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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1994
A group of public housing residents picketed city housing authority offices yesterday, demanding that the agency rescind the transfer of a popular administrator.The 13 residents, from Latrobe Homes in East Baltimore, want former manager Robin Mack reinstated at the 701-unit low-rise complex at 900 E. Madison St. Ms. Mack was transferred March 1 to the Broadway senior citizen high-rise in a management swap that sent Broadway manager Henry Johnson to Latrobe.Carrying picket signs and chanting, "What do we want?
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Annapolis settled a tenant dispute Thursday agreeing to pay $82,500 to a pastry shop formerly housed in the Market House. A joint statement from the city and the pastry shop said the deal is the last step in closing "a disappointing" chapter in the history of the city-owned landmark at City Dock. Mayor Joshua Cohen said the settlement will have no effect on the planned spring reopening date. The settlement was reached the same week the civil case filed by Vaccaro's Italian Pastry Shop, Inc. was to set to go to trial.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
A controversial new lease requiring Baltimore public housing tenants to mow lawns, tutor students and do other volunteer work will be delayed for at least a month, so residents can renegotiate its terms.The delay was set yesterday at a meeting among Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, Housing Authority Executive Director Daniel P. Henson III and several residents -- a week after public housing commissioners unanimously approved the lease over the angry cries of tenants.The lease, originally scheduled to take effect next month, will not be ready before February, Mr. Henson said after the meeting.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
Three state lawmakers from Baltimore are calling on Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to find a way for the city's housing authority to pay nearly $12 million in lead-poisoning judgments against it, disputing her claim that "it is not possible" to pay and suggesting the agency could borrow the money if necessary. In a stern letter to the mayor, the legislators criticize the Housing Authority of Baltimore City for using "frivolous and delaying legal tactics" to avoid paying the judgments — even in cases where the authority agreed to the amount.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
The story at Somerset Homes, Baltimore's oldest public housing project, is simple: The old guard and the Tenant Council got mad. Last week, the residents of this East Baltimore complex took city housing officials to task for ignoring their long-standing complaints. Maintenance was lax and inadequate, they said, apartments needed repair, and drug dealing was virtually unchallenged. Officials from the Housing Authority of Baltimore City did not disagree. They readily acknowledged the problems at Somerset and vowed a rapid response.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
Annie Arrington, a long-time resident of East Baltimore's Claremont Homes, says what her public housing project needs more than anything else is police protection from the drug dealers who all but run the place."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2001
From Texas to North Carolina to California, many former residents of blighted public housing projects are discovering they may not be welcome when their old homes are replaced by bright new developments. By design, the crowded, crime-ridden high-rises are being replaced in most cases by garden-style apartments that house only a fraction of the original residents. It is all part of HOPE VI, a program administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The highly praised program, created nearly a decade ago, has been credited with giving new life to cities and public housing.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2002
An abandoned and neglected Baltimore firehouse at 316 S. Caroline St. has become the center of a political tug-of-war between public housing tenants and city officials eager to expand the tax base. Tenant council leaders of the 688-unit Clarence Perkins Homes complex said they will march on the Department of Housing and Community Development's headquarters today to press their point that they want the firehouse for a community center. The current center, behind the firehouse, is too small for the additional programs they say they want to bring to their East Baltimore neighborhood.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | August 31, 1991
In an effort to spur political activity among public housing tenants, the Baltimore Housing Authority's resident advisory board was to endorse candidates running for city offices yesterday -- the first time the group had ever taken a political stand.But the tenants group was told it would have to withdraw its endorsements because it operates on federal funds and therefore is banned from engaging in political activity."That was a mistake," said Zack Germroth, a spokesman for the Baltimore Housing Authority.
NEWS
July 27, 1996
JUDGE MARVIN J. Garbis of the U.S. District Court has already decided that a special master should be named as part of the settlement of the American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit over public housing in Baltimore. The judge still must choose a special master and define his responsibilities. Baltimore Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson would like that role to be as limited as possible.That would be a mistake. This special master must be more than an ombudsman for complaints from suburban residents disgruntled by the movement of public housing tenants to the counties, or for housing tenants themselves.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
Despite opposition from some public housing residents, the Annapolis City Council passed a resolution Monday that gives the city's housing authority approval to proceed with a plan to redevelop the Obery Court public housing complex. The project, which would use more than $12 million in state, county and private funding, has drawn criticism from many public housing tenants, several of whom spoke out against the resolution at the City Council meeting before the vote. The residents feared that after demolition and reconstruction of the rental units, some would not be able to move back, attributing their concerns in part to mistrust of housing authority officials, whom they say did not give them sufficient input in planning the project.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | January 29, 2008
The smell of filth filled the small apartment. The couches were overturned, along with a washing machine, and the floors were streaked with grime. A bra lay on the floor in front of Shirley Gilbert's refrigerator. The underwear wasn't hers. Neither, she says, was the mess that drug dealers and junkies left for her to clean up in her one-bedroom apartment in the Latrobe public housing community in East Baltimore. "It's not safe here," Gilbert said. "They come in and do what they want to do. They bust the window.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2007
The Annapolis housing authority added two more neighborhoods to its redevelopment list this week in a plan that calls for setting aside homes for ownership - a move that has some residents fearing permanent displacement. Annapolis Gardens and Bowman Court, off Admiral Drive, will see major renovations, increased security and improved landscaping by mid-2009. The agency plans to redo two Clay Street public housing communities by 2014. It expects to rehabilitate College Creek Terrace and raze and rebuild Obery Court.
NEWS
January 7, 2005
DEMOLISHING Baltimore's decrepit and dangerous public housing high-rises was relatively swift. A series of dynamite charges and, in a matter of seconds, each came down in a spectacular plume of dust and decay, the last of four falling in 2001. But providing safe, affordable replacement housing for many of the tenants has been anything but swift. More to the point, their housing should not be restricted to a single Baltimore neighborhood, nor even to the city itself. This is why a federal judge's ruling yesterday in a 10-year-old housing discrimination lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union was so welcome.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2005
At the Annapolis Market House yesterday, the bright sun by City Dock gave little comfort to the last food-stand operators clearing out their wares and stations - smarting at being evicted by City Hall as their leases expired last weekend. In the desolate shell of the plain waterfront building, even merchants who are moving to desirable sites nearby said things would never be the same when they no longer are under the same roof. This month, a city contractor will begin overhauling the historic 1858 structure so officials can lease it to Dean & DeLuca, an upscale New York-based gourmet grocery store.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Residents of Baltimore's public housing high-rises say they feel less secure because of a drop in the number of building monitors, who are supposed to watch who comes and goes at the facilities. Since last week, about half of the high-rises have not had monitors for eight hours a day. There are 18 developments, with 21 entrances normally monitored. Eleven of them have been unguarded from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. "Anyone and everyone can come through that door," said Esther Hall, president of the tenant council at Wyman House, a 16-story, 192-unit building in Wyman Park.
NEWS
By Newsday | December 21, 1990
A nationwide federal program to evict public housing tenants suspected of drug activity has been stopped by a federal judge who says such evictions without prior notice "constitute a harm of major proportions."U.S. District Court Judge Richard L. Williams in Richmond, Va., yesterday permanently barred the government from taking such eviction actions and also ordered that all public housing tenants be sent letters saying they may not be evicted without prior notice and a hearing unless the government can prove that a serious emergency exists.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2003
The city's segregated pockets of concentrated poverty can be erased only by extending public housing to Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties, a U.S. District judge declared yesterday. However, U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis -- who is hearing a lawsuit filed in 1995 by public housing tenants claiming that Baltimore and federal housing policies have resulted in racial discrimination -- indicated that because those suburban counties are not part of the suit, such a remedy would be difficult to accomplish.
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