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NEWS
By Allison Eatough | June 2, 2014
From the outside, Belmont Manor and Historic Park in Elkridge hasn't changed much. The 68-acre estate is still home to the Georgian-style, stucco-on-brick manor house, built by Caleb Dorsey in 1738. It still has intricate gardens and rolling hills as far as the eye can see. But the house and its surrounding property are subtly evolving. For the first time in its almost 300-year history, Belmont is hosting public environmental and preservation programs. The Woodstock-based Howard County Conservancy began offering programs at the new Belmont Nature Center in May and will continue to do so year-round, says Meg Schumacher Boyd, the conservancy's executive director.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 22, 2014
Sunday, Aug. 24 School open house Beth Shalom Congregation will host an open house for its religious school at 4 p.m. at 8070 Harriet Tubman Lane in Columbia. Information: 410-531-5115. Monday, Aug. 25 Ask the Pharmacist Don Hamilton, pharmacist, will provide free counseling on prescriptions and other medical concerns at 11 a.m. at the Ellicott City Senior Center, 9401 Frederick Road in Ellicott City. You must be a member of the center. Information: 410-313-1421. Tuesday, Aug. 26 Nature's Song Parents and children ages 3 to 5 are invited to take a singing, dancing and hiking class at the Belmont Manor and Historic Park at 6555 Belmont Woods Road in Elkridge.
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NEWS
May 7, 2003
The Howard County Conservancy, a land trust whose headquarters is on 232 acres in Woodstock, is switching directors. Elizabeth J. Stoffel, who joined the conservancy five years ago, resigned and will leave next month. Lynne Nemeth, a Columbia consultant active in the local nonprofit community, has been named interim director. The conservancy, founded in 1990, has helped preserve more than 1,500 acres in Howard and will open an environmental education center next year.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
With its four terraces of thriving plants sloping down toward a babbling lily pond, Jim Duke's garden could certainly be considered a healing place. And that's precisely what the world-renowned botanist and author's Green Farmacy Garden is. Featuring 80 plots that showcase 300 plants for whatever ails you — from addictions to yeast infections and everything in between — the garden is a living catalog of herbal medicine. From 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, the Howard County Conservancy will sponsor a lecture and guided tour of the garden at the Fulton home Jim Duke shares with his wife, Peggy.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 22, 2005
The building is new, which means it instantly seems out of place, considering that nothing else on the property is less than two centuries old. Despite the incongruity, the structure on the 232-acre Mount Pleasant Farm in Woodstock is the doorway to the past and the future and, its owners hope, will instill the public with an understanding and appreciation of the environment and nature. That is a tall order for a structure not even 9,000 square feet and that from the outside resembles a barn, but the Howard County Conservancy is banking on the appeal of its new education center.
NEWS
January 24, 2010
National Geographic photographer George Grail's slide presentation, "Life on a Wharf Piling in the Chesapeake Bay," takes place at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Howard County Conservancy, 10520 Old Frederick Road in Woodstock. Discover techniques that animals develop for camouflage, reproduction and adaptation to changes in the tides and environment. Call 410-465-8877 or go to hcconservancy.org for more information.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
Howard County Conservancy, Preservation Howard County to present seminar Saturday The Howard County Conservancy and Preservation Howard County will present "Preservation Matters," a seminar about conservation and historic and forest conservation easements for landowners and financial advisers. The seminar will be held from 8:30 a.m. to noon Saturday at Glenelg Country School's Manor House, 12793 Folly Quarter Road, Glenelg. Experts will present information about easements and tax benefits, and landowners with property under easement will speak.
NEWS
April 15, 2004
The Howard County Conservancy will present its annual Earth Day Celebration from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 24 at its headquarters, Mount Pleasant, 10520 Old Frederick Road, in Woodstock. Participants, who should take a picnic lunch, can plant trees, clear invasive non-native species, clean up and mulch trails on the 232-acre nature reserve. An opportunity to hike on nature trails is planned. A bird walk is planned from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Tree-planting and cleanup will be from 9 a.m. to noon.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
Hospital auxiliary offers opportunities Howard County General Hospital's Volunteer Auxiliary offers a variety of opportunities. Volunteers are needed: In the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource and Image Center. Volunteers welcome clients and help them with Internet and library research, answer the phone and provide office support. Training is provided. Information: 410-740-5858. At Rave Review Consignment Shop, the auxiliary's upscale shop. The shop is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, noon to 8 p.m. Thursdays, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.
NEWS
By Fay Lande and Fay Lande,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman and Howard County Conservancy President Ann Holmes Jones have signed a memorandum of understanding to work together to promote preservation easements on parcels of less than 50 acres. The small parcels, which may have significant conservation and ecological value to the county, can be attractive targets for development. They are referred to as "bad infill," causing consternation among neighbors who had not expected development in their neighborhoods. The project is also designed to protect Howard County property owners who are sometimes forced to sell their undeveloped land because its development potential has increased property taxes beyond their ability to pay. The preservation easements are designed to offer an alternative to owners and their neighbors.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | June 2, 2014
From the outside, Belmont Manor and Historic Park in Elkridge hasn't changed much. The 68-acre estate is still home to the Georgian-style, stucco-on-brick manor house, built by Caleb Dorsey in 1738. It still has intricate gardens and rolling hills as far as the eye can see. But the house and its surrounding property are subtly evolving. For the first time in its almost 300-year history, Belmont is hosting public environmental and preservation programs. The Woodstock-based Howard County Conservancy began offering programs at the new Belmont Nature Center in May and will continue to do so year-round, says Meg Schumacher Boyd, the conservancy's executive director.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | April 29, 2014
Everybody needs to recharge their batteries once in a while - to get away, slow down, take a few deep breaths. But not everybody wants to do it the same way. Some want to be pampered in luxury. Others would rather wander through wooded trails. Others could think of nothing better than guided spiritual retreat with like-minded pilgrims. Fortunately, you can find any of these options in Howard County, where a variety of facilities offer an array of retreat spaces for the weary, burned-out seeker of solace.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
For 23 years, the Howard County Conservancy has been a staple in the county's western landscape, a sprawling, 232-acre farm in Woodstock that, on any given day, is teeming with schoolchildren or outdoor enthusiasts. Yet the eastern portion of Howard — namely the towns of Elkridge and Jessup — have sometimes seemed like a distant world for conservancy officials to attract. That might be about to change, though, as the nonprofit conservancy will have an opportunity to extend its reach to the east.
EXPLORE
By Cassie Felch | May 16, 2013
In April, the first-graders from Daisy Troop 2484, out of West Friendship Elementary School, earned their Orange Learning Petal by studying ways in which they can act responsibly. They underscored the lesson with a trip to Triadelphia Veterinary Clinic in Glenelg, where they met with Dr. Susan Oltman. Oltman discussed the importance of proper diet and exercise for pets, and she showed the girls her surgery room and some X-rays. The troop had a memorable visit, including what student Gracie Hargrove called the best part — getting to see a lizard.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
A second straight winter of unnaturally warm weather so far in Central Maryland is extending the life of a handful of crops at one Howard County farm and forcing a rite of spring to occur early. Only last week on the rolling pastures of Sharp's at Waterford Farm in Brookeville, lambs cavorted near their mothers. Ears of viable popcorn lay scattered amid flattened, yellowed cornstalks. Nearby, brussels sprouts remained ripe for the picking. Still, even in the mildest of these colder months, farm-fresh foods remain scarce.
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, Baltimore Sun Media Group | December 1, 2012
Wedding day: Oct. 27, 2012 Her story: Katy Ekey, 29, grew up in Abingdon. She is a software developer for SAIC (Science Applications International Corp.). Her mom, Penny Ekey, is a retired seventh-grade English teacher at Edgewood Middle School, and her dad, Bill Ekey, was a principal at Bel Air and C. Milton Wright high schools and the director of secondary education for the Harford County public school system. He is currently the director for institutional research at Harford Community College.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2002
In a rare victory for preservationists, an Ellicott City estate that once belonged to one of Howard County's oldest families will forever remain a green and tree-lined glimpse of times past instead of becoming the site of a large 21st- century development. The owner of Keewaydin, a 10.2-acre homestead a mile from Main Street, has donated an easement to Howard County Conservancy that prevents further development on the land. It's a surprising reversal that illustrates the possibility of preservation - even in Howard County, where land values are continuously escalating.
NEWS
March 3, 2004
Marriage equity for gays, lesbians to be PFLAG topic The Howard County chapter of PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) will hold a town hall meeting to discuss marriage equality for gay and lesbian couples at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Owen Brown Interfaith Center, 7246 Cradlerock Way, Columbia. Jean Moon will be the moderator for a panel discussion that will include Rabbi Sonya Starr, the Rev. Paige Getty, County Councilman Guy Guzzone, Dan Furmansky of Equality Maryland, a lesbian couple and a gay couple.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
With its triangular, armored head, bulging eyes and serrated forearms, the predator attacking its prey is a menacing sight. The Transformer-like creature on the computer screen in George Grall's home office is actually a Carolina mantis chowing down on a red-legged grasshopper. And the larger-than-life shot shows what the Ellicott City photographer does best: capture the inner workings of nature up close. Grall, a freelance photographer for National Geographic magazine for 23 years and staff photographer for the National Aquarium in Baltimore since 1984, will give a presentation Friday, Nov. 16, at the Howard County Conservancy on one of his favorite subjects: the reawakening of amphibians in vernal pools.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
With the weather leapfrogging fall's cheerful chill to winter's blustery bite, the warmest person at the Howard County Conservancy's fall festival Saturday was iron man Allen Dyer. The light from a brilliant fire illuminated the Ellicott City blacksmith, who pumped a huge bellows that fed the dancing flames. Then he spun a thin metal bar in his hands as he heated it until it glowed red. A rapt audience watched Dyer as he transformed the iron into a curved workshop tool, hammering, heating and hammering again until, satisfied, he dipped it into a bucket of water.
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