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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 23, 2005
NEW ORLEANS -- As crews begin inspecting thousands of rotting houses and preservationists begin efforts to save them, city and federal officials say that 30,000 to 50,000 of the city's houses will probably have to be demolished. That number, though smaller than in some earlier predictions, nonetheless represents up to a quarter of the city's housing stock. A few weeks from now, when giant track excavators begin tearing into homes that once sheltered families and nest eggs, the city will experience one of the most painful moments of its ordeal.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
City officials took the head of the nation's Department of Housing and Urban Development on a tour Wednesday of Barclay to show him work by a private developer they say is starting to turn around the small, impoverished neighborhood in the middle of the city. It's a story of a public-private partnership about to start a new chapter, now that the company is one of 11 developers slated to take over some of the city's public housing units. HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, in town to announce the award of $1.8 billion in capital funds for the nation's public housing, said he expects Baltimore to be a model for the new program, which is designed to allow deteriorating public units to access previously off-limits sources of money for repair.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2005
Hit the streets in Baltimore and the evidence isn't hard to find. The number of residential rehabilitation permits has nearly doubled in the past five years, pushed upward by the quickly rising tide of housing values. Rehabbers took out 21,658 permits in the fiscal year that ended June 30, according to estimates from the city housing department. That's an increase of about 25 percent over the previous year and almost twice the 11,500 permits in fiscal year 2000. It's impossible to say how many homes are involved because top-to-bottom overhauls could involve four or five permits, while a big conversion of an office building into apartments is counted as a single rehab.
NEWS
February 20, 2011
The Census Bureau reported recently what many people have long suspected: Over the last decade, the growth of Maryland's population has largely been driven by Hispanics, who increasingly are settling in suburban areas of the state. The data don't say how many of them are immigrants, but it's a good bet that many are. At the same time, the report noted, the population of Baltimore City, which has been declining for decades, fell by another 30,000 residents since 2001 — more than half again as much as city officials had expected.
NEWS
December 21, 2005
We want your opinions THE ISSUE: Howard County Executive James N. Robey wants to have "affordable housing" as a part of urbanizing Columbia's Town Center. Between 2,000 and 5,000 living units are expected to be built over the next several decades, including a high-rise that will feature prices from $500,000 to more than $1 million per unit. What do you feel is the right mix of housing stock for this showpiece area of Columbia? YOUR VIEW: Send e-mail responses by tomorrow to howard.speakout@baltsun.
NEWS
June 2, 1997
THE WHOLESALE ABANDONMENT of marginal rowhouses in many Baltimore neighborhoods is easy to describe and decry. Coming up with solutions is far more difficult. The Citizens Planning and Housing Association is now trying to figure out novel answers. So is city Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson, who is enlisting a Yale University think-tank to help.There is much the city and the private sector can do. But none of that will be easy politically or racially. The unavoidable truth is that some neighborhoods are going to die. People just will not want to live in them because they are either too unsafe or their aging housing stock has outlived its usefulness.
NEWS
April 12, 1997
THERE ARE those who argue the appropriate name for the city department with the initials HCD should be Housing and Community Destruction. As Sun reporters John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner explained in their three-part series, the agency's policy of demolishing thousands of derelict houses and slapping large liens on them in the name of stopping blight actually accelerates the destruction of many city neighborhoods.Baltimore's abandoned and vacant properties -- as high as 40,000 addresses -- can be traced to two inescapable conditions.
NEWS
By Andrew A.Green and Andrew A.Green,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2002
Baltimore County officials announced a $250,000 program yesterday to provide low-cost home-improvement loans for Dundalk residents, a move designed to make older housing stock in that area more appealing to families. The Dundalk Homeowner Retention program, with funds from the state Community Legacy Program, will provide loans of up to $15,000 to qualifying homeowners in the Dundalk area who want to upgrade their kitchens, add bathrooms, install central air conditioning or make other improvements.
NEWS
January 8, 1993
Consider this bureaucratic oddity in Baltimore's municipal government: Robert W. Hearn is not only the city housing commissioner but also executive director of the federally funded Housing Authority. He is the landlord to thousands of Baltimoreans living in public housing projects -- high-rise and low-rise tenements for low-income families and senior citizens.This arrangement has obvious benefits. When one man is in charge of all governmental housing programs, it ought to result in better coordination of efforts and meshing of economies.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Eric Siegel contributed to this article | April 9, 1995
Baltimore's mayor has ordered a police crackdown on scrap dealers who buy stolen metal stripped from vacant houses, saying the practice has reached "epidemic proportions" and is causing poor residents to suffer.In a strongly worded letter sent last month to 13 dealers across the city, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said he has asked the police chief to investigate scrap dealers and bring lawbreakers to justice.nTC "This theft is affecting the well-being of the housing stock in the city," the March 23 letter says.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
Amira Williams barely survived a deadly fire three years ago that burned her family's home and 95 percent of her body. Now, the young girl faces a new tragedy. The 7-year-old will be moving out of her North Broadway home between Christmas and New Year's, but her mother, Chrissy Thomas, doesn't know where the family of four will go. Baltimore housing records show that Thomas' rental has at least 26 code violations, including rodent and mold problems and peeling paint, which could be a lead-poisoning hazard.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
Baltimore has thousands of vacant, dilapidated and abandoned houses that create serious health, safety and quality-of-life hazards for city residents. The buildings are eyesores that raise the risk of fires and structural collapses, encourage criminal activity, reduce the attractiveness of neighborhoods to potential buyers and lower property values. They're also the greatest source of urban blight, sucking the life out of communities and making every other social and economic reconstruction task there more difficult.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2010
The original brochure advertising the neighborhood of Thornleigh in the Riderwood area of west Towson described the community as "a new way of living," boasting that "never before has such an area been developed with so much care and foresight. " More than 50 years later that feeling of a traditional 1950s neighborhood, built by developer James Keelty & Co., remains intact. "It's an old-school type of neighborhood," said Chris Kennedy, president of the Thornleigh Improvement Association.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2010
Tucked away near the western edge of Baltimore, the neighborhood of Hunting Ridge is full of charm. Stone, brick and wood homes are nestled on nice-sized woodsy lots along winding streets and backed by beautiful parkland. "It's beautiful and cozy and hidden," said David McDonald, president of the Hunting Ridge Community Assembly. "It's the best neighborhood in Baltimore." Bordered by Cooks Lane, Edmonson Avenue, Swann Avenue and Leakin Park, the neighborhood is diverse, easily accessible and, according to its residents, is one of the city's best-kept secrets.
NEWS
October 21, 2009
Is Baltimore trying to drive out the middle class? It seems as though Baltimore City employees, whose salaries are paid by the hard-earned dollars of the city's taxpayers (which can only mean gainfully employed people), are actually trying to make it too costly and too much of a royal pain in the neck to live in the city. In the last couple of months, I have been a witness to so many examples of absurdities that can only lead me to this conclusion, especially when my experiences are extrapolated to other residents of the city.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2009
Found just minutes from major thoroughfares such as Interstate 95 and U.S. 40 is Belcamp, a tucked-away, quiet retreat in Harford County. Within Belcamp is the large planned community of Riverside, a neighborhood that Chris Henn said she moved to almost 25 years ago because at the time it offered affordable housing in a pleasant, family-friendly setting. "It still does," said Henn, the president of the Riverside Community Association. "It's a great place to raise a family. I know a lot of my neighbors.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,sun reporter | May 18, 2008
The only thing missing from Owings Mills New Town is the lake. Back in the 1980s, the developers' vision for the newly designated growth area in Owings Mills included a man-made lake. When an Army Corps of Engineers study concluded the lake would have a negative environmental impact, not only did it cancel plans for the lake, it also killed the community's original name: Lakeside. However, the central road through the area had already been dedicated, so today New Town residents traverse Lakeside Boulevard to get to their homes and to visit shops.
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and Ronnie Greene,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
Bristling at a newspaper report suggesting the city's crusade to stamp out blight actually contributed to it, Baltimore Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III said yesterday that his department is aggressively pursuing a multi-pronged approach to shore up a sagging housing stock.Asked to respond to issues raised in a three-part Sun series, Henson offered this assessment:"If there is a point to the series, I don't know what it is," Henson said. "If it raised some issues, I missed them."Henson's comments stood in contrast to those of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who said the report "underscored for us the complexity" of issues facing a city scrambling to secure a housing stock depleted by a population exodus and sagging under decades of wear and tear.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest and Nancy Jones Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2008
Known as the "Pride of the Gunpowder," the community of Oliver Beach in Chase is nestled in the far southeastern corner of Baltimore County. The residential waterfront neighborhood of about 500 homes boasts beautiful views of the Gunpowder River at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and of the woods directly across the river at Aberdeen Proving Ground. It was the water that first drew Frank Orzolek, an avid windsurfer, to Oliver Beach eight years ago. "It's a little mecca for water sports, crabbing and fishing," said Orzolek, the president of the Oliver Beach Improvement Association.
BUSINESS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2008
In March 1956, the small community of Ferndale still had enough rural flavor that James Lacy could fish and hunt there after his family moved to the Glen Burnie subdivision from Baltimore. Lacy, now 65, said it wasn't long before the neighborhood began to grow. Today, Ferndale is an established suburban community with few vacant lots and steady traffic along its main artery, Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard. Lacy lives within blocks of his parents' home, where his brother lives now. Many of the friends he went to school with also settled in the area.
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