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NEWS
September 20, 1993
James TyeskaOpera singer, teacherJames Tyeska, 43, a bass-baritone who was also a voice teacher at Sarah Lawrence College, died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome Sept. 5 at his home in New York City.Mr. Tyeska sang on the opera and concert stages. He was heard as Escamillo in the Peter Brook production of "La Tragedie de Carmen" at Lincoln Center, and as Malcolm X in "X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X" by Anthony Davis at the first American Music Theater Festival in Philadelphia.This year, he made his debut with the Deutsche Oper Berlin singing Porgy in "Porgy and Bess," was bass soloist in Verdi's "Requiem" with the Eastern Connecticut Symphony, and performed in concert with the Tulsa Philharmonic.
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FEATURES
August 23, 2000
In a possible antidote to the pop-culture hoopla happening on CBS with the "Survivor" finale (8 p.m.-10 p.m.) and reunion (10 p.m.-11 p.m.), PBS offers "The Houston Symphony: A Maestro's Farewell" (9:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67). In his 11 years with the Houston Symphony, music director Christoph Eschenbach was credited with taking it to a new level of excellence. This is exemplified in the program honoring Eschenbach's departure, in which the symphony performed Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra.
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FEATURES
August 23, 2000
In a possible antidote to the pop-culture hoopla happening on CBS with the "Survivor" finale (8 p.m.-10 p.m.) and reunion (10 p.m.-11 p.m.), PBS offers "The Houston Symphony: A Maestro's Farewell" (9:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67). In his 11 years with the Houston Symphony, music director Christoph Eschenbach was credited with taking it to a new level of excellence. This is exemplified in the program honoring Eschenbach's departure, in which the symphony performed Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 22, 1996
Richard Strauss, "Four Last Songs," five songs for soprano and orchestra and "Rosenkavalier" Suite, performed by soprano Renee Fleming (in the songs), the Houston Symphony, Christoph Eschenbach conducting (BMG Classics 09026-68539-2); Strauss, "Four Last Songs," two songs for soprano and orchestra and 13 songs for soprano and piano, performed by soprano Barbara Hendricks, the Philadelphia Orchestra and Wolfgang Sawallisch, conductor and pianist (EMI Classics 5 55594):These competing versions of Richard Strauss' autumnal "Four Last Songs" -- in which the upstart Houston Symphony clearly outplays the revered Philadelphia Orchestra -- demonstrate that traditional notions of orchestral hierarchy need revision.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | July 19, 1991
These are eventful times in the life of Gisele Ben-Dor, the Israeli conductor who was recently named music director of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra.In the past five months, she has been appointed totwo conducting posts and has resigned from another.At her home in Houston, she is busily packing up scores, records,tapes, compact discs and her Steinway piano in preparation for a move to New Jersey with her engineer husband, Eli, and their 8-year-old son, Roy.And when she assumes the podium for ASO's season-opener this October, she'll be eight months pregnant with her second child.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 22, 1996
Richard Strauss, "Four Last Songs," five songs for soprano and orchestra and "Rosenkavalier" Suite, performed by soprano Renee Fleming (in the songs), the Houston Symphony, Christoph Eschenbach conducting (BMG Classics 09026-68539-2); Strauss, "Four Last Songs," two songs for soprano and orchestra and 13 songs for soprano and piano, performed by soprano Barbara Hendricks, the Philadelphia Orchestra and Wolfgang Sawallisch, conductor and pianist (EMI Classics 5 55594):These competing versions of Richard Strauss' autumnal "Four Last Songs" -- in which the upstart Houston Symphony clearly outplays the revered Philadelphia Orchestra -- demonstrate that traditional notions of orchestral hierarchy need revision.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | February 10, 1995
With Perlmans, Zuckermans, Lins, Midoris, Shahams and Bells already on hand, and scads of other first-class fiddlers popping up even as we speak, we truly live in a golden age of violin playing.Classical music lovers are blessed by an embarrassment of riches. Not only have impeccably high standards become the norm in concert halls, but the repertoire has expanded as well. After all, you can't perform the Beethoven Concerto every night.And how many Bruch and Mendelssohn concertos do even the most rabid violin aficionados need in their CD collections?
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | June 5, 1991
Gisele Ben-Dor, resident conductor of the Houston Symphony, has beenselected as the new music director of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra.A native of Uruguay whose parents emigrated to Israel when shewas a teen-ager, Ben-Dor is also the conductor of Boston's Pro Arte Orchestra, a 40-member ensemble that performs an annual four-concert season at Harvard University.She has signed a multiyear contract with the Annapolis Symphony.Of the six finalists for the position, Ben-Dor, a graduate of the Yale School of Music, is the most established internationally.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | May 21, 2000
Kids are taking over the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra this week. No, it's not for a children's concert. And they aren't technically kids, either. But, it's still something of a novelty to find a 20-year-old fiddler and a 24-year-old conductor sharing the BSO stage. Baltimore's own Hilary Hahn, whose prodigious gifts as a violinist are well chronicled (she made her BSO debut at 12), will take on the Brahms Concerto, with its pulsating lyricism and swaggering gestures. She'll be partnered on the podium by Englishman Daniel Harding, who made his conducting debut at 18 with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra and, two years later, led the Berlin Philharmonic and became the youngest person ever to conduct the BBC Proms.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | June 5, 1991
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra has hired as its new music director Giselle Ben-Dor, the resident conductor of the Houston Symphony Orchestra, a native of Uruguay, citizen of Israel and American resident since 1980.Ben-Dor got a "very strong" favorable evaluation by the 85 symphony members after being a guest conductor Feb. 9-10, said Pat Edwards, executive director. Four other candidates were Karen Deal, resident conductor; Randall Fleischer, Gary Schneider and Christopher Kendall. A sixth, David Miller, was recently chosen to head the Albany Orchestra.
NEWS
September 20, 1993
James TyeskaOpera singer, teacherJames Tyeska, 43, a bass-baritone who was also a voice teacher at Sarah Lawrence College, died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome Sept. 5 at his home in New York City.Mr. Tyeska sang on the opera and concert stages. He was heard as Escamillo in the Peter Brook production of "La Tragedie de Carmen" at Lincoln Center, and as Malcolm X in "X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X" by Anthony Davis at the first American Music Theater Festival in Philadelphia.This year, he made his debut with the Deutsche Oper Berlin singing Porgy in "Porgy and Bess," was bass soloist in Verdi's "Requiem" with the Eastern Connecticut Symphony, and performed in concert with the Tulsa Philharmonic.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | July 19, 1991
These are eventful times in the life of Gisele Ben-Dor, the Israeli conductor who was recently named music director of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra.In the past five months, she has been appointed totwo conducting posts and has resigned from another.At her home in Houston, she is busily packing up scores, records,tapes, compact discs and her Steinway piano in preparation for a move to New Jersey with her engineer husband, Eli, and their 8-year-old son, Roy.And when she assumes the podium for ASO's season-opener this October, she'll be eight months pregnant with her second child.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2005
Sounds of winter The lowdown -- With the weather getting nippier, it's a perfect time to enjoy the charms of Tchaikovsky's under-appreciated Symphony No. 1, nicknamed "Winter Dreams." The tuneful, vividly orchestrated score easily suggests wintry scenes, although it's just as easily enjoyed as pure, abstract music. You can hear the piece, along with vividly colored scores by Stephen Albert (with a title like Tapioca Pudding, it's got to be colorful) and Edouard Lalo (his Symphonie Espagnol)
NEWS
July 20, 2006
John Fenton Mathews, who had held the principal bass chair in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra for a quarter-century, died of leukemia July 10 at his home in West Brooklin, Maine. The former Bolton Hill resident was 80. Born in Birmingham, Mich., he studied the double bass privately with Gaston Brohan, principal double bassist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and attended summer music camp at Interlochen in Michigan. After two years of study, he took his first symphony job in Dallas.
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