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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2004
Carroll County housing officials want an updated picture of what kind of homes are available -- from mansions to overcrowded substandard apartments -- as well as what kind of homes people want and can afford. This study of housing stock and needs will range from young people new to the work force who want to stay in the area to large families in need of assistance, said Jolene G. Sullivan, director of the county's Department of Citizen Services. The county has changed considerably since the last study more than 10 years ago, she said.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | March 30, 2008
The 1830s saw a "Franklin Towne" planned by William H. Freeman, a prominent Baltimore landowner -- but it didn't get off the paper because of a bank failure. Still, a leafy hamlet has grown up around what started as a gristmill along Dead Run, where Freeman envisioned his suburban oasis. Parts of Franklintown are recognized as local and national historic districts, and the former millhouse is a private home. The neighborhood is hidden between Leakin Park to the east and Security Boulevard to the west, just north of the tip of Interstate 70. Mostly in the city, Franklintown straddles the Baltimore City-Baltimore County line.
BUSINESS
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
A charming riverfront town that traces its roots back to Captain John Smith, Havre de Grace once vied with Washington, D.C., for the seat of the U.S. capital. Today, the quaint city, which again nabbed the national spotlight in the 1920s for its horse racing prestige, could never be mistaken for a hub of political activity. Quirky, cozy shops line Washington Street, downtown Havre de Grace's version of Main Street. The town projects a 1950s-era ambience, quietly luring visitors with antiques, books and homemade candy.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
City officials took the head of the nation's Department of Housing and Urban Development on a tour Wednesday of Barclay to show him work by a private developer they say is starting to turn around the small, impoverished neighborhood in the middle of the city. It's a story of a public-private partnership about to start a new chapter, now that the company is one of 11 developers slated to take over some of the city's public housing units. HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, in town to announce the award of $1.8 billion in capital funds for the nation's public housing, said he expects Baltimore to be a model for the new program, which is designed to allow deteriorating public units to access previously off-limits sources of money for repair.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
Tucked behind busy West Baltimore intersections lies a tiny neighborhood where one home caught the public eye this spring. That's because the homeowner offered his broad, flat front yard as the Baltimore site of "Edible Estates," the project that challenges people to replace their front lawns with gardens of organic veggies, fruits and herbs. Clarence Ridgley's bountiful yard stands out on a street of tidy brick and clapboard houses. And although none of his neighbors in the Callaway-Garrison community followed his lead, though plenty are enjoying his homegrown bounty.
BUSINESS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2008
In March 1956, the small community of Ferndale still had enough rural flavor that James Lacy could fish and hunt there after his family moved to the Glen Burnie subdivision from Baltimore. Lacy, now 65, said it wasn't long before the neighborhood began to grow. Today, Ferndale is an established suburban community with few vacant lots and steady traffic along its main artery, Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard. Lacy lives within blocks of his parents' home, where his brother lives now. Many of the friends he went to school with also settled in the area.
NEWS
October 21, 2009
Is Baltimore trying to drive out the middle class? It seems as though Baltimore City employees, whose salaries are paid by the hard-earned dollars of the city's taxpayers (which can only mean gainfully employed people), are actually trying to make it too costly and too much of a royal pain in the neck to live in the city. In the last couple of months, I have been a witness to so many examples of absurdities that can only lead me to this conclusion, especially when my experiences are extrapolated to other residents of the city.
NEWS
By Robert Wilson | July 12, 1999
YOU LIVE in a battered neighborhood in an aging city -- Buffalo or Baltimore, Hartford, Conn., or Detroit. Next door or down the street is an abandoned house where crack is being sold or squatters congregate or fires are set. If you complain, the chances are pretty good that your local government will respond by tearing down the house, using federal grants from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, state demolition money or even city revenue.Obviously...
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