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NEWS
May 30, 2011
A recent Abell Foundation study has confirmed what educators have long known: That where a student lives has at least as big an impact on academic achievement as such factors as family income, class size and per pupil spending. In fact, attending a school where most of one's classmates aren't poor is one of the best predictors of school success: Even poor students who attend such schools score better on standardized tests than their peers in schools with high concentrations of poverty.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 20, 2013
Those of you who read my first book ("Turn This Car Around") will recall my indictment of the many contributors to our historic mortgage industry meltdown and worldwide recession, AKA "The greatest financial crisis since the Great Depression," per President Barack Obama. The guilty (and greedy) included Wall Street rating houses that regularly awarded sub-prime or otherwise risky mortgage backed products their coveted AAA rating; the (formerly) powerful government sponsored enterprises, most notably Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, that lowered their underwriting standards in order to purchase ever more low quality mortgages; brokers and other middle men who helped to steer marginal credit clients into obviously unaffordable mortgages; naive (or worse)
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NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | January 4, 1996
HAVRE De GRACE -- The ongoing scrum between the federal government and the Baltimore suburbs certainly demonstrates that creating a sensible housing policy is tricky business. But many of us already knew that.We have a couple of small houses on our place which were once used by farm workers, but because we no longer have employees who live on the farm, nowadays the houses are usually rented out. Over the years this has worked out well for both landlords and tenants.The tenants get a pleasant place to live.
NEWS
Bob Ehrlich | August 25, 2013
There are so many things to say with regard to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development's proposed rule entitled "Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing. " And since this proposal lands on the hot buttons of race and class, I'm going to ask all of you to take a deep breath, put aside your preconceptions about federal housing policy for a minute, and simply give some objective thought to the size and scope of this latest missive from Washington, D.C. First, it is worthwhile to revisit a historical fact: Discriminatory housing practices were predominant in this country for a very long time.
NEWS
By John Rennie Short | September 4, 2007
As we pick through the debris caused by the subprime lending fiasco, it is pertinent to ask how we got into this mess. Dodgy lending practices, unreliable risk assessment, sheer greed and other dubious financial practices all played their part. But at the heart of the matter is the shibboleth that homeownership is the only housing policy worth pursuing. Federal policies now make the alternatives to homeownership very unattractive. Public housing has disappeared for all but the very poor, and private renters get no tax breaks.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | January 7, 1992
Read the latest reports from America's housing analysts and a nauseous feeling hits you. It seems more and more likely that the homelessness we've seen on our streets is just the tip of the iceberg, the harbinger of much worse things to come.Among all our crises of the '90s, this problem could be the easiest to solve. And the answer doesn't need to be massive expansion of government's role in housing. All we need do is spend the $113 billion the federal government already puts into housing each year in a radically different way.The case for a shake-up has never been more compelling.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
The case of Henry John "Jack" Reed III vs. Goldie Sanders is on the docket this morning in city Rent Court on North Avenue. It pits a senior housing inspector against a 33-year-old mother of two who is renting a crumbling rowhouse from him in East Baltimore.Mr. Reed wants to evict his tenant. But actually on trial are the policies of the city's Department of Housing and Community Development and a housing code that is supposed to protect renters.LTC Mr. Reed, 55, a superintendent of housing inspection for almost three decades, was allowed to amass a portfolio of 13 troubled rental properties on the city's east side with the knowledge of his immediate superiors.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, as it turns out, were a pleasant fiction. The quasi-government guarantors of mortgage loans seemed like a good deal for Americans during all the years when they helped guarantee the availability of affordable, long-term home loans without any apparent cost - and, at times, with great private gain for their shareholders. But their true cost became all too real when the government's implicit guarantee of Fannie and Freddie was made explicit during the housing crisis.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 24, 1996
Some low-income Westminster residents at the end of the line for federal housing subsidies could move up, while others near the front could be pushed back.Westminster officials want to toughen rules for housing assistance. The City Council approved a proposal last night that would give priority to those who have jobs or are in job training programs.Social welfare workers contend that the proposal would further erode aid to the vulnerable, including the homeless and battered women.The change means Westminster will stop giving preference for housing assistance to people who live in substandard housing, are homeless, have been evicted or have left their homes because of physical violence, or who pay more than half of their monthly income for rent and utilities.
NEWS
May 13, 1996
BOB DOLE surprised some people when he proposed housing vouchers as the best way to replace public housing.He surprised Henry G. Cisneros, U.S. secretary of Housing and Urban Development, who wanted to know why the Senate majority leader's own party has been chopping away at President Clinton's efforts to move in that direction.He surprised people with long memories, who know that Mr. Dole's suggestion is at least 20 years old. Shifting more public housing onto the free market was the theory behind the Section 8 program unveiled by President Ford, with whom Mr. Dole ran as vice presidential nominee in 1976.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, as it turns out, were a pleasant fiction. The quasi-government guarantors of mortgage loans seemed like a good deal for Americans during all the years when they helped guarantee the availability of affordable, long-term home loans without any apparent cost - and, at times, with great private gain for their shareholders. But their true cost became all too real when the government's implicit guarantee of Fannie and Freddie was made explicit during the housing crisis.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | February 24, 2012
How many people spend more than half their income on housing costs? More than you might think. In the Baltimore area, one in five households with workers pulling down middle-income or lower-income wages fell into that pinched group in 2010, according to a new report by the Center for Housing Policy . That's nearly 85,000 households "severely burdened by their housing costs. " But it's not quite as bad as the nation overall, with nearly one in four of what the center dubs "working households" falling into that category.
NEWS
May 30, 2011
A recent Abell Foundation study has confirmed what educators have long known: That where a student lives has at least as big an impact on academic achievement as such factors as family income, class size and per pupil spending. In fact, attending a school where most of one's classmates aren't poor is one of the best predictors of school success: Even poor students who attend such schools score better on standardized tests than their peers in schools with high concentrations of poverty.
HEALTH
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
The Annapolis Public Housing Authority's board will vote Thursday on a plan to ban some window air conditioning units in three of the city's housing complexes in order to comply with federal and local safety standards — a proposal that many residents are rallying against. Carl Snowden, chairman of the board, said he plans to vote for the ban, which would affect about 344 apartments in Robinwood, Newtowne 20 and Eastport Terrace, because the units pose a serious safety issue. Snowden said the city fire marshall and federal housing policy requires at least two emergency exits in the case of a fire or other emergency.
NEWS
By Ariela Migdal and Deborah Jeon | September 3, 2009
What if the government told you that your family couldn't live together? That your father or your son or your child's father couldn't even come over to your house to visit? That if he did visit you, he would be arrested, prosecuted for trespassing, possibly incarcerated - and you could be evicted? That's exactly what the city of Annapolis is telling its public housing residents. Fathers and mothers are prevented from living with and raising their children. Children and grandchildren are prevented from visiting and caring for their aging parents and grandparents.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | October 4, 2008
When Wayne Blair Jr. picks up his 7-year-old son for a visit, he meets him at a gas station. He isn't allowed to knock on the door of the boy's home or see his bedroom or play basketball with him on the courts near the public housing community where the child lives with his mother. Blair, 29, was barred from all Annapolis public housing after being accused of possessing drugs at one of the housing complexes in 2000. And four years after his release from prison in another drug case, that ban remains in effect.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2000
Baltimore County's ambitious vision for revitalizing long-neglected neighborhoods is drawing criticism from housing activists troubled by its apparent exclusion of the poor. Hoping to spur economic growth in areas bypassed by the current economic boom, Baltimore County is seeking the power to condemn property across large swaths of Essex-Middle River, Dundalk and Randallstown. In each neighborhood, the county plans to obtain and clear land, then look for developers to build upscale homes, offices, stores and restaurants.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Name: Sylvia Z. CanonHonored by The Carroll County Sun for: Being one of five new members appointed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer to the state Housing Policy Commission; the 17-member commission was established in 1983 to identify ways to increase housing supply and ownership opportunities for people of low to moderate incomeAge: 54Residence; hometown: Westminster; born in Soso, Miss.,and raised in Washington, D.C.Education: Bachelor of arts in American civilization from Goucher College; Eastern High School in WashingtonFamily: Daughter: Laura Nusbaum, 27, of Snydersburg; son: Thomas Canon, 23, of Owings Mills; grandchildren: Michael Nusbaum, 5; Jennifer Nusbaum, 20 months; and Nicole Canon, 6 months.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | January 30, 2008
Buyers have the upper hand in today's housing market, but that's no guarantee that they can actually afford to buy. Despite the slump in home sales and growing concessions from sellers, prices remain out of reach for a wide section of workers in the Baltimore metro area, a new report suggests. The nonprofit Center for Housing Policy said yesterday that the price of a typical local home last summer was $269,000, too expensive for a nurse, an elementary school teacher, a police officer, a retail sales employee and workers in many other jobs.
NEWS
By John Rennie Short | September 4, 2007
As we pick through the debris caused by the subprime lending fiasco, it is pertinent to ask how we got into this mess. Dodgy lending practices, unreliable risk assessment, sheer greed and other dubious financial practices all played their part. But at the heart of the matter is the shibboleth that homeownership is the only housing policy worth pursuing. Federal policies now make the alternatives to homeownership very unattractive. Public housing has disappeared for all but the very poor, and private renters get no tax breaks.
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