and a free-lance writer for several other publications, including the New York Times and Paris Match, was fascinated by Mr. Hughes' financial dealings and political machinations.
NEWS
March 26, 2014
Below is a brief description of development projects spear-headed by Howard Hughes Corp. in downtown Columbia. Whole Foods – Whole Foods Market will open in the Howard Hughes-owned Rouse Co. building located on the lakefront. The building will open in late summer or early fall. Metropolitan Downtown Columbia – A $100 million mixed-use development with 380 apartment units and 14,000 square feet of retail located in the Warfield neighborhood by the Columbia mall. Under construction and scheduled to open in late summer.
NEWS
By Ira Rifkin | April 29, 2007
That Howard Hughes was a bizarre man is indisputable. Bizarre is also how I might describe my own encounter - to use the term loosely - with the reclusive billionaire, who is back in the pop culture spotlight thanks to the new film, Hoax. Hoax is Hollywood's version of writer Clifford Irving's outrageous attempt to sell a fake Hughes autobiography back in 1971 and 1972. Despite his claims, Mr. Irving never got close to Mr. Hughes. In 1968, an odd experience left me wondering whether I had. At the time, I was a young reporter for United Press International in New York, assigned to cover Mr. Hughes' attempt to purchase a controlling interest in the American Broadcasting Company.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 2, 2004
Some longtime friends long absent from the screen are returning this fall, which should make for some happy reunions in the nation's movie theaters. Among those actors who'll be offering their work up for public inspection after especially long absences are Jodie Foster, off screen since 2002's Panic Room; Annette Bening, off screen since 2000's What Planet Are You From? and even Barbra Streisand, AWOL since 1996's The Mirror Has Two Faces. Babs get the award for returning in the unlikeliest place; she'll be playing Ben Stiller's mother in Meet the Fockers (Dec.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 27, 2004
Howard Hughes was rich. Howard Hughes was weird. That may be as much as most Americans know about Hughes, who entered adult life as one of the richest men in America and died in 1976 an emaciated recluse. But there was far more to the man than that. Hughes was an American original - brash, phobic, visionary, flawed, pioneering, obsessive, charismatic, womanizing. Having inherited millions thanks to a drill bit invented by his father, he spent huge chunks of money on his passions: flying and making movies.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1996
LAS VEGAS -- The images endure: flashing neon, sweltering heat, shotgun betrothals, street hawkers selling smut and midnight romance all colliding in this outpost of Elvis impersonators and eternal hope in a slot machine.But across the desert landscape, another image is soaring above the rest: construction cranes silhouetted against the Red Rock Mountains.This is the future of Las Vegas.And Rouse Co., one of the nation's premier real estate developers, has laid its claim here into the next century, buying a legacy of the past: the last remnants of the Howard Hughes estate.
NEWS
May 26, 2007
Worked for Howard Hughes Frank William Gay, a senior corporate officer for Howard Hughes and the recent target of a renewed claim on the billionaire's fortune, has died. Mr. Gay, who lived in Humble, Texas, died Monday in a hospital in Kingwood, Texas, according to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase. The cause was not released. He ran Hughes' holding company, Summa Corp., and was on the executive committee that ran his medical institute. Mr. Gay also served as chairman of Hughes Air Corp.
FEATURES
By Jon Anderson and Jon Anderson,Chicago Tribune | August 9, 1993
The life of Howard Hughes, as chronicled here, reminds us that an excess of money can lead not to happiness but to personal chaos.Take Christmas Eve of 1940. Hughes was at home snuggling with actress Gene Tierney. His front doorbell rang. In bounced dancer Ginger Rogers, whom Hughes was also dating, dressed as Santa Claus -- white cotton beard, red velvet suit, black boots -- and carrying a bag stuffed with gifts.As biographer Charles Higham relates, Tierney "made a rather clumsy escape." Ms. Rogers and Hughes "plunged into a furious fight."
EXPLORE
February 8, 2013
Why is Howard Hughes Corp. remaining silent on the new Symphony Woods proposal?  Previously the Columbia Association staff requested a delay on implementing the Planning Board approved plan for Symphony Woods so that they "could work collaboratively with Howard County and Howard Hughes. " CA staff is asking the CA Board to adopt this new plan without any estimate of its cost.  Will it be $10 million, $100 million or $500 million? How much of the cost will fall on the backs of the CA lien payers?
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
As a further sign of its investment in the revitalization of Columbia's town center, the Howard Hughes Corp. last week acquired the former Ryland Group headquarters, a nine-story office building next to The Mall in Columbia and close to land where Howard Hughes plans to build a $100 million apartment and retail complex. The property known as 70 Corporate Center opened in 1992 at Little Patuxtent and Broken Land parkways and is one of Columbia's largest office buildings, with nearly 170,000 square feet of space.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
The Howard Hughes Corp. moved closer this month to firming up plans for an 817-unit residential development in Columbia's town center by naming two partners who well help carry out the project. Howard Hughes announced that it will be working with Kettler, of McLean, Va., a privately held company with a strong record of multi-family housing development.. Also involved with the partnership is Orchard Development of Ellicott City, founded in 1979 by Maryland home builder Earl Armiger.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
The Howard Hughes Corp. moved closer this month to firming up plans for an 817-unit residential development in Columbia's town center by naming two partners who will help carry out the project. Howard Hughes announced it will be working with Kettler of McLean, Va., which specializes in multi-family housing development. Also involved with the partnership is Orchard Development of Ellicott City. Howard Hughes officials announced in October that they were seeking county approval to build a mixed-use development containing up to 817 residences and more than 75,000 square feet of retail space next to the Mall in Columbia.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
In its first major project planned for downtown Columbia since emerging from bankruptcy last November, the town's master developer has proposed building up to 817 residences and 70,000 square feet of retail space. The Howard Hughes Corp., which controls much of the land once held by the Rouse Co., says the as-yet-unnamed project next to The Mall in Columbia is being designed to attract young professionals and others who work nearby. Robert Jenkins, vice president of engineering for Howard Hughes, said his company chose the site for its first downtown project because it has "major infrastructure" already in place, including water and sewer service, and is centrally located and within easy walking distance of restaurants, stores and other amenities.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
John E. DeWolf III has been the new corporate boss of Columbia for nine days, and he's itching to announce the first redevelopment project in the three-decade-long plan to transform the town's center into a real downtown. Given the project's six-year history of discussion, contention and legislation, but no construction, that would take the project to a new level. "We're going to be ready to go forward very soon," the 56-year-old New York lawyer and retail real estate development expert said.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1996
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute will distribute $80 million over the next four years to 30 U.S. medical schools -- including $3.4 million to the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine -- to shore up their research facilities, the institute announced today.Officials at the Chevy Chase-based research philanthropy intend the money to help support younger faculty members, pilot studies and communication technology."Academic medical centers across the country are being squeezed by reductions in patient-care revenues and restrictions on government research spending," Dr. Purnell W. Choppin, the institute's president, said in a written statement.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | May 28, 2008
A Johns Hopkins University molecular biologist is among the 56 researchers who will share $600 million in grants awarded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Duojia Pan, an associate professor of molecular biology and genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will receive about $500,000 a year for five years to study how organs control their own growth. "I'm really excited about this," said Pan, who is known as D.J. "It's not only the money - it's an honor." Announced Monday, the awards will go to innovative scientists who are conducting research on cutting-edge topics.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | June 9, 2009
Dorothy W. "Dotty" Taylor, a former WAMPAS Baby starlet and Hollywood movie actress who appeared during the early 1930s in comedies starring Laurel & Hardy and Charlie Chase, died in her sleep Thursday at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. She was 96. She was born Dorothy Violet Wannenwetch, the daughter of a founder of the Western Southern Life Insurance Co. and a homemaker. During her early years, she moved with her family to Virginia Beach, Va., and later to Baltimore, where she graduated in 1929 from the old Hannah More Academy in Reisterstown.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | May 28, 2008
A Johns Hopkins University molecular biologist is among the 56 researchers who will share $600 million in grants awarded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Duojia Pan, an associate professor of molecular biology and genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will receive about $500,000 a year for five years to study how organs control their own growth. "I'm really excited about this," said Pan, who is known as D.J. "It's not only the money - it's an honor." Announced Monday, the awards will go to innovative scientists who are conducting research on cutting-edge topics.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.