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Howard Baker

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NEWS
July 1, 2014
The recent passing of Howard Baker provides significant contrasts as to how scandals are dealt with today ("Notable deaths elsewhere," June 27). Forty years ago, this country was engulfed in the monumental scandal of Watergate. What was initially proclaimed to be a third-rate burglary turned into a constitutional crisis that ultimately resulted in the resignation of a disgraced President Richard Nixon. This was due to the efforts of many people, but a substantial factor in the outcome was the persistence and skill of Howard Baker, a Republican senator from Tennessee.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 7, 2014
At a time when the Republican Party needs a heavy dose of compromise to bring functionality back to government, one of its most admirable models of goodwill and working across the aisle has departed with the death at 88 last week of Howard Henry Baker Jr. of Tennessee. The state's first elected GOP senator, former Senate majority leader, Reagan White House chief of staff and presidential aspirant was a gentle throwback to the brand of moderate conservatism that got things done without breaking the china.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 7, 2014
At a time when the Republican Party needs a heavy dose of compromise to bring functionality back to government, one of its most admirable models of goodwill and working across the aisle has departed with the death at 88 last week of Howard Henry Baker Jr. of Tennessee. The state's first elected GOP senator, former Senate majority leader, Reagan White House chief of staff and presidential aspirant was a gentle throwback to the brand of moderate conservatism that got things done without breaking the china.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
I applaud Robert Erlandson's letter regarding the late Sen. Howard Baker and for speaking out on this issue ( "How would Sen. Howard Baker have responded to today's IRS scandal?" July 1). Sadly, many will attack him for making an honest observation and comparison to Watergate. The nature of today's discourse does not accept honest observation. That has been trumped by political agenda. President Richard Nixon stepped down rather than soil the office. He was held to a standard and accepted it. President Barack Obama takes responsibility for nothing.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
I applaud Robert Erlandson's letter regarding the late Sen. Howard Baker and for speaking out on this issue ( "How would Sen. Howard Baker have responded to today's IRS scandal?" July 1). Sadly, many will attack him for making an honest observation and comparison to Watergate. The nature of today's discourse does not accept honest observation. That has been trumped by political agenda. President Richard Nixon stepped down rather than soil the office. He was held to a standard and accepted it. President Barack Obama takes responsibility for nothing.
NEWS
August 4, 2003
On August 3, 2003, SAUL M. BAKER, loving husband of Wendy L. Baker (nee Liebman); loving son of Albert and the late Harriet Baker; beloved brother of Jay Baker of Rockville, MD, Howard Baker of Silver Spring, MD and Gina Baker of South Carolina. Services at Sol Levinson and Bros. Inc. 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Tuesday, August 5, at 11 A.M. Interment service private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to the Brian Zikmud-Fisher Foundation HLA Registry Foundation 70 Grand Ave. Suite 103 River Edge, NJ 07661-1900 or The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center 1100 Fairview Ave. NJ 5-200 P.O. Box 19024 Seattle, WA 98109-1024.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Just off the Senate floor, a small rank of senators and key aides walked together, somewhat solemnly, past the familiar Ohio Clock, went into the Howard Baker Room and sat down to try to figure out what had gone wrong in just a little over three hours.It was after 3 o'clock then, and the hopes they had had at noon were fading at a noticeable and fretful pace. They had less than three hours to make a strategic choice, one that they knew might scuttle Clarence Thomas' chances to be a Supreme Court justice.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 2, 1995
LAMAR ALEXANDER announced this week that he would become one more in a series of Tennessee politicians who wanted to be president.None yet has made it, and I predict he won't either.I shouldn't say "none." Back in the last century there were Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk and Andrew Johnson (all born in the Carolinas, by the way), but in modern times -- that is, the past 128 years -- no Tennessean has even come close.Let's roll the videotape:Sen. Estes Kefauver won the Democratic primaries in 1952 and came in second in 1956, but was not nominated either time.
NEWS
April 25, 1991
As Sherman Adams proved during the Eisenhower era, even the flintiest of New Englanders can succumb to the allure of the White House ego trip. The victim this time is the president's chief of staff, John Sununu, who has taken 77 flights on Air Force jets at a cost to the taxpayers of half a million dollars in pursuit of official and not-so-official matters.The first thing to understand about this inside-the-beltway scandal is that someone (perhaps even someone in the White House) had to rat on Mr. Sununu, who proudly is not one of Washington's more lovable characters.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 17, 1994
SEN. PAUL Sarbanes dropped by the Ivory Tower to talk about his re-election campaign.He asked editorial writers to consider the fact that when his Republican opponent, Bill Brock, was a senator from Tennessee in the 1970s, he missed 20 percent of the roll call votes. He, himself, however, almost always votes. He voted on 770 of 772 roll calls in the two years of this Congress. You could look it up.(I did. Sarbanes hasn't missed more than 9 percent of roll calls a year in his whole Senate career, and hasn't missed more than 1 percent in the last eight years.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
The recent passing of Howard Baker provides significant contrasts as to how scandals are dealt with today ("Notable deaths elsewhere," June 27). Forty years ago, this country was engulfed in the monumental scandal of Watergate. What was initially proclaimed to be a third-rate burglary turned into a constitutional crisis that ultimately resulted in the resignation of a disgraced President Richard Nixon. This was due to the efforts of many people, but a substantial factor in the outcome was the persistence and skill of Howard Baker, a Republican senator from Tennessee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matea Gold and Scott Collins and Matea Gold and Scott Collins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2005
Just because Fred Thompson has been squiring the new Supreme Court nominee around Capitol Hill doesn't mean he has given up greasepaint. Thompson, a Republican Party stalwart and U.S. senator from 1994 to 2003, is serving as an informal adviser to John G. Roberts Jr., the judge chosen last week by President Bush to replace Sandra Day O'Connor on the U.S. Supreme Court. But while tutoring Roberts on the finer points of Senate relations, Thompson, 62, will have to squirrel away some time to memorize lines.
NEWS
August 4, 2003
On August 3, 2003, SAUL M. BAKER, loving husband of Wendy L. Baker (nee Liebman); loving son of Albert and the late Harriet Baker; beloved brother of Jay Baker of Rockville, MD, Howard Baker of Silver Spring, MD and Gina Baker of South Carolina. Services at Sol Levinson and Bros. Inc. 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Tuesday, August 5, at 11 A.M. Interment service private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to the Brian Zikmud-Fisher Foundation HLA Registry Foundation 70 Grand Ave. Suite 103 River Edge, NJ 07661-1900 or The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center 1100 Fairview Ave. NJ 5-200 P.O. Box 19024 Seattle, WA 98109-1024.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 2, 1995
LAMAR ALEXANDER announced this week that he would become one more in a series of Tennessee politicians who wanted to be president.None yet has made it, and I predict he won't either.I shouldn't say "none." Back in the last century there were Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk and Andrew Johnson (all born in the Carolinas, by the way), but in modern times -- that is, the past 128 years -- no Tennessean has even come close.Let's roll the videotape:Sen. Estes Kefauver won the Democratic primaries in 1952 and came in second in 1956, but was not nominated either time.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 17, 1994
SEN. PAUL Sarbanes dropped by the Ivory Tower to talk about his re-election campaign.He asked editorial writers to consider the fact that when his Republican opponent, Bill Brock, was a senator from Tennessee in the 1970s, he missed 20 percent of the roll call votes. He, himself, however, almost always votes. He voted on 770 of 772 roll calls in the two years of this Congress. You could look it up.(I did. Sarbanes hasn't missed more than 9 percent of roll calls a year in his whole Senate career, and hasn't missed more than 1 percent in the last eight years.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | August 17, 1992
TO GET a handle on the miracle George Bush desperately wants from his buddy Jim Baker, go to the sports machine.Once there was a ball player so prodigiously gifted he not only won three World Series games as a pitcher, but later smacked 60 home runs -- all on a diet of beer, cigars, bimbos and hot `` dogs.There's never been a multi-talented athlete to match George Herman Ruth.That's the political equivalent of what Mr. Bush asks of Jim Baker: Be my Babe Ruth.When the president whistled Mr. Baker in from his secretary of state bullpen, he was demanding Ruth-style heroics: Pitch, hit homers, save a sinking franchise.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | August 17, 1992
TO GET a handle on the miracle George Bush desperately wants from his buddy Jim Baker, go to the sports machine.Once there was a ball player so prodigiously gifted he not only won three World Series games as a pitcher, but later smacked 60 home runs -- all on a diet of beer, cigars, bimbos and hot `` dogs.There's never been a multi-talented athlete to match George Herman Ruth.That's the political equivalent of what Mr. Bush asks of Jim Baker: Be my Babe Ruth.When the president whistled Mr. Baker in from his secretary of state bullpen, he was demanding Ruth-style heroics: Pitch, hit homers, save a sinking franchise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matea Gold and Scott Collins and Matea Gold and Scott Collins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2005
Just because Fred Thompson has been squiring the new Supreme Court nominee around Capitol Hill doesn't mean he has given up greasepaint. Thompson, a Republican Party stalwart and U.S. senator from 1994 to 2003, is serving as an informal adviser to John G. Roberts Jr., the judge chosen last week by President Bush to replace Sandra Day O'Connor on the U.S. Supreme Court. But while tutoring Roberts on the finer points of Senate relations, Thompson, 62, will have to squirrel away some time to memorize lines.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Just off the Senate floor, a small rank of senators and key aides walked together, somewhat solemnly, past the familiar Ohio Clock, went into the Howard Baker Room and sat down to try to figure out what had gone wrong in just a little over three hours.It was after 3 o'clock then, and the hopes they had had at noon were fading at a noticeable and fretful pace. They had less than three hours to make a strategic choice, one that they knew might scuttle Clarence Thomas' chances to be a Supreme Court justice.
NEWS
April 25, 1991
As Sherman Adams proved during the Eisenhower era, even the flintiest of New Englanders can succumb to the allure of the White House ego trip. The victim this time is the president's chief of staff, John Sununu, who has taken 77 flights on Air Force jets at a cost to the taxpayers of half a million dollars in pursuit of official and not-so-official matters.The first thing to understand about this inside-the-beltway scandal is that someone (perhaps even someone in the White House) had to rat on Mr. Sununu, who proudly is not one of Washington's more lovable characters.
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