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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2004
Carroll County housing officials want an updated picture of what kind of homes are available -- from mansions to overcrowded substandard apartments -- as well as what kind of homes people want and can afford. This study of housing stock and needs will range from young people new to the work force who want to stay in the area to large families in need of assistance, said Jolene G. Sullivan, director of the county's Department of Citizen Services. The county has changed considerably since the last study more than 10 years ago, she said.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2010
The original brochure advertising the neighborhood of Thornleigh in the Riderwood area of west Towson described the community as "a new way of living," boasting that "never before has such an area been developed with so much care and foresight. " More than 50 years later that feeling of a traditional 1950s neighborhood, built by developer James Keelty & Co., remains intact. "It's an old-school type of neighborhood," said Chris Kennedy, president of the Thornleigh Improvement Association.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | March 30, 2008
The 1830s saw a "Franklin Towne" planned by William H. Freeman, a prominent Baltimore landowner -- but it didn't get off the paper because of a bank failure. Still, a leafy hamlet has grown up around what started as a gristmill along Dead Run, where Freeman envisioned his suburban oasis. Parts of Franklintown are recognized as local and national historic districts, and the former millhouse is a private home. The neighborhood is hidden between Leakin Park to the east and Security Boulevard to the west, just north of the tip of Interstate 70. Mostly in the city, Franklintown straddles the Baltimore City-Baltimore County line.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
Souvenir-hunting tourists wander the Historic District of Annapolis, but the neighborhood also has a community of several thousand residents, people who live in more than 1,300 private homes and are accustomed to directing visitors to City Dock. Most houses in the oldest part of a city that has passed its 300th birthday are old, but newer ones are built to blend in. Exterior work within the Annapolis Historic District must meet the standards of the Annapolis Historic Preservation Commission.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | March 23, 2008
Originally built for families of the 1950s, Campus Hills is still attracting residents with its well laid-out floor plans, tucked-away privacy and proximity to Towson and Interstate 695. "It was considered a premier neighborhood when it was built," said Ed Vojik, the past president of the Campus Hills Community Association and a resident of the neighborhood for almost 30 years. "People that move in tend to stay a long time." Developers designed the neighborhood of 369 homes, located behind Goucher College, with the most modern amenities of the time such as dishwashers, electric kitchens and family rooms.
BUSINESS
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
A charming riverfront town that traces its roots back to Captain John Smith, Havre de Grace once vied with Washington, D.C., for the seat of the U.S. capital. Today, the quaint city, which again nabbed the national spotlight in the 1920s for its horse racing prestige, could never be mistaken for a hub of political activity. Quirky, cozy shops line Washington Street, downtown Havre de Grace's version of Main Street. The town projects a 1950s-era ambience, quietly luring visitors with antiques, books and homemade candy.
NEWS
October 21, 2009
Is Baltimore trying to drive out the middle class? It seems as though Baltimore City employees, whose salaries are paid by the hard-earned dollars of the city's taxpayers (which can only mean gainfully employed people), are actually trying to make it too costly and too much of a royal pain in the neck to live in the city. In the last couple of months, I have been a witness to so many examples of absurdities that can only lead me to this conclusion, especially when my experiences are extrapolated to other residents of the city.
NEWS
May 13, 1992
Housing study unveiledTo improve the availability of affordable housing in Carroll, a study conducted by a Baltimore firm has recommended that the county zone more land for multifamily residential development in areas surrounding towns.Conducted by Legg Mason Realty Group Inc., the study summarized Carroll's housing growth during the decade from 1970 to 1980, current housing efforts and unmet housing needs, such as affordable housing.Overall, new housing construction during that decade improved the quality of the county's housing units; housing prices and rents have increased, while vacancy levels have declined; and the housing supply has not kept pace with household growth, said Jerry L. Doctrow, vice president of research services.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | October 5, 2006
The impending military base realignment looms as Baltimore's opportunity to boost its population and contribute to the reversal in recent years of the decades-long flight of residents to the suburbs. The plan, also known as Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC), could bring as many as 40,000 jobs to Maryland as a result of expansions mainly at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County and Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County. While much attention has been focused on expanding housing and improving infrastructure in suburban counties, Baltimore could figure prominently in the BRAC process by virtue of its housing stock, public transit and cultural amenities, business and government officials said.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
Baltimore has thousands of vacant, dilapidated and abandoned houses that create serious health, safety and quality-of-life hazards for city residents. The buildings are eyesores that raise the risk of fires and structural collapses, encourage criminal activity, reduce the attractiveness of neighborhoods to potential buyers and lower property values. They're also the greatest source of urban blight, sucking the life out of communities and making every other social and economic reconstruction task there more difficult.
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