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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
The Howard County Council faces a busy voting session this week before the August recess, taking up the master plan for growth, several charter changes and whether to allow voters to consider term limits for newly elected council members. The master plan, PlanHoward 2030, is a guide to issues that include environmental protection, housing, transportation, and the redevelopment of U.S. 1 and U.S. 40. Years in the works by the council, Planning Board, Department of Planning and Zoning, consultants and citizens, the nearly 200-page proposal takes stock of changes since General Plan 2000, updates that document and generally maintains existing policies.
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NEWS
September 30, 2014
Power reliability was a foreign concept just a few years ago. For years, many of us in Howard County suffered through power outage after power outage. We lost freezers full of food, stayed overnight in hotels and risked running generators to stay warm. Sometimes, as in the case of the derecho in June of 2012, we were without power for days and weeks. Things have been markedly better in the last year when it comes to power outages, and lest we forget, I wanted to remind everyone how this happened and why we owe our thanks to Councilwoman Courtney Watson.
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NEWS
June 18, 2014
Early voting has begun for the June 24 primary election. School is ending, summer vacations are starting and voter turnout is predicted to be low. As a busy mom, I am happy to have had the opportunity to vote early, and to vote for Wendy Royalty to represent District 1 on the Howard County Council. She is exactly the person we need to represent our community. Wendy is an engaged parent with two kids in the public schools and a lifelong history of community activism and she is ready to represent us, our families and our communities.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
Jon Weinstein, the District 1 Democratic candidate for the Howard County Council, tried to reassure the voting public that "nobody should be concerned" about the $9,000 in contributions linked to developer Don Reuwer ( "Howard developer uses 'LLC loophole' on Weinstein finance report," Sept. 4). I am most certainly not reassured. Learning that the Reuwer contributions constitute more than 16 percent of Mr. Weinstein's fundraising total makes me highly skeptical. Learning that another 38 percent comes from PACs (including the Home Builders PAC of Howard County and the police, fire and teachers' unions whose members will benefit from County Council votes)
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
Anyone thirsting for a Howard County winery tour will have to wait at least one more month to begin planning. Legislation to allow wineries in Howard County was tabled Monday night by the Howard County Council, the second consecutive year that the Ulman administration legislation has run into trouble. Council members who asked for the delay said more time is needed to iron out unresolved issues over relatively small preserved parcels of land in residential areas. Some worry they could attract too many people and too much traffic if used for wineries.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
The County Council's move to revise the county ethics laws makes Howard one of the first local governments to approve the new standards mandated by the General Assembly last year. The changes, approved Monday, provide more detail in the county ethics laws regarding gifts, financial disclosure statements and lobbying provisions. It also expands the role of the county's ethics commission, requiring it to maintain an annual report of lobbying activity. The bill bans former County Council members from lobbying on legislative issues for a year after leaving office, and prohibits former employees from bidding to do business with the county on a contract for which they helped write specifications.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
The Howard County Council's first public meeting since 2008 in its traditional quarters went off without a hitch Monday night, though some first-night jitters were evident. "It is weird," said Councilwoman Jen Terrasa, a North Laurel/Savage Democrat who was still trying to get used to the gleaming new finishes and fixtures after the 75-minute, lightly attended public hearing. Terrasa's office was crammed with blue plastic bins of materials that still need to be unpacked. The county government will be spending the next few weeks moving back to the George Howard Building in Ellicott City from temporary offices in Columbia.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2011
A bill to give six private, nonprofit swim clubs a tax break and three other measures arising from contentious zoning disputes over funeral home parking and allowing outdoor social events in rural, residential areas are due for introduction before the Howard County Council on Monday night. If approved, the swimming club bill would cost the county $52,828 in lost property taxes, according to a chart prepared for Councilwoman Courtney Watson, an Ellicott City Democrat who is the main sponsor.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
A plan to cluster development in one corner of historic Doughoregan Manor while preserving the rest of the once-vast Colonial estate received final, unanimous approval from the Howard County Council late Thursday. The complex plan would provide more than $19 million over two decades in agricultural preservation money to Camilla and Philip D. Carroll, descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrolton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. They have said they intend to use the money to restore the remainder of the 892-acre estate and keep it in the family.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
The County Council will wait until the end of the month to decide on a tax-relief measure for nonprofit swim clubs. But the five-member panel did unanimously approve an amendment that clarifies language in the pool bill to make it reflect existing state law. The credit would apply to clubs that use their facilities "exclusively to provide a recreational outlet for a local community," according to the amendment. Some officials had questions about whether the bill would conflict with state policy on credits for nonprofits.
NEWS
June 18, 2014
I believe that Jon Weinstein will provide the best leadership for Howard County Council District 1. First, Jon is fully committed to supporting the Howard County school system and the excellent police and fire departments. His commitment is clearly evidenced by the endorsements he received from the Howard County Education Association, the Howard County Police Officers Association and the Howard County Professional Fire Fighters. Additionally, Jon's background as a small business owner gives him firsthand knowledge of the issues faced by the business community.
NEWS
April 10, 2014
Last week, the media finally reported that the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance in Howard County needs updating, and even then only because the two county executive candidates started talking about it ( "County executive candidates to revisit public facilities requirements," April 4). The media has ignored until now what others have long been talking about. The current ordinance can slow development if elementary schools and nearby street intersections are not ready to handle the increased load.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com and Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | March 6, 2014
The Howard County Council approved legislation Wednesday to declare the Long Reach Village Center a blight zone, which will allow the county to purchase and redevelop portions of the property. The passage of the law, which declares the area "an urban renewal zone," is required for the county to purchase the property, because county code prohibits the government from owning and operating a commercial operation within its jurisdiction. The council passed the bill 4-1, with Greg Fox, the lone Republican on the council, voting against.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
When Raissa Howera was growing up in the Washington area, she took part in protests supporting independence for Ukraine, the land of her father's family. Such activism was typical, she said. Her adolescence was marked by frustration with the problems that trouble the world and a sense of helplessness to change it. Now, as an art teacher at Oakland Mills Middle School in Columbia, Howera inspires students' creativity with social justice and outreach projects. This year, her students are taking part in projects such as Empty Bowls, an anti-hunger initiative by the North Carolina-based nonprofit Imagine/RENDER Group.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | December 4, 2013
As the Howard County Council looks ahead to 2014, the last year its current members will serve together as they have since 2006, the body's two top leadership roles are coming full circle. On Dec. 2, the Council voted to elect Calvin Ball, of District 2, as its chairman and Courtney Watson, who represents District 1, as its vice chairwoman. Both Ball and Watson held their respective positions in the Council's first year together, from 2006 to 2007. "I think we have a history of working well together," Ball said of Watson.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
What is Rosa Bonheur? It is a unique, historic cemetery, established in 1935, off of Route 1 in Elkridge. Rosa Bonheur is named after the world renowned 19th-century French painter, Rosalie Bonheur, a lover of lover and painter of animals. Her works hang in many galleries including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Why should we care about Rosa Bonheur? It is said to be the first cemetery in the U.S. to allow people and their pets to be buried side by side. How big is the cemetery?
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | July 31, 2007
After weeks of debate, the Howard County Council unanimously approved yesterday an amended package of Ulman administration legislation intended to give environmentally friendly development a strong push. "I believe this county moved forward dramatically," County Executive Ken Ulman said after the vote. Greg Fox, the five-member council's lone Republican, disagreed, saying, "It was gutted to the point where it was responsible." Fox earlier tried to have the package tabled, saying the council needed more time to consider the complex legislation.
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