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By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
Howard Cable Television will increase rates for basic service by 5 percent Jan. 1 and for the first time will charge customers for its programming guide.The company will raise its basic service charge, which includes 40 channels, by $1.15 monthly, from $22.25 to $23.40. The guide will cost 99 cents a month for customers who choose to subscribe. Customers who get the premium movie channel, Home Box Office, will pay 3 percent more beginning next month, from $12.95 to $13.35.The company serves about 43,000 subscribers in the Ellicott City, Columbia, Laurel, Savage and Elkridge areas.
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NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2004
Barbara Kellner has been practicing, spending hours looking into a camera and carefully enunciating her syllables. The local historian was recently chosen to host Columbia's new cable TV program, Columbia Matters, and she is taking her duties seriously. She knows little about show business and rarely watches television, so she has spent recent mornings watching the Today show and studying Katie Couric for tips. "She does fine," Kellner said, but noted that Couric sometimes talks too much, leaving less time for her guests.
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | October 5, 1992
A man in a trench coat and a houndstooth hat sits at a desk, scribbling in a folder marked "Top Secret." A drum roll plays in the background."As I begin my mission," a voice-over starts, "I realize I must find out everything so that people can be told. That's the American Way and my way. For, you see, I am the County Spy."The man then leaps up and clasps a briefcase to his wrist with a pair of handcuffs. He darts through a tunnel, sprints across a barren field, climbs over boulders, unlocks a safe and, finally, splays himself across a brick wall and stares wide-eyed at the camera.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
Anna Freysz Cable has a lot of memories. She recalls her mother taking her camping at the age of 3. She recalls meeting Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president of the United States, at 8. She recalls at 10 reciting the Pledge of Allegiance for the first time.But as for last week, "Don't ask me what I did because I don't remember," Cable deadpans.Yesterday, Cable added one more year of memories as she celebrated her 104th birthday with about 50 friends, residents and staff of Winter Growth Day Care Center in Columbia's Village of Harper's Choice.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer PHC zrB | April 16, 1992
It worked with cable thieves in Baltimore County, so now Comcast Cable is taking its amnesty campaign to Howard County.Beginning May 1, cable thieves in Howard County can turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- to Comcast's offspring, Storer/Howard County Cable. The amnesty program will end June 16, when Comcast says it will start prosecuting cable thieves.The company, which has about 42,000 subscribers in the eastern half of the county, is owned by Storer Communications, which is a subsidiary of Comcast.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | January 3, 1993
Howard County cable pirates have one last chance to come clean.Storer/Howard Cable Television is offering a monthlong, no-questions-asked amnesty period until Jan. 31, to allow cable thieves to turn themselves in -- or risk prosecution."
NEWS
December 26, 1990
SUBSCRIBERS LOSE OUT IN NEW CABLE SHUFFLEFrom: Edward Franey Jr.Ellicott CityHoward Cable Television has notified its subscribers of a rate increase effective Jan. 1. This represents a 67 percent increase since 1986. They tout service improvement, but is it?Also, they are adding two new networks as part of the increase. Mr. Tom Beach, general manager, in a letter to his customers contained in the December issue of the Storer Cable Magazine states, "With the additions of these two stellar networks, Howard Cable increases its basic programming lineup offering a total of 34 networks for the basic cable price."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
About 1,350 Howard County residents avoided the risk of prosecution by calling Howard Cable Television before Sunday's amnesty deadline to report that they were receiving cable service illegally, a company spokesman said.Those who are discovered through an audit of the system to be receiving cable service without paying for it are at risk of prosecution within the next 30 to 45 days, said David H. Nevins, spokesman for Howard Cable TV.Lawyers for the company will review documentation of cable theft and decide which cases should be forwarded to the Howard County state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | September 30, 1992
They have their MTV, but they want more.How about Bravo and American Movie Classics? Or Home Team Sports without shelling out an extra $13.95 per month?Insisting the cable television company serving western Howard offers a superior product, a group of dissatisfied eastern Howard residents has united to press Howard Cable TV to improve the quality of its programming and service.The Alliance for Better Cable (ABC), formed in late August, says that Mid-Atlantic Cable of Western Howard County provides better programming at a lower cost, and that Howard Cable TV has been "unresponsive to individual subscriber requests for better service."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | October 20, 1992
The five-member County Council unanimously approved the transfer of Howard County Cable Television Associates Inc. stock to its parent company last night over the protest of dissatisfied customers.Two subscribers, speaking on behalf of a group called Alliance for Better Cable, wanted the council to use the stock transfer as leverage to get better service, more programming and cheaper rates.The council said it did not have authority to attach strings to the stock transfer, but was sure service would improve because of public pressure, if for no other reason.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | March 22, 1993
The County Council will try to decide tonight what to do about Mid-Atlantic Cable Co.'s inability to meet its deadlines.The company, which serves western Howard County, wants the council to again extend the deadlines established in its 1988 franchise agreement.The county's Cable Television Advisory Committee and Cable Administrator James W. O'Connor want the council to severely punish Mid-Atlantic by either revoking its franchise or fining it $300 a day.Whatever the council decides, the vote will not come officially until Wednesday, April 7, the council's next legislative session.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
About 1,350 Howard County residents avoided the risk of prosecution by calling Howard Cable Television before Sunday's amnesty deadline to report that they were receiving cable service illegally, a company spokesman said.Those who are discovered through an audit of the system to be receiving cable service without paying for it are at risk of prosecution within the next 30 to 45 days, said David H. Nevins, spokesman for Howard Cable TV.Lawyers for the company will review documentation of cable theft and decide which cases should be forwarded to the Howard County state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
The Howard Cable Television technician runs his hand-held "sniffer" near the wires of yet another broken cable TV box outside an apartment complex in Laurel.The sniffer, the Geiger counter of the cable TV industry, looks like a walkie-talkie. It emits a whir and sends the frequency detection meter swinging toward the red zone, indicating a conspicuous cable TV signal leakage.John Wade, Howard Cable TV audit coordinator, checks his master list of addresses in the company's service zone, which shows all current and previously disconnected subscribers and all residences that never have been hooked up. He discovers that two of the eight potential customers in the apartment building are receiving cable TV service illegally.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
Super Bowl Sunday this weekend could be followed by Blue Monday if Howard County residents who are illegally receiving cable television service don't 'fess up.Storer/Howard Cable Television is allowing those who have their homes hooked up for cable programming without paying for the service to turn themselves in to the company by Sunday with no questions asked and no risk of prosecution.But once the monthlong amnesty ends, Storer/Howard Cable TV pledges to prosecute those who are detected receiving cable illegally.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | January 3, 1993
Howard County cable pirates have one last chance to come clean.Storer/Howard Cable Television is offering a monthlong, no-questions-asked amnesty period until Jan. 31, to allow cable thieves to turn themselves in -- or risk prosecution."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
Howard Cable Television will increase rates for basic service by 5 percent Jan. 1 and for the first time will charge customers for its programming guide.The company will raise its basic service charge, which includes 40 channels, by $1.15 monthly, from $22.25 to $23.40. The guide will cost 99 cents a month for customers who choose to subscribe. Customers who get the premium movie channel, Home Box Office, will pay 3 percent more beginning next month, from $12.95 to $13.35.The company serves about 43,000 subscribers in the Ellicott City, Columbia, Laurel, Savage and Elkridge areas.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
The Howard Cable Television technician runs his hand-held "sniffer" near the wires of yet another broken cable TV box outside an apartment complex in Laurel.The sniffer, the Geiger counter of the cable TV industry, looks like a walkie-talkie. It emits a whir and sends the frequency detection meter swinging toward the red zone, indicating a conspicuous cable TV signal leakage.John Wade, Howard Cable TV audit coordinator, checks his master list of addresses in the company's service zone, which shows all current and previously disconnected subscribers and all residences that never have been hooked up. He discovers that two of the eight potential customers in the apartment building are receiving cable TV service illegally.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
Anna Freysz Cable has a lot of memories. She recalls her mother taking her camping at the age of 3. She recalls meeting Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president of the United States, at 8. She recalls at 10 reciting the Pledge of Allegiance for the first time.But as for last week, "Don't ask me what I did because I don't remember," Cable deadpans.Yesterday, Cable added one more year of memories as she celebrated her 104th birthday with about 50 friends, residents and staff of Winter Growth Day Care Center in Columbia's Village of Harper's Choice.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | October 20, 1992
The five-member County Council unanimously approved the transfer of Howard County Cable Television Associates Inc. stock to its parent company last night over the protest of dissatisfied customers.Two subscribers, speaking on behalf of a group called Alliance for Better Cable, wanted the council to use the stock transfer as leverage to get better service, more programming and cheaper rates.The council said it did not have authority to attach strings to the stock transfer, but was sure service would improve because of public pressure, if for no other reason.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | October 5, 1992
A man in a trench coat and a houndstooth hat sits at a desk, scribbling in a folder marked "Top Secret." A drum roll plays in the background."As I begin my mission," a voice-over starts, "I realize I must find out everything so that people can be told. That's the American Way and my way. For, you see, I am the County Spy."The man then leaps up and clasps a briefcase to his wrist with a pair of handcuffs. He darts through a tunnel, sprints across a barren field, climbs over boulders, unlocks a safe and, finally, splays himself across a brick wall and stares wide-eyed at the camera.
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