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NEWS
October 21, 2009
Is Baltimore trying to drive out the middle class? It seems as though Baltimore City employees, whose salaries are paid by the hard-earned dollars of the city's taxpayers (which can only mean gainfully employed people), are actually trying to make it too costly and too much of a royal pain in the neck to live in the city. In the last couple of months, I have been a witness to so many examples of absurdities that can only lead me to this conclusion, especially when my experiences are extrapolated to other residents of the city.
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NEWS
By Robert Wilson | July 12, 1999
YOU LIVE in a battered neighborhood in an aging city -- Buffalo or Baltimore, Hartford, Conn., or Detroit. Next door or down the street is an abandoned house where crack is being sold or squatters congregate or fires are set. If you complain, the chances are pretty good that your local government will respond by tearing down the house, using federal grants from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, state demolition money or even city revenue.Obviously...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | October 5, 2006
The impending military base realignment looms as Baltimore's opportunity to boost its population and contribute to the reversal in recent years of the decades-long flight of residents to the suburbs. The plan, also known as Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC), could bring as many as 40,000 jobs to Maryland as a result of expansions mainly at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County and Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County. While much attention has been focused on expanding housing and improving infrastructure in suburban counties, Baltimore could figure prominently in the BRAC process by virtue of its housing stock, public transit and cultural amenities, business and government officials said.
NEWS
May 13, 1992
Housing study unveiledTo improve the availability of affordable housing in Carroll, a study conducted by a Baltimore firm has recommended that the county zone more land for multifamily residential development in areas surrounding towns.Conducted by Legg Mason Realty Group Inc., the study summarized Carroll's housing growth during the decade from 1970 to 1980, current housing efforts and unmet housing needs, such as affordable housing.Overall, new housing construction during that decade improved the quality of the county's housing units; housing prices and rents have increased, while vacancy levels have declined; and the housing supply has not kept pace with household growth, said Jerry L. Doctrow, vice president of research services.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
Baltimore has thousands of vacant, dilapidated and abandoned houses that create serious health, safety and quality-of-life hazards for city residents. The buildings are eyesores that raise the risk of fires and structural collapses, encourage criminal activity, reduce the attractiveness of neighborhoods to potential buyers and lower property values. They're also the greatest source of urban blight, sucking the life out of communities and making every other social and economic reconstruction task there more difficult.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2009
Found just minutes from major thoroughfares such as Interstate 95 and U.S. 40 is Belcamp, a tucked-away, quiet retreat in Harford County. Within Belcamp is the large planned community of Riverside, a neighborhood that Chris Henn said she moved to almost 25 years ago because at the time it offered affordable housing in a pleasant, family-friendly setting. "It still does," said Henn, the president of the Riverside Community Association. "It's a great place to raise a family. I know a lot of my neighbors.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,sun reporter | May 18, 2008
The only thing missing from Owings Mills New Town is the lake. Back in the 1980s, the developers' vision for the newly designated growth area in Owings Mills included a man-made lake. When an Army Corps of Engineers study concluded the lake would have a negative environmental impact, not only did it cancel plans for the lake, it also killed the community's original name: Lakeside. However, the central road through the area had already been dedicated, so today New Town residents traverse Lakeside Boulevard to get to their homes and to visit shops.
NEWS
July 8, 2002
IT HAS BEEN a remarkable transformation. In six years, Baltimore has replaced most of its crime-ridden public housing high-rises with attractive, private townhouse communities. Homeowners now occupy units next to subsidized tenants. There are few telltale signs of income differentials. Similar sweeping changes have occurred in many other big cities under the federal government's decade-old Hope VI program. But few original tenants have benefited. Instead, the spanking new units have gone to people with jobs (who can afford higher rents)
NEWS
May 11, 2005
WITH 14,000 FAMILIES on a waiting list for a federally funded rent-assistance program, it is unfortunate that the Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC) allowed portions of its allotted rental vouchers to go unused, triggering a permanent reduction in the total number of vouchers paid for by the federal government this year and in subsequent years. What's worse is that the cut in voucher funding comes at a time when federal support for affordable and public housing programs nationwide is being slashed by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
BUSINESS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | October 28, 2007
Nestled on the banks of the Patapsco River, Historic Ellicott City has served many purposes. Founded in 1771 by the Ellicott brothers, Joseph, Andrew and John, the town existed for its milling and flour production. During the Civil War, it was a pivotal Union outpost. Today, the picturesque downtown is a popular tourist spot and a must-visit for history buffs and window shoppers. Here, new shops open quickly after the old ones close. And other than the occasional housing renovation, the look and feel of the town remains fairly constant.
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