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NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
After concern was expressed this week about Baltimore's plans not to include middle-income people in replacement housing for the Lexington Terrace high-rise housing project, a federal housing official now says those plans are fine.Alex Sachs, a spokesman for the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said yesterday that the plans represent no change from the city's original application for a $22.9 million federal grant, so there's no need for a federal review."We were reassured [by city housing officials]
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NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | April 7, 1991
At a groundbreaking ceremony in November 1961, Mayor J Harold Grady stood on the corner of Myrtle and George streets in West Baltimore, looked out over a neighborhood of ramshackle row houses and announced the construction of a public housing complex that would halt the spreading decay.George B. Murphy Homes -- with its modern 14-story towers -- would provide affordable, sanitary and safe housing to hundreds of poor families and stimulate private improvements throughout the area, he said.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
Baltimore housing officials hired a man as a housing inspector and promoted him to a supervisory position although he had been fired by the state Department of Corrections for forging sick leave forms and convicted of more than a dozen counts of theft, according to a report released Tuesday by the city's inspector general. Algie C. Epps worked for the city Department of Housing and Community Development for five years after he was fired by the corrections department. He was promoted to assistant superintendent of code enforcement in spite of his criminal record, according to the report by city Inspector General David McClintock.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
While most of the debate on President Barack Obama's jobs bill has focused on taxes, spending on infrastructure and unemployment insurance, housing officials in Baltimore and across the country are monitoring a little-remarked proposal to revitalize vacant and abandoned properties. Though housing officials generally praise the $15 billion program, called "Project Rebuild," they say its impact will depend in large part on whether it is geared to address recent foreclosures or the more chronic abandonment of the sort found in cities such as Baltimore and Detroit.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | January 29, 2008
The smell of filth filled the small apartment. The couches were overturned, along with a washing machine, and the floors were streaked with grime. A bra lay on the floor in front of Shirley Gilbert's refrigerator. The underwear wasn't hers. Neither, she says, was the mess that drug dealers and junkies left for her to clean up in her one-bedroom apartment in the Latrobe public housing community in East Baltimore. "It's not safe here," Gilbert said. "They come in and do what they want to do. They bust the window.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | October 29, 1994
The executive director of a Baltimore nonprofit housing corporation that is being investigated for questionable expenses took out thousands of dollars in personal loans, city housing officials say.Housing Assistance Corp. Director Jennifer Jones-Williams lent herself an amount far exceeding the $500 limit allowed by the group, which develops and manages homes for the poor, said city Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III.To repay the loan, she has been deducting $200 each month from her salary.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | November 7, 1992
A steel turnstile being installed as a desperate effort to provide safety in Baltimore's public housing projects has been smashed by vandals, city housing officials said.The turnstile, one of two being installed at the Lafayette Courts project in East Baltimore, was unscrewed from its foundation and bashed into pieces on the ground about 2 a.m. yesterday.Construction had begun two weeks ago on the 7-foot turnstiles, metallic barriers that housing officials hope will keep out unwanted visitors and curb rampant drug-dealing and violent crime in the projects.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 16, 2002
The Internal Revenue Service has slapped the Housing Authority of Baltimore City with a federal tax lien, alleging the agency owes more than $626,000 in payroll taxes. Officials at the housing authority, however, say the IRS is mistaken and that no back taxes are owed. Housing officials have been trying without success to reach the IRS for an explanation for a week since learning about the lien from a reporter. The document was filed in Baltimore Circuit Court on Oct. 9. Rainbow Lin, chief financial officer for HABC, has reviewed the authority's financial records and believes they are in order, said Melvin Edwards, housing spokesman.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
Yesterday's sweep of a decrepit high-rise in the Flag House Courts complex was inspired by the Chicago Housing Authority, which has cleaned out 170 public housing buildings over the past five years, purging them of trash and drug dealers.Baltimore's two months of planning also took 10 city housing officials to Chicago to see how the experts do it.At the invitation of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Baltimore housing employees flew to Chicago for a three-day training session by Chicago housing officials.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2001
Howard County housing officials won some breathing room in their bumpy quest to buy a parcel in Elkridge for affordable homes - a deal threatened by a mix-up over grant money. Officials, who have a contract on the land but have not settled, hoped to win more time. Now it appears that the closing date, set for tomorrow, will be postponed because the owner must resolve a title problem, housing administrator Leonard S. Vaughan said yesterday. Operating under the assumption that the county might be able to buy the land after all, he has asked for an environmental assessment of the parcel to make sure nothing toxic is mixed in the soil.
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