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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2001
The Senator Theatre marks its 62nd anniversary with a weeklong salute to the movies of 1939, the Senator's first year of operation. At 1939 admission prices - 25 cents - the series is a bargain, a delight, and it's timely, too: The eight attractions bring home the wildly different ways international filmmakers responded to war-clouds breaking over Asia and Europe. Jean Renoir reacted more dazzlingly than anyone else with his masterpiece, Rules of the Game (Monday at 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.)
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
Timothy Picciotti, a computer engineer who worked in defense systems and was active in Howard County youth athletics, died of cancer Dec. 27 at his Highland home. He was 46. Born in Akron, Ohio, he was the son of an electrical engineer and a homemaker. He earned a mathematics degree at Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio, and was hired by Westinghouse. He then came to Baltimore and worked in software systems engineering and technical management of airborne radar programs. He later earned two Bachelor of Science degrees, in mathematics and computer science, and a Master of Science degree from the Johns Hopkins University.
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Washington -- You know how to do The Look, don't you? You put your chin down, your eyes up and you blow a hole through the collective consciousness of everyone from your co-star to the people in the cheap seats of the theater.Still works, at least for Lauren Bacall.Yesterday, Ms. Bacall, who inadvertently created The Look some 50 years ago as a way of controlling her nervous shaking during the filming of her first movie, cast that trademark glance at each of the some 250 fans who lined up in a bookstore here for her to autograph her newly published second book, "Now," or her previous best seller, "By Myself."
SPORTS
By From Sun staff reports | January 14, 2010
Alex Vega had a game-high 23 points as the No. 7 River Hill girls basketball team defeated Howard, 53-36, Wednesday. The host Hawks (11-1) have won six of their past seven games, including a 60-48 victory over Howard on Jan. 5. River Hill extended its three-point halftime lead by outscoring the Lions 13-4 in the fourth quarter. Alauna Jackson led Howard (8-4) with 14 points. No. 12 Catonsville 64, Patapsco 40: Candace McCray had a game-high 18 points to lead the visiting Comets (11-1)
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to The Sun | August 27, 1995
I was browsing through the fall catalog of a mail-order house that sells movies on videocassette. Though the 123-page booklet was mostly divided up by subject matter - "Action," "Great Couples," "Family Movies" - a dozen or so famous names were given sections of their own: Clark Gable and Robert De Niro had a quarter-page each, Alfred Hitchcock a column, Audrey Hepburn a page. But only one star got two whole pages all to himself. Tom Hanks? Bogart? Fred Astaire? Nope. It was John Wayne.Sixteen years after his death, the most popular movie star of the century remains exactly what he was throughout the second half of his life: a universal symbol of what America means to itself.
SPORTS
By Stan Rappaport and Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
River Hill completed a two-day sweep of the county's top two teams with a 7-5 victory over 12th-ranked Howard yesterday.The Hawks, winners of five straight, defeated No. 14 Glenelg, 3-1, on Tuesday. Howard's loss and Glenelg's doubleheader win over Hammond left both teams with 12-3 county records with three games remaining -- the last against each other at Glenelg on Tuesday.Howard outhit River Hill, 10-5, and from the third inning on outscored the Hawks, 3-1. But the Lions, who scored twice in the seventh and had the tying run at the plate, couldn't overcome a disastrous first.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff reports | January 14, 2010
Alex Vega had a game-high 23 points as the No. 7 River Hill girls basketball team defeated Howard, 53-36, Wednesday. The host Hawks (11-1) have won six of their past seven games, including a 60-48 victory over Howard on Jan. 5. River Hill extended its three-point halftime lead by outscoring the Lions 13-4 in the fourth quarter. Alauna Jackson led Howard (8-4) with 14 points. No. 12 Catonsville 64, Patapsco 40: Candace McCray had a game-high 18 points to lead the visiting Comets (11-1)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
Timothy Picciotti, a computer engineer who worked in defense systems and was active in Howard County youth athletics, died of cancer Dec. 27 at his Highland home. He was 46. Born in Akron, Ohio, he was the son of an electrical engineer and a homemaker. He earned a mathematics degree at Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio, and was hired by Westinghouse. He then came to Baltimore and worked in software systems engineering and technical management of airborne radar programs. He later earned two Bachelor of Science degrees, in mathematics and computer science, and a Master of Science degree from the Johns Hopkins University.
FEATURES
By A Reader's Guide to Twentieth Century Writers | November 15, 1998
William Faulkner(1897-1962)Faulkner often flew himself to and from Hollywood and his farm in Mississippi, having his own pilot's license. His most enduring films include "To Have and Have Not," "The Big Sleep," and Howard Hawks's epic "Land of the Pharaohs."He wrote "The Marble Faun," "Soldiers' Pay" and later "Sartoris" which introduces Yoknapatawpha County, the fictitious locale for all his later fiction."The Sound and the Fury," "As I Lay Dying" and "Light in August" are among Faulkner's most memorable books.
NEWS
August 21, 2008
MANNY FARBER, 91 Painter, film critic Manny Farber, a painter whose spiky, impassioned film criticism waged war against sacred cows such as Orson Welles and elevated American genre-movie directors like Howard Hawks and Sam Fuller to the Hollywood pantheon, died Monday at his home in Leucadia, Calif. His death was confirmed by Jean-Pierre Gorin, a friend and colleague at the University of California at San Diego. Mr. Farber, a quirky prose stylist with a barbed lance, responded to film viscerally.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2001
The Senator Theatre marks its 62nd anniversary with a weeklong salute to the movies of 1939, the Senator's first year of operation. At 1939 admission prices - 25 cents - the series is a bargain, a delight, and it's timely, too: The eight attractions bring home the wildly different ways international filmmakers responded to war-clouds breaking over Asia and Europe. Jean Renoir reacted more dazzlingly than anyone else with his masterpiece, Rules of the Game (Monday at 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.)
SPORTS
By Stan Rappaport and Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
River Hill completed a two-day sweep of the county's top two teams with a 7-5 victory over 12th-ranked Howard yesterday.The Hawks, winners of five straight, defeated No. 14 Glenelg, 3-1, on Tuesday. Howard's loss and Glenelg's doubleheader win over Hammond left both teams with 12-3 county records with three games remaining -- the last against each other at Glenelg on Tuesday.Howard outhit River Hill, 10-5, and from the third inning on outscored the Hawks, 3-1. But the Lions, who scored twice in the seventh and had the tying run at the plate, couldn't overcome a disastrous first.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to The Sun | August 27, 1995
I was browsing through the fall catalog of a mail-order house that sells movies on videocassette. Though the 123-page booklet was mostly divided up by subject matter - "Action," "Great Couples," "Family Movies" - a dozen or so famous names were given sections of their own: Clark Gable and Robert De Niro had a quarter-page each, Alfred Hitchcock a column, Audrey Hepburn a page. But only one star got two whole pages all to himself. Tom Hanks? Bogart? Fred Astaire? Nope. It was John Wayne.Sixteen years after his death, the most popular movie star of the century remains exactly what he was throughout the second half of his life: a universal symbol of what America means to itself.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Washington -- You know how to do The Look, don't you? You put your chin down, your eyes up and you blow a hole through the collective consciousness of everyone from your co-star to the people in the cheap seats of the theater.Still works, at least for Lauren Bacall.Yesterday, Ms. Bacall, who inadvertently created The Look some 50 years ago as a way of controlling her nervous shaking during the filming of her first movie, cast that trademark glance at each of the some 250 fans who lined up in a bookstore here for her to autograph her newly published second book, "Now," or her previous best seller, "By Myself."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 28, 2007
The current run of disappointing adaptations (today: Feast of Love) and remakes (next week: The Heartbreak Kid) suggests that moviemakers might be better off using the original properties as jumping-off points rather than blueprints or templates. After all, a filmed or written work of fiction often becomes distinctive because it conjures mysteries beyond the movie frame or between the lines. Billy Wilder said that when he watched David Lean's poignant extramarital romance Brief Encounter, what intrigued him was the character of the man who lent the would-be lovers his flat - that's what led Wilder to make his award-winning The Apartment.
NEWS
September 13, 1996
Joanne Dru, 74, whose appearances in 40 movies included starring roles opposite John Wayne in the classic Westerns "Red River" and "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," died of a respiratory ailment Tuesday.Dru, who was discovered by director Howard Hawks while she was working as a model, made her screen debut in 1946 in "Abie's Irish Rose." She starred in 1950 in "Wagonmaster" with Ben Johnson, and other film credits include "All the King's Men," "711 Ocean Drive," "The Pride of St. Louis" and "Thunder Bay."
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