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Howard County Council

NEWS
November 2, 2006
The Howard County Council's decision, one week before the election, to cut property taxes for elderly residents by 25 percent raises the question of whether any purpose is being served beyond currying favor with likely voters. No doubt there are economic as well as social benefits in helping retirees on fixed incomes remain in their homes without taxes tapping deeply into their disposable incomes. AARP contends that older people who remain in their communities with support networks of family, friends, activities and perhaps even jobs remain healthy longer and less of a drain on the health care system.
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NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
In Howard County, more than 100 artistic organizations and many more individuals pursue their visions in music, dance, paint, sculpture and other media. But once a year, the Howard County Arts Council brings the artistic community together under one roof to celebrate and to raise funds for grants and other programs. Tomorrow night at Jim Rouse Theatre in Columbia, musical and dance performances and a silent auction of visual art will be highlights of the annual Celebration of the Arts gala benefit.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 2005
As the new year gets under way, the PTA Council of Howard County plans to continue its advocacy on behalf of the school district's nearly 48,000 children. That means, among other things, working with the school board on policy revisions and promoting programs that help students excel, said Deborah Wessner, who is in her third year as council president. "We want to have living policies that have some meaning to people," Wessner said. "We want documents that people can refer to routinely and understand how they're enforced."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2004
When conservative Republican politician/farmer Charles Columbus Feaga is formally selected tomorrow night as Howard County's newest - and oldest - county councilman, he will take his seat with the blessings of both his friends and his political foes. "He's a true gentleman and a good guy," said council Chairman Guy Guzzone, a North Laurel-Savage Democrat who got to know Feaga in the early 1990s in the midst of his three-term council stint. Guzzone, who is expected to try for county executive in 2006, was then an aide to former Councilwoman Shane E. Pendergrass, a Democrat who is now a state delegate.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2003
A proposal to impose new limits on construction of senior communities in Howard County will be tabled by the County Council until next month to allow senior advocates time to suggest changes. Ellicott City-Elkridge Councilman Christopher J. Merdon initially proposed increasing from 20 to 50 the minimum number of units for each age-restricted housing project for people age 55 and older - a change that would limit senior developments to a smaller number of larger parcels. Merdon acted after residents in one Ellicott City neighborhood protested construction of a senior townhouse complex close to their developments of traditional single-family homes.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2002
David Rakes stepped down from the Howard Community College board of trustees last night because of his candidacy to represent District 2 on the Howard County Council. Maryland governors appointed Rakes to six-year terms on the college board in 1994 and in 2000. Rakes was vice chairman of the board from 1995 to 1997 and from 1997 to 1999. Two weeks ago, Rakes won the primary to become the Democratic nominee for the council seat, which represents east Columbia. "I am working as hard as I can to become a member of the Howard County Council, and therefore am not able to devote the time to the board that I believe it deserves," Rakes said in a statement.
NEWS
By Allison Steele and Allison Steele,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2001
College-bound Katie Newhall probably could have found a job that paid more than $6.50 an hour. A graduate of Wilde Lake High School, 18-year-old Newhall will be entering Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York this fall as a physics major. But instead of taking a summer job at a store or an office, Newhall is one of 15 Howard County teens who opted to work at the Howard County Arts Council's summer camp, where she helps kids with art projects, play rehearsals and other activities.
NEWS
December 5, 2000
SUPPORTERS SAID annexing the Key property would have given Columbia a chance to grow and access to millions in new tax revenue. Opponents said annexation would drain time and resources needed from Columbia proper. The Columbia Council's decision to play a conservative game, rejecting annexation and its potential benefits, may have been prudent and commendable. Independence is a virtue. But one wonders if better bargainers on both sides couldn't have allowed independence while bringing home the bacon.
NEWS
September 27, 1999
WITH LOSSES of $1.5 million since 1986 -- more than $350,000 in the last three budget years alone -- the Columbia Horse Center hangs on by threads of tradition and remarkable concern for a tiny sliver of Columbia residents.No business could tolerate these losses. Of course, the horse center, supported by Columbia property assessments, isn't really a business. Some slack is afforded, and should be, to facilities and programs that serve the community. The problem here is that the community as a whole shows little interest in horses.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
The office of Coleen M. West, executive director of Howard County Arts Council, is dominated by a huge abstract oil painting that stands guard over the room. West's desk is a glorious mess: Papers, drawings and pamphlets for events sponsored by the arts council litter the desktop.With so much on her plate, West, 39, and the council's deputy director, Debbie Meyer, face an imposing task.The council's $660,000 annual budget must go a long way toward operating the county's Center for the Arts and funding exhibitions and programs.
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