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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | November 7, 1992
A steel turnstile being installed as a desperate effort to provide safety in Baltimore's public housing projects has been smashed by vandals, city housing officials said.The turnstile, one of two being installed at the Lafayette Courts project in East Baltimore, was unscrewed from its foundation and bashed into pieces on the ground about 2 a.m. yesterday.Construction had begun two weeks ago on the 7-foot turnstiles, metallic barriers that housing officials hope will keep out unwanted visitors and curb rampant drug-dealing and violent crime in the projects.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
Yesterday's sweep of a decrepit high-rise in the Flag House Courts complex was inspired by the Chicago Housing Authority, which has cleaned out 170 public housing buildings over the past five years, purging them of trash and drug dealers.Baltimore's two months of planning also took 10 city housing officials to Chicago to see how the experts do it.At the invitation of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Baltimore housing employees flew to Chicago for a three-day training session by Chicago housing officials.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
After concern was expressed this week about Baltimore's plans not to include middle-income people in replacement housing for the Lexington Terrace high-rise housing project, a federal housing official now says those plans are fine.Alex Sachs, a spokesman for the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said yesterday that the plans represent no change from the city's original application for a $22.9 million federal grant, so there's no need for a federal review."We were reassured [by city housing officials]
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 16, 2002
The Internal Revenue Service has slapped the Housing Authority of Baltimore City with a federal tax lien, alleging the agency owes more than $626,000 in payroll taxes. Officials at the housing authority, however, say the IRS is mistaken and that no back taxes are owed. Housing officials have been trying without success to reach the IRS for an explanation for a week since learning about the lien from a reporter. The document was filed in Baltimore Circuit Court on Oct. 9. Rainbow Lin, chief financial officer for HABC, has reviewed the authority's financial records and believes they are in order, said Melvin Edwards, housing spokesman.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2001
Howard County housing officials won some breathing room in their bumpy quest to buy a parcel in Elkridge for affordable homes - a deal threatened by a mix-up over grant money. Officials, who have a contract on the land but have not settled, hoped to win more time. Now it appears that the closing date, set for tomorrow, will be postponed because the owner must resolve a title problem, housing administrator Leonard S. Vaughan said yesterday. Operating under the assumption that the county might be able to buy the land after all, he has asked for an environmental assessment of the parcel to make sure nothing toxic is mixed in the soil.
NEWS
October 5, 2007
Arecent report from the Abell Foundation finds that housing for low-income families in Baltimore is being torn down by the city's housing authority a lot faster than any replacements are being put up. City housing officials challenge the report's conclusions and insist that reduced funding, particularly from the federal government, has limited their options. The federal government's disinvestment in public housing is clear - and should be reversed. But the city should do more - and do it faster - to create more livable spaces for the city's poor and working poor.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
Instead of tearing down dilapidated houses willy-nilly, city officials may remove whole blocks of vacant buildings, under a proposed demolition policy that could mean the razing of as many as 300 houses annually. The policy, one of Housing Commissioner Patricia J. Payne's first major initiatives, represents her attempt to restructure the demolition policy, which has come under attack in recent years by city residents who say the toppled houses become dumping grounds and magnets for drug addicts, vagrants and rodents.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
Residents of Ellicott City's subsidized Hilltop housing complex are renewing a call for ownership of the public housing community's townhouses after a recent county error in rent pricing rekindled a decades-long controversy between tenants and the county over selling Hilltop's units.This summer, county housing officials issued new lease agreements to some Hilltop residents that mistakenly raised their rents by as much as $200 a month. The errors will be corrected soon, officials say, but the problem raised anew the issue of an alleged promise to residents long ago that the county might sell them their rented homes.
NEWS
February 8, 1991
First came a study in November suggesting that high-rise public housing in Baltimore has proven a failure as a place for young families to develop. Now comes evidence that one of the few alternatives -- so-called "scattered-site housing," consisting largely of renovated row houses in poor, inner-city neighborhoods -- is also in trouble. Yesterday The Evening Sun's Joan Jacobson reported that some 300 units owned by the Housing Authority currently are vacant, and that many have been so severely vandalized they lack plumbing, aluminum windows and even the plywood planks the city installed to board them up.To put the figures in perspective, the 300 row houses in question represent only a relatively small fraction of the city's 18,000 public housing units, which include high-rise projects, senior citizens' housing and conventional low-rise developments.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Michael A. Fletcher and Melody Simmons and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writers Staff writer Robert Hilson Jr. contributed to this article | June 23, 1993
For the second time in 20 days, public housing officials conducted a sweep of a high-rise building at Flag House Courts yesterday as they continued efforts to restore order to the 487-unit complex plagued by drugs and violence.The sweep at 127 S. Exeter St. was part of the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's Extraordinary Comprehensive Housekeeping Operation, or ECHO, modeled after successful public housing cleanups in Chicago and Washington, D.C.Yesterday's sweep began at 9 a.m. when officers from the Baltimore and public housing police forces, maintenance and social workers and housing officials -- 350 people in all -- descended on the 12-story building.
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